Do Bettas Get Stressed In Tanks That Are Too Big? Question

Discussion in 'Betta Fish' started by Kittenluna, Aug 5, 2019.

  1. Kittenluna

    KittenlunaValued MemberMember

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    I have 2 male bettas and they are currently in a 20 gallon split in half, so they have 10 gallons each. But im interested in a 50 gallon for them. So im just wondering if they'd be stressed in 25 gallon each. If so would slowly increasing the tank size be better ?
     
  2. david1978

    david1978Fishlore LegendMember

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    Mine were in a 75 but I downgraded them to a 55. We have other members with them in community tanks too.
     
  3. Repolie

    RepolieWell Known MemberMember

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    There are very few bettas that get very stressed and have problems when introduced into a large space, but the majority of bettas shouldn't have a problem. All fish get stressed when placed in a new environment and soon settle in.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Kittenluna

    KittenlunaValued MemberMember

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    Pretty much what im interested in is a 50 gallon split down the center. I dont want any tank mates with them cause they're really not nice and killed the zebra danios i put in with them ****
     
  5. OwnerOfNubzTheBetta

    OwnerOfNubzTheBettaNew MemberMember

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    In my experience, Two male bettas inhabiting the same water supply can stress them. Because of their "aggressive" nature. I didn't have much trouble with my Betta when I transferred him to the 10-15 gal tank of my own after it was used to a 5 gal tank. If anything he loved the space. Just make sure there is enough shrubs and decor for him to hide behind if he does feel he is too much in the open. I saw my betta swim to the corners of the tank when I had lesser decor in the tank rather than his usual swimming patterns.

    Conclusion: Switching is fine, be mindful to use the same medium as the previous tank when starting to cycle the new tank.
    Add more decor to help the Betta's feel more safe and less tense with being too much in the open.
     
  6. ystrout

    ystroutWell Known MemberMember

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    No, that's a myth that originated because pet stores were selling them in 1 gallon bowls and they needed justification.

    They'll love the biggest environment possible. They do prefer low water flow though. They're not the best swimmers...

    All fish get stressed the first couple days they're in a new environment, just like people get stressed when they move across the country. But they'll settle in once they get used to their new home and learn there aren't any predators around.

    25 gallons each would be great for them. They'd love it.
     
  7. CheshireKat

    CheshireKatWell Known MemberMember

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    I have a female betta who didn't like my 25 gallon community tank at all. She got stress stripes, zipped around everywhere in distress, flared, and didn't look happy. As soon as I put her back in the 5 gallon, she colored up and was happy again. My other female wasn't bothered at all when I put her in the community tank and adapted immediately. She absolutely loved all the space, particularly liked to patrol around the aquarium dwarf lily at night. I still feel bad about downgrading her to 5 gallons, which she doesn't seem to like, but she was overeating with the livebearers and started to get a taste for fry. For her health, I had to remove her and she slimmed down within a couple weeks.

    I think, in terms of space, it's not unlike people. Sure, I like my space all right, but put me in a mansion all by myself that I have to maintain and look after by myself, and I'll go nuts (especially since I'd probably never, ever be able to find anything... I lose things within 20 feet as it is). I think bettas are the same way. Some might not want to have a vast space to be responsible for and get overwhelmed.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
  8. ShimmeryLuna

    ShimmeryLunaValued MemberMember

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    In the wild, Betta fish have territories of roughly one square meter, which is 100L or 26.4gal. So if you get the larger tank, you'd pretty much be mimicking their natural territories. Knowing this, I think they'd do fine as long as they have plenty of places to hide (and low current of course). The bigger the 'Betta' ;).
     
  9. CindyVBPets

    CindyVBPetsValued MemberMember

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    NO definitely not stressful. No doubt in my mind my Bettas would like the largest tank possible. They are constantly exploring and you can tell they would go much further if the glass wasn't in the way. They'd like it heavily planted. With interesting exploration areas like this.

    I just put this quartz piece in there and my fish is all around it very curious. They get bored.

    A 40 Breeder tank may be better because isn't not as tall since they're not excellent swimmers so make sure you have stuff floating up top, too.

    Aug2-shell.



    betta-curious1.JPG

    quartz.JPG
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2019
  10. e_watson09

    e_watson09Well Known MemberMember

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    The only time its an issue really is with bettas that have heavy fins making it harder for them to swim. It can make it harder to get to the top of the tank. Now most of them are fine but sometimes the big half moons can struggle a bit. Especially since the larger tank filters are usually stronger and their fins are like a parachute.
     
  11. david1978

    david1978Fishlore LegendMember

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    They build up strength and swim pretty good. The filter they learn to stay away from. Other times they purposely swim into the flow.
     
  12. e_watson09

    e_watson09Well Known MemberMember

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    Oh I agree, I more just meant at first more than anything. :) A healthy well conditioned fish this likely is not an issue.
     
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