DIY Filter

GBR.Moorrreeee

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This summer i am building a 60 gallon tank made out of plywood and glass. For the filter i was thinking about intergrating it into the back of the hood im going to make out of wood. Basically i was thinking of having a pump (box on the left) pull water up a tube into a long plastic bin. The water wood be pushed by the pump through the sponge, and then a combination of media ( not sure) and something that will naturally raise the tanks PH (ideas??), and then have a power head pull the water down and into the tank. This is just a quick idea, and the only thing i could think of since there will be no space under the tank. Sorry for the poor drawing.
 

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Nutter

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All I get is hundreds of letter 'y's when I try to view your image.
I think I sort of understand what you are describing. (maybe??)

What sounds like it might work for you is a section of plastic guttering fitted into the back of the hood with an access panel in the top. The guttering would extend from one side of the tank to the other on a slight slope from one side to the other. Fill the gutter with your media (sponge, ceramic rings etc). Use a pump inside the tank to pump water up into the high side of the gutter. Gravity would push the water through the media & back into the tank. The trick would be getting the pumping volume right so that the gutter did not over flow when the media got dirty. You would also need to modify any evaporation lids to allow space for the water to return to the tank. A hinged perspex lid on the gutter would help with condensation & moisture issues around the lighting.

Crushed coral, limestone & sea shells can all be used for raising the PH/KH levels. All can be used either as a filter media or as part of the decorations or substrate. Shells dissolve fast so are not the best choice IMO. My favourite is limestone chips in the filter.
 
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GBR.Moorrreeee

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Thanks. All I'm talking about is instead of having a gutter, have decent sized trough about 46x8x4, and at the end without the pump cut out a little thing like what are on HOB's where the water flows over, or have another pump or power head so I would also have circulation in the tank. With the power head down there, it would ensure that water continously moved through the filter, and there would be no chance of the overflow. For the media, since I have all that space, I was thinking of having; Sponge, limestone chips, sponge filter floss and then poly filter for the chemical side. Sorry about the photo, I used paint.
 
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Nutter

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I think just having gravity take care of the return would be the way to go. Too hard to try to sync two pumps exactly. I've seen buckets hung over open topped aquaria used as extremely efficient filters. Holes are punched into the bottom of the bucket which is suspended over the top of the open aquarium. The bucket is filled with various media & the water is pumped into the top of the bucket via a shower rose arrangement. Possible the most effective filter arrangement I've ever seen.

I'm sure you could do something similar if you set it back from the tank a little (or to one side) & have the water returning through a PVC pipe so you could still have your hood & lights how you want them.
 
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GBR.Moorrreeee

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Question; wouldn't the pumps on both sides work if they were the same exact type, for example, two Rio 6HF?
 

lanlesnee

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I would stick with one pump. Don't expect the pumps to have the exact flow rate because the are the same.
What happens if your return pump stops and the supply pump keeps pumping? Even with one pump make sure you have an overflow that will lead back into the tank. This is a good idea for when you media loads up so the water has somewhere to go.

Nutter's bucket idea seems best. Why not set the tube vertical with several hole on the bottom. Pump water into the top and let it natually flow though the tube and bottom. Also have a small hold with a tube hooked to the top. Have the tube lead back into the tank, so you have an over flow. You could even use flower pots stacked on top of one another as long as they fit in the tube nice and snug for filter chambers to load with what you like.
 
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GBR.Moorrreeee

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I have a quick question; why are the pumps for filters (or at least the HOB's I have) in front of the media?? Wouldn't it be more effective to have the pump pull the water through the media causing less detoriation of the pump because there's less stuff in the water because of the mechanical filtration?? And therefore increased GPH and pump lifespan? (Sorry for the stupid question).
 
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