Double Canister Filter Intake/outflow Positioning

SLeroux
  • #1
Hoping someone can help me with my filter set up. I've noticed some dead spaces in my aquarium with little water flow and after seeing some tanks online I don't think I have the best placement for my intake and outflow.

As you can see below I have my outflow from each running along the back and the intake in the back corners. The intake for one is on the opposite side of the outflow (and vise versa).

Should I rearrange when I clean the tubing this weekend to get more of a circular flow? Any help would be great.
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Mike1995
  • #2
I'd consider a power head or wavemaker
 
finnipper59
  • #3
You should have both intakes on one side of the tank and both outputs on the other. What your filters are doing right now is mainly refiltering each other's clean water. There are no true dead spots in tanks, but you have to remember that they are usually rectangular or square. There are always going to be certain spots where debris is going to accumulate...just like certain spots around square buildings and fences collect more blowing leaves in the fall. Debris has to either settle somewhere or just continue to swirl around the tank. I know it always seem to happen in a specific corner or around an ornament that's difficult to get to when bottom vacuuming, but it's going to happen. Anyway put both intakes on the same side and the same with outputs.
Hoping someone can help me with my filter set up. I've noticed some dead spaces in my aquarium with little water flow and after seeing some tanks online I don't think I have the best placement for my intake and outflow.

As you can see below I have my outflow from each running along the back and the intake in the back corners. The intake for one is on the opposite side of the outflow (and vise versa).

Should I rearrange when I clean the tubing this weekend to get more of a circular flow? Any help would be great. View attachment 443666View attachment 443667View attachment 443668
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
You should have both intakes on one side of the tank and both outputs on the other. What your filters are doing right now is mainly refiltering each other's clean water. There are no true dead spots in tanks, but you have to remember that they are usually rectangular or square. There are always going to be certain spots where debris is going to accumulate...just like certain spots around square buildings and fences collect more blowing leaves in the fall. Debris has to either settle somewhere or just continue to swirl around the tank. I know it always seem to happen in a specific corner or around an ornament that's difficult to get to when bottom vacuuming, but it's going to happen. Anyway put both intakes on the same side and the same with outputs.
Thank you! This is very helpful.
 
Mike1995
  • #5
why would you put both intakes on one side and both out takes on the other? The whole half of the tank will just be still water. Personally I've always had one intake and one out take on each end of my tank. (I have two canisters on my 112g). it's always a good idea to have surface movement on top of your water, it's helps to build oxygen in the tank and prevents Surface film/protiens etc
 
finnipper59
  • #6
Let me ask you why you would have the intake of one filter sucking in the clean water from the other filter? Both outputs on one side will give plenty of surface movement accross the length of the tank pushing all unfiltered water towards the intakes.
why would you put both intakes on one side and both out takes on the other? The whole half of the tank will just be still water. Personally I've always had one intake and one out take on each end of my tank. (I have two canisters on my 112g). it's always a good idea to have surface movement on top of your water, it's helps to build oxygen in the tank and prevents Surface film/protiens etc
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
TexasDomer I'd love your opinion as well if you don't mind!
 
HORNET1
  • #8
I'll not get into the debate, BUT I will say...
That's a lovely tank !!!
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
I'll not get into the debate, BUT I will say...
That's a lovely tank !!!
Thank you
 
aussieJJDude
  • #10
Currently, you do have circular flow... it justs a circle that goes across the top, down the front and then along the bottom to the back.


In saying that, you don't have to have the outputs on one side and inputs on the other! Theres multiple ways to do things, while that's a great suggestion, its not your only one!

If it was me, I would consider removing the spraybars, and potentually using a duckbilled attachment. Then have one facing towards the front of the tank, while the other shoots water across the back of the tank, thus creating circular motion in the tank.

Another thing I would consider is having one spraybar along the side wall, facing upwards to create good surface agitation and then the other spraybar vertical, and shooting water back... along the back!

Or have one spraybar at the surface, like before and than have the other installed along the other side, at the bottom - hence a bit of DIY, extra aquarium tubing will allow you to do so - and turn your current setup flow 'flipped' 90°, so it goes across the top, one side to the other (like left to right), down along the other side, across the bottom from one to other (like right to left) and repeat...

The benefit of the last 2 is that it will help move debris into the intakes...
 
TexasDomer
  • #11
I don't think your filters are just sucking in clean water. The outputs are not pointed at the intakes, and you should be getting good circulation, as aussie mentioned.

You can play around with the placement and see what makes sense to you and gets rid of the most dead spots. I might try putting the outputs on the sides of the tank, pointing slightly downwards, and leaving the intakes where they are. For all of my canisters, the outputs don't cause any breaks in the surface of the water, just movement, which still allows for air exchange.
 
jmaldo
  • #12
I had a similar issue decided to add a nano powerhead on a timer. Also, when researching I found this idea on a forum to check flow and dead spots. Take a chopstick and tie 3-4 pieces of thread about 2-3" long to the bottom portion spaced out about 1". This allowed me to check any area the thread showed the flow or non-flow. Kudos to the member who came up with it. Worked for me. Good Luck!

Oh, by the way the fish really enjoy swimming in the current when the powerhead kicks on.
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #13
I had a similar issue decided to add a nano powerhead on a timer. Also, when researching I found this idea on a forum to check flow and dead spots. Take a chopstick and tie 3-4 pieces of thread about 2-3" long to the bottom portion spaced out about 1". This allowed me to check any area the thread showed the flow or non-flow. Kudos to the member who came up with it. Worked for me. Good Luck!

Oh, by the way the fish really enjoy swimming in the current when the powerhead kicks on.
Wow what a smart idea! Thanks. I'll try that.
 
83jase
  • #14
Not my diagram but this how I run my 2x fluval 306 of the outlets is about 1/3 from the bottom other is near the surface no dead spots
 

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finnipper59
  • #15
That's actually a good placement and waterr flow. I have no problems with that.
Not my diagram but this how I run my 2x fluval 306 of the outlets is about 1/3 from the bottom other is near the surface no dead spots
 

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