Question Do my new dwarf puffers look skinny?

TimeHalt

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10 gal planted tank, added them both yesterday. Nothing else in the tank but a bunch of snails. One of them (I believe a female) has definitely eat a few bloodworms, and a few snails. I believe I saw the other one (slightly smaller, think a male) eat one snail and one bloodworm. They chased each other around a few times today but seemed like they started to leave each other alone eventually. The smaller one was definitely more stressed during the acclimation process. My friend runs the LFS and has had these puffers for over 2 months, and said that I won't need to add meds because they are doing fine and he's had them so long. Just want to make sure that they don't look too skinny.. or rather that their skinniness isn't a problem.
Link to 20 second video where you can clearly see them both:
 
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FishGirl38

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Well, since he is your friend, it may be beneficial to ask him where he got these puffers from. Mainly looking for if they were captive bred, or wild caught. Oftentimes, these guys are wild caught because they're difficult to breed in captivity, and with wild caught fish, they almost always come with parasites or other ailments that need treated. Additionally, you could ask him if he quarantines and medicates his stock before they're up for sale. Lastly, it would help to know how often they were fed, and what they were eating. These guys will rarely accept flake or staple foods.

With the dwarf puffer, the issue is often internal parasites, and if they are wild caught and were not medicated by the LFS, than you may want to medicate them as a precautionary measure. The one does look a little skinny. I can't say for sure whether he's affected or not. But a 'sunken stomach' is a sign to look for. Keep an eye on his excrement. If it's white and stringy, I would medicate.
 
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TimeHalt

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FishGirl38 said:
Well, since he is your friend, it may be beneficial to ask him where he got these puffers from. Mainly looking for if they were captive bred, or wild caught. Oftentimes, these guys are wild caught because they're difficult to breed in captivity, and with wild caught fish, they almost always come with parasites or other ailments that need treated. Additionally, you could ask him if he quarantines and medicates his stock before they're up for sale. Lastly, it would help to know how often they were fed, and what they were eating. These guys will rarely accept flake or staple foods.

With the dwarf puffer, the issue is often internal parasites, and if they are wild caught and were not medicated by the LFS, than you may want to medicate them as a precautionary measure. The one does look a little skinny. I can't say for sure whether he's affected or not. But a 'sunken stomach' is a sign to look for. Keep an eye on his excrement. If it's white and stringy, I would medicate.
Great, thank you. They are indeed wild caught. He fed them frozen bloodworms once a day. I do have prazipro and I may use that just to be safe but I'll keep an eye out before I do.
 

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Yeah, the skinny could still be due to other factors. I would do the same, keep an eye on em and if you notice anything else of concern, I'd go ahead and use the prazipro. :). Good luck to you, I've heard these guys are delicate, but in my experience, mine were pretty resilient. and these look really healthy too, minus the skinny but, good color, pattern, and size. They should bounce back if there is anything up with em. :).
 
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TimeHalt

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FishGirl38 said:
Yeah, the skinny could still be due to other factors. I would do the same, keep an eye on em and if you notice anything else of concern, I'd go ahead and use the prazipro. :). Good luck to you, I've heard these guys are delicate, but in my experience, mine were pretty resilient. and these look really healthy too, minus the skinny but, good color, pattern, and size. They should bounce back if there is anything up with em. :).
What should their poop look like if healthy? I could be wrong (this may be frozen bloodworms that are deteriorating but I don't think so) but there are a few small, white-ish wormy looking things that I believe to be their poop..
 
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So my friend who owns the LFS that I bought the puffers from says he medicates them once he receives them. They seem to be doing pretty well overall, the female is eating a decent amount for sure and is quite active and curious while the male is eating but maybe not as much? and he's still a bit more easily afraid. But if they're eating and active and have good coloration then these are good signs right? Only things that are scaring me now is their skinniness and their poop.. but I do want to know what a healthy DP's poop would look like
 

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Well, it should typically be dark, and full - color can depend on their diet too though. I haven't seen them get long strands like how plecos can. But it shouldn't be white. :/.

Keep feeding them, try varying their diet with spirulina brine and maybe mysis shrimp as well (or live baby bladdar snails...) If you know they're eating well, but they continue to have a sunken stomach or aren't seeming to gain weight, I would assume there may be something else going on.

**a note on bladder snails (or ramshorn snails):
If you don't already have some, these guys often come in with live aquarium plants in the stores. In stores, they're usually not for sale (they're more cost for anyone to catch and bag than they're worth) BUT, if you notice one and ask the sales person if you could have it with (instert fish or plant you're buying)....rarely will they refuse. They might, and thats okay too, but usually its not a problem for most places.

Why you would do this, is because these snails reproduce like crazy in batches of 20 or more, they lay sacs full of little sand grain sized snail eggs. If you were to keep one or a few bladder (or ramshorn snails) in a small, sponge filtered tank, you could end up breeding your own fresh puffer snails. They're a good treat and a good way to keep your puffers beaks ground down. :).
 
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FishGirl38 said:
Well, it should typically be dark, and full - color can depend on their diet too though. I haven't seen them get long strands like how plecos can. But it shouldn't be white. :/.

Keep feeding them, try varying their diet with spirulina brine and maybe mysis shrimp as well (or live baby bladdar snails...) If you know they're eating well, but they continue to have a sunken stomach or aren't seeming to gain weight, I would assume there may be something else going on.

**a note on bladder snails (or ramshorn snails):
If you don't already have some, these guys often come in with live aquarium plants in the stores. In stores, they're usually not for sale (they're more cost for anyone to catch and bag than they're worth) BUT, if you notice one and ask the sales person if you could have it with (instert fish or plant you're buying)....rarely will they refuse. They might, and thats okay too, but usually its not a problem for most places.

Why you would do this, is because these snails reproduce like crazy in batches of 20 or more, they lay sacs full of little sand grain sized snail eggs. If you were to keep one or a few bladder (or ramshorn snails) in a small, sponge filtered tank, you could end up breeding your own fresh puffer snails. They're a good treat and a good way to keep your puffers beaks ground down. :).
Thanks for the detailed response. When I was cycling my tank, a bladder snail actually sneaked its way in and started a population.. by the time I added the puffers (a few weeks later) there were easily 80 bladder snails. That population seems to be going down every day. The female seems to eat a lot, and I can't tell if the male is eating them or just killing them.
I have ordered some more medications in addition to my prazipro because I figured it's better safe than sorry. The male seems to eat very little and is a lot more shy than the female, and skinner.
I will try more foods though and a more varied diet!
 

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Awesome, If it's anything, these puffers have been in the store for quite awhile as I understood, So...they were healthy enough to make it this far, I'm not sure the ailment (if there is one at all) won't be too difficult to eradicate. :). I wish you luck and fast shipping on those meds. :)
 

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