Does This Look Ok??? - 10 Gallon Water Test Report

Tunaboy

Hey guys!

I wanted to get a second opinion on my recent water test. I did a 25% water change on Wednesday and tested the water today. What I got (or what it appears to look like to me) is:

PH: 7.6
Ammonia: 0.25 ppm
Nitrite: 0 ppm
Nitrate: 0 ppm

I was wondering if you guys think that's correct? Also, how do I lower my ammonia level to 0 ppm? My tests keep showing the ammonia level at 0.25 ppm and it's annoying.


IMG_4323.JPG


IMG_4324.JPG
 

FishBoy101

Hey guys!

I wanted to get a second opinion on my recent water test. I did a 25% water change on Wednesday and tested the water today. What I got (or what it appears to look like to me) is:

PH: 7.6
Ammonia: 0.25 ppm
Nitrite: 0 ppm
Nitrate: 0 ppm

I was wondering if you guys think that's correct? Also, how do I lower my ammonia level to 0 ppm? My tests keep showing the ammonia level at 0.25 ppm and it's annoying.


IMG_4323.JPG


IMG_4324.JPG
To me, the ammonia is lower.
 

Crimson_687

I think your tank is still in the cycling process since you don’t have nitrites or nitrates. Don’t get fish until your ammonia and nitrite show 0 and nitrate show up. You may not have bacteria in your tank yet. You should add some in. You can seed your filter with media from an established tank or buy bottled bacteria. Then, you’ll have to feed your bacteria ammonia via fish food so the colony expands to a size that will accommodate the bioload of your soon-to-be fish. But you must wait until nitrates show up, or your tank is not cycled and your fish will face death from either ammonia or nitrite poisoning.

Edit: retest your nitrates and see if any show up. It’s possible the first test didn’t read right
 

FinalFins

if ammonia is .25 then its either a false reading or you actually have ammonia. To test for false reading test some distilled water.

Your pH is actually 8-8.2, since the regular pH tests 7.6. StarGirl you win
 

Tol

Definitely do the high range pH test and see where it lands.
 

MacZ

With nitrates at zero, you are definitely not yet cycled, so the ammonia reading makes sense. If you have ammonia AND nitrate readings you're in the last phase, when you only read nitrates you're done cycling.
 

Tunaboy

I think your tank is still in the cycling process since you don’t have nitrites or nitrates. Don’t get fish until your ammonia and nitrite show 0 and nitrate show up. You may not have bacteria in your tank yet. You should add some in. You can seed your filter with media from an established tank or buy bottled bacteria. Then, you’ll have to feed your bacteria ammonia via fish food so the colony expands to a size that will accommodate the bioload of your soon-to-be fish. But you must wait until nitrates show up, or your tank is not cycled and your fish will face death from either ammonia or nitrite poisoning.

Edit: retest your nitrates and see if any show up. It’s possible the first test didn’t read right

My ammonia levels have stayed the same each time I've tested. So I want nitrites and nitrates to show up? I thought they were something you didn't want in your aquarium?

With nitrates at zero, you are definitely not yet cycled, so the ammonia reading makes sense. If you have ammonia AND nitrate readings you're in the last phase, when you only read nitrates you're done cycling.
I see, what if you're doing Fish-In cycling? How can I get everything balanced and properly cycled with a few fish in the aquarium?
 

MacZ

I see, what if you're doing Fish-In cycling? How can I get everything balanced and properly cycled with a few fish in the aquarium?

Daily/Every other daily waterchanges until there are no ammonia and nitrite readings anymore and the nitrates rise. That's how it usually works.
 

Tunaboy

Daily/Every other daily waterchanges until there are no ammonia and nitrite readings anymore and the nitrates rise. That's how it usually works.
So if I did one water change this past Wednesday, should I do another one again today?
 

Flyfisha

A fish in cycle.
As you have fish in the tank those are good readings.
Continue with small water changes regularly.

Don’t even worry about the PH at the moment.
Test the PH of your tap water after it’s been sitting in a bucket for 24 hours just for your own records . As the tank is cycling the PH in the tank water is highly likely to swing up and down. There is nothing you can do about that in a cycling tank other than continue daily or every second day small water changes.

If you are using Prime that amount of ammonia is safe for the fish for 48 hours.

Edit yes to more water changes with Prime.
 

Gone

I see, what if you're doing Fish-In cycling? How can I get everything balanced and properly cycled with a few fish in the aquarium?

Test readings and water changes are two sides of the same coin. Test frequently, every day to start, and do water changes to keep combined ammonia and nitrite at 1 ppm or below and your fish will be fine. For example, if your tests for ammonia and nitrite add up to 2.0 ppm, a 50% water change will lower the toxin levels to 1 ppm.

It's common for the API ammonia test to be read as .25 and it can be a false positive. I'd recommend testing your tap water just to be sure. If ammonia is no higher than .25, I'd look at it as a zero reading.

There's a quirk to the nitrate test. Did you shake the nitrate indicator solution bottle #2 for 30 seconds before adding the drops, then shake the test tube for 60 seconds, then let it sit for five minutes before reading?

With frequent testing and water changes, you'll also get the protection of frequent doses of Prime which will neutralize ammonia and nitrites for 48 hours.

A cycled tank will read 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites, and will have a nitrate reading. In some cases of heavily planted tanks there will be a nitrate reading of 0, but that's not very common.

How long has the tank been set up? In my experience cycling from scratch takes about five or six weeks. (I never use bottled bacteria, it doesn't work as advertised). You can add seed bacteria by adding some established filter media from another tank, or live plants, and the cycling time will take three or four weeks.
 

Tunaboy

Test readings and water changes are two sides of the same coin. Test frequently, every day to start, and do water changes to keep combined ammonia and nitrite at 1 ppm or below and your fish will be fine. For example, if your tests for ammonia and nitrite add up to 2.0 ppm, a 50% water change will lower the toxin levels to 1 ppm.

It's common for the API ammonia test to be read as .25 and it can be a false positive. I'd recommend testing your tap water just to be sure. If ammonia is no higher than .25, I'd look at it as a zero reading.

There's a quirk to the nitrate test. Did you shake the nitrate indicator solution bottle #2 for 30 seconds before adding the drops, then shake the test tube for 60 seconds, then let it sit for five minutes before reading?

With frequent testing and water changes, you'll also get the protection of frequent doses of Prime which will neutralize ammonia and nitrites for 48 hours.

A cycled tank will read 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites, and will have a nitrate reading. In some cases of heavily planted tanks there will be a nitrate reading of 0, but that's not very common.

How long has the tank been set up? In my experience cycling from scratch takes about five or six weeks. (I never use bottled bacteria, it doesn't work as advertised). You can add seed bacteria by adding some established filter media from another tank, or live plants, and the cycling time will take three or four weeks.

Yep! I shook everything up like a tutorial video instructed me too. My tank has been set up for nearly 2 weeks
 

mattgirl

Yep! I shook everything up like a tutorial video instructed me too. My tank has been set up for nearly 2 weeks
You are still very early in the cycle. I expect you will start seeing nitrites in another week or so.
 

Latest Aquarium Threads

Top Bottom