Do you all quarantine/deworm your new fish?

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Do you quarantine and/or deworm all new fish?


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RomanNoodles96

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I've never done a poll like this or thread in general, but I want to see what people do and how much success they've gotten with it. I personally quarantine for at least 2 weeks and deworm with prazipro and now I'm going to use levamisole as well (new fish had something the prazipro didn't treat). I will do 2 courses of each, the 2nd course for killing the newly hatched parasites. So, what do you all do with new fish?
 
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Hugooo

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I have not done either before. I do not have the money or room for a quarantine tank, and I don't even know what deworming is. I will probably be buying some fish for my new tank so I will look more into deworming. And I believe that quarantine is really only necessary if you are buying expensive/rare fish, or you are a serious hobbyist. I think it's good to have hospital tank on hand, but I am only 13, so as you can imagine, finances and room are limited to me. :p
 
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RomanNoodles96

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Hugooo said:
I have not done either before. I do not have the money or room for a quarantine tank, and I don't even know what deworming is. I will probably be buying some fish for my new tank so I will look more into deworming. And I believe that quarantine is really only necessary if you are buying expensive/rare fish, or you are a serious hobbyist. I think it's good to have hospital tank on hand, but I am only 13, so as you can imagine, finances and room are limited to me. :p
I understand. I just deworm as you can't really tell they have internal parasites until its too late/after they've had them for a while. If you purchase the fish from a reputable breeder then quarantine isn't a must at all.
 
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Trenzalore

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I always quarantine but haven't dewormed. To be honest, I'm not sure what to deworm with that won't break the bank; wouldn't API general cure work? I'm going to be stocking my 55g soon and will definitely deworm for this because I would lose a lot more in a 55g than a 5g.
 
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Flyfisha

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As written above we are all working with a different set of tools. We don’t all have more tanks than sense and can find a spare tank at a moment’s notice.

I have been caught out more than once. In fact I have a tank with ich at the moment that I am convinced come in with some plants ( val ).
A used strong algae killer and a splash of snail killer as the plant sat in a bucket for 48 hours plus but still let the ich parasite into my tank.

Yes I treat all all new fish with deworming powder.
It looks like I need to be more careful with plants as well?
I often quarantine in a tank of grow out fry . So I guess that’s not a true quarantine but I write the date they arrive and watch them all daily.
 
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kbn

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Hugooo A suitably sized Tupperware container with a spare filter or airstone is enough to be a quarantine tank. What if your new fish infect your existing ones? Some of the fish may be inherently weak or more delicate and if something happens to them.... you'd rather not let that happen right? If you separate your new fish, you can observe them and after an appropriate amount of time, release them into the main tank. If something happens or if the new fish are affected, at least it will remain with the new fish and not spread everywhere. Trust me, a quarantine 'tank' is really helpful, I'm a kid as well and I've faced argulus, ich and lots of other pests and parasites and lots of my fish have died even with proper care.
 
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RomanNoodles96

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Trenzalore said:
I always quarantine but haven't dewormed. To be honest, I'm not sure what to deworm with that won't break the bank; wouldn't API general cure work? I'm going to be stocking my 55g soon and will definitely deworm for this because I would lose a lot more in a 55g than a 5g.
General cure will be good for the most common internal parasites like tapeworms, but It won't treat camallanus worms, and some others I cant remember the exact name of. General cure contains praziquantel (a dewormer, but also good for flukes in some cases) and metronidazole (an antibiotic which is used by the fish a lot better when consumed). General cure is way more effective when mixed with the food so if you do use it I would try that as not only is it more effective it will also last longer.
 
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BigBeardDaHuZi

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I like to do paraguard for a week on new fish. And paracleanse for the working.

I have a 20 gallon I am setting up as a quarantine tank, but I know it is going to be mighty tempting to turn it a shellie tank


Edit: worming* not working. Stupid autocorrect
 
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Fisch

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kbn said:
Hugooo A suitably sized Tupperware container with a spare filter or airstone is enough to be a quarantine tank. What if your new fish infect your existing ones? Some of the fish may be inherently weak or more delicate and if something happens to them.... you'd rather not let that happen right? If you separate your new fish, you can observe them and after an appropriate amount of time, release them into the main tank. If something happens or if the new fish are affected, at least it will remain with the new fish and not spread everywhere. Trust me, a quarantine 'tank' is really helpful, I'm a kid as well and I've faced argulus, ich and lots of other pests and parasites and lots of my fish have died even with proper care.
I totally agree. Quarantine does not have to be expensive, a bucket will do if needed.
After infecting a whole tank with ich, going through medication and heat, getting to limits what individual fish can tolerate....it is not worth the hassle. I quarantine 6-8 weeks now, no excuse. May be overkill but the last batch of Neons had ich, and the heat treatment in QT went smooth without panic and stress on the big tank.
 
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CosmicFish

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I only medicate fish if I know they are coming from a situation that will more likely than not bring parasites or other diseases (for instance when I feel bad for feeder fish and get a few to own). But usually I quarantine and watch closely on other fish.
 
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RomanNoodles96

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I've read everyone's answer and I completely understand all of them. I've had terrible luck with fish as my neons all got columnaris, every single Livebearer I have brought in (from 2 different stores) have had internal parasites, some guppies had tapeworms and now my platys have something that praziquantel isn't curing so I ordered some levamisole, and a female betta brought in ich. Thats the main reason why I quarantine, but I know some people have had amazing luck and have never encountered anything but ich and dont quarantine.
 
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chromedome52

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Technically I never quarantined, though effectively I did, as I kept fish in species tanks for growing out or breeding. I have had fish bring infections into the fishroom, and by maintaining the isolation I was able to either cure it or not. On one occasion, however, I did bring in some fish caught wild in Florida that developed some sort of infection. After a short while I noticed the same infection showing up in a couple of my tropical tanks as well. and was unable to find a cure for it. I did, however, realize that my standard practice of hanging up nets to dry seemed to still be allowing the disease to be spread. At this point I mixed a dip bucket with some heavy duty meds, toxic levels for fish if I'd used it for treating directly. Any time a net was used in a tank, it went into the dip bucket for at least 24 hours, then it could be hung to dry. That did eliminate the problem, though it cost me some valuable fish before I caught it. The tanks that it occurred in were torn down and bleach cleaned.

I've never de-wormed fish, however, given the prevalence of certain parasites from certain sources these days, I would be likely to do so should I try those fish involved. However, I don't like using heavy meds unless there is reason to believe the fish are infected.
 
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BigBeardDaHuZi

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Ho
chromedome52 said:
Technically I never quarantined, though effectively I did, as I kept fish in species tanks for growing out or breeding. I have had fish bring infections into the fishroom, and by maintaining the isolation I was able to either cure it or not. On one occasion, however, I did bring in some fish caught wild in Florida that developed some sort of infection. After a short while I noticed the same infection showing up in a couple of my tropical tanks as well. and was unable to find a cure for it. I did, however, realize that my standard practice of hanging up nets to dry seemed to still be allowing the disease to be spread. At this point I mixed a dip bucket with some heavy duty meds, toxic levels for fish if I'd used it for treating directly. Any time a net was used in a tank, it went into the dip bucket for at least 24 hours, then it could be hung to dry. That did eliminate the problem, though it cost me some valuable fish before I caught it. The tanks that it occurred in were torn down and bleach cleaned.

I've never de-wormed fish, however, given the prevalence of certain parasites from certain sources these days, I would be likely to do so should I try those fish involved. However, I don't like using heavy meds unless there is reason to believe the fish are infected.
Holding off on the anti-biotics makes sense, but I wonder how harsh the de-wormers are. I know it really isn't relative, but de-worming a cat is not a traumatic experience.

I had a dirty batch of tetras give my betta what I can only guess was fin rot (?) I woke up the next morning and he had lost all his flowing fins. He looked ravaged.
I almost euthanized him, but he was still making a good effort to avoid the net, so I gave him a chance.
I dosed with stress coat and then paraguard for a week. I lost a cory and two cherry barbs, but Cereal finally pulled through. His fins have grown back in and he is very healthy and beautiful again these days.

When I get to stocking my big tank, I am going to do Cory's med trio on all my cichlids before they go in the display tank. They are too expensive to mess about
 
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