Does anyone use a pump for water changes?

chadcf
  • #1
I've been using a python for a while but on my 125 gallon tank it takes quite a while to do the water change, and I have been contemplating all the water I'm wasting while my faucet is on full blast for 20 minutes or so while doing the water change. I recently discovered there are a lot of submersible pumps out there that could pump the water out of my tank much faster and not waste water in the process. I also remodeled my guest bath closest to the tank and no longer have a faucet with threading so this seems like a good idea...

Has anyone gone the pump route? Any issues with it? My one concern here is how I would refill the tank, I could fill the sink or bucket from the faucet and use the pump to pump water back into the tank, but these pumps seem to pump at like 400-600 gallons per hour which is faster than my faucet can keep a bucket filled...
 

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BigManAquatics
  • #2
Myself, i would probably pump the old water out and dump the new bucket in, but thats just me.
 

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Zer0Fame
  • #3
Hey,

I kinda do, since I'm using RODI.

I have a food-grade barrel to collect my RODI water in which I also remineralize it. The barrel is on top of a board with wheels (made for the weight).
After water change I roll the barrel to the fish tank, dump the pump in, plug it in and wait a few minutes until it's refilled. :)

There are also pumps which you can set to the desired output. Keyword is "return pump"
 
TClare
  • #4
I have never used a python and am not sure how they work. I have 2 large and two smaller tanks. I syphon the water out with a hosepipe (through an outside window to the garden, which I appreciate might not be possible for everyone). For refilling my husband made a simple adaptor for a normal hosepipe so that it will fit on the kitchen tap. I adjust the gas heater to the correct temperature and fill the tanks with the hosepipe.

This is the adaptor:

tempImagebBz99w.png
 
SamMe
  • #5
I have the Hygger Multifunctional Bottom Intake Water Pump HG-919-1500, which I ordered through Amazon. I bought it to use on my 55g for the same reasons you stated and I love it. It has multiple size hose attachments, so I just use my Python hose for it. I'm using my Python to refill my tanks, but this one might be slow enough for your faucet/bucket method to keep up. If not, there is a size below it (and two sizes above).

Edit: I just looked and mine says 400 gph, of which I am skeptical. Amazon is great with returns, so you could always try it and if it's too powerful, downsize.
 
cjcummings
  • #6
I take water out and remove waste with a siphon. I put back water in with a pump. 20 gallon bucket is used as a ramp on and ramp off for the water.
 

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SparkyJones
  • #7
I have a big gravel vac that I modified with 50 ft of tubing and a hose hook up, it's slow to drain, like you said with the python, and drains out to the lawn and doesn't require the water running like the python does.
but when I go to refill I run it outside to the outdoor hose hookup and it fills quickly.
I think you could get away with a pump to take out the water and then the python to refill. as long as the python isn't wasting water on the refill part your mission is accomplished. Maybe not quite as fast as you'd like but it's no slower than refilling with the python either and you'd be speeding up the draining part.

I'll be going to a pump to drain here also, gravity is slow and gets slower after the halfway point and painfully slow at 75% empty.
 
bgarthe
  • #8
I use two 45g Brut garbage cans on the wheel carts made for them. Each can has a permanent submerged pump w hose. The electric cord for the pump is hanging on the side.

I gravel vac my tanks by siphon into my discarded water garbage can, wheel it to the kitchen and pump out the discarded tank water. Then I take my other can I filled days ago which had been aerating and being heated and pump the aged/heated/aerated water into the tank with its hose. Then I wheel this can to the kitchen and refill it w RO and tap water and wheel back to its waiting spot for aerating, aging, and heating for next time.

By filling up a can for next time, I can have it aged to settle pH etc, aerated since it’s well water, and heated to exactly match the tank water. I do, however, heat my storage tank/can water to one degree higher than the actual tank water. My electric cords for pumps each have their inline switch and each tip of the hose has a valve to shut off/open up the water flow should I need to.

My tanks are too big for WCs using the bucket routine and I’m too old to be lugging numerous buckets around the house. This works great for me.
 
KribensisLover1
  • #9
I've been using a python for a while but on my 125 gallon tank it takes quite a while to do the water change, and I have been contemplating all the water I'm wasting while my faucet is on full blast for 20 minutes or so while doing the water change. I recently discovered there are a lot of submersible pumps out there that could pump the water out of my tank much faster and not waste water in the process. I also remodeled my guest bath closest to the tank and no longer have a faucet with threading so this seems like a good idea...

Has anyone gone the pump route? Any issues with it? My one concern here is how I would refill the tank, I could fill the sink or bucket from the faucet and use the pump to pump water back into the tank, but these pumps seem to pump at like 400-600 gallons per hour which is faster than my faucet can keep a bucket filled...
Let us know how this goes (with pics)!! I’m over the Python a little. I mean it’s amazing and a game changer but I spend a lot of time lugging it around to tanks and the on//off switch has broken many times. My fault bc of sand and I finally bought a brass one but I would love to hear about your experience!!
 
coralbandit
  • #10
I vacuumed/syphoned or just drained to Rubbermaid barrel on dolly and had fresh water in separate Rubbermaid barrel that I would pump back in with a hook to hold on tank.
Some fashion fancy returns to not mess up tanks. A simple T worked for me.
The make them in 10,20,32 and 42 gallons. Same dolly [ not cheap] fits all.
I liked pumps in the 500GPH range for filling.
I also made a temperature mixing station where I could adjust water temp perfect.
I had two hoses running from that for my fish room and totes with pumps that went out the window.
 

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FishDin
  • #11
I siphon the tank water out to a nearby sink. I also plumbed a drain pipe from the floor to the basement for the tank that is lower than the sink and using the sink siphon is not possible. I pump new water up from a 35gal resovoir in my basement where it has been treated and heated.

I never bought a python because, as you said, it wastes a lot of water.
 
chadcf
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
I have the Hygger Multifunctional Bottom Intake Water Pump HG-919-1500, which I ordered through Amazon. I bought it to use on my 55g for the same reasons you stated and I love it. It has multiple size hose attachments, so I just use my Python hose for it. I'm using my Python to refill my tanks, but this one might be slow enough for your faucet/bucket method to keep up. If not, there is a size below it (and two sizes above).

Edit: I just looked and mine says 400 gph, of which I am skeptical. Amazon is great with returns, so you could always try it and if it's too powerful, downsize.

That's the one I ordered, and you are right that rating is extremely generous. I would say it's more like 100 gph tops, took about 10 minutes to get maybe 15% of my 125 drained. But that's good, I'm able to just fill into a 5 gallon bucket from the faucet and have it pump it back into the tank without it running dry.

I think using the python to refill would still be a bit easier, but it seems like newer fixtures just don't have easily removable aerators with appropriate threading anymore.
 
MrMuggles
  • #13
Hey,

I kinda do, since I'm using RODI.

I have a food-grade barrel to collect my RODI water in which I also remineralize it. The barrel is on top of a board with wheels (made for the weight).
After water change I roll the barrel to the fish tank, dump the pump in, plug it in and wait a few minutes until it's refilled. :)

There are also pumps which you can set to the desired output. Keyword is "return pump"
My approach is similar, it only works if draining to a lower altitude, as it removes water from the tank by siphon.

I have two large plastic tubs that are used to pre-treat water with dechlorinator and GH additives. I run my siphon hose from the overflow box to the bathtub, run a very small utility/pond pump to move water from the reservoirs (which are connected by a PVC elbow siphon so they act as one) to the first chamber of my sump box.
Once everything is in place I do three steps:
1. Start the drain siphon by sucking on the far end of hose
2. Turn on pump
3. adjust primary drain valve, Restrict until backup drain is heard active

after that I let it run and just watch the level in the sump, which is stabilized though a balance of siphon and pump flow.

The filler system remains on for the entire process.


The water level never changes, no extra stress for fish or plants!


4C20497C-B0CD-4CAD-A455-9A29E4DBF027.jpeg
 

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