DIY Canister filter for 125 gallon tank.

mysticdragon72
  • #1
I am about to get a used 125 gallon tank I found online and I have been considering different types of filtration for it. I have been told various brands of canisters but I am a DIY type of person and prefer to make things myself so I don't have to spend top dollar on something I can do myself.
So I've been searching youtube for videos of how to put together my own canister filter for the tank and I have the basic plans in mind but I'm not too sure on the actual size it has to be? I know that I want around 500-800 GPH depending on the bioload of the tank but is that dependent upon the return pump alone or the size of the container I use or??? Please advise me on this before I make something that will never work out LOL.

I have attached a pic of the tank from the email I got from the guy who's selling it... you can see the two boxes on either side of the tank which, from what I've read, are the overflow boxes? Correct me if I'm wrong... and please instruct me on just how I utilize them for my filtration. Sorry if I sound lost... but I am.. truly lost! I have three other tanks and all three of them have the power bio-wheel filters on them so I am not well versed on anything else just yet.

TIA for all the help!
ttfn
Mystic.
 

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Dolfan
  • #2
I would check out the SunSun canister filters on ebay/amazon. They are super cheap, and I don't think you could construct a DIY for the same price as the SunSun's, and they work great too. For 125 gallon I would go with perhaps 2 of the smaller HW-302's or perhaps 1 of their larger models the HW-404B. The larger model also has a built in UV sterilizer to help when needed for certain treatments or to help eliminate free floating algae.

Either way I'm a big fan of using multiple types of filters to have backup and not put all your eggs in one basket. So perhaps 2 air driven sponge filters would be a good supplement.

As for the overflow boxes, they are hard to see in your photo. The basic concept is that you stuff them with some mesh or sponges to catch the large stuff, then a ton of bio-media. You set up a pump to pump water from the tank into the boxes, where it flows up and out the top of the box back into the tank. The tank is kept a little bit lower then boxes, so the "overflow" will always go back into the tank.

If you use the overflow boxes, you will probably just need some stronger pumps, and then your media. I'm not an expert on overflow boxes, but I'm sure some google searching on "aquarium overflow filter" or something like that will show you a lot of examples.
 
tameone
  • #3
Agreed. It's difficult to recommend a DIY filter setup when SunSuns are so inexpensive for the quality.
 
BGKFan
  • #4
I do agree with everyone about Sun sun being best bang for your buck however if you do want to make your own canister search for a pond pump that's rated for 1000+gph (I've seen a few for like 20 bucks on eBay and Amazon...whether they push the rated water Idk) once all said and done you'll get around 500 gph depending on your set up (which is much higher than Sun suns filters) I recommend pvc made canister myself. Good luck if you do decide to do it. It won't be hard and if you do please post it up I love seeing diy ideas

 
mysticdragon72
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
Well guys I really, really appreciate all the advice and the time it took you to just read and reply but the guy who was selling it still hasn't got back to me so I'm assuming he sold it to someone else!
I will be getting another one just not right now! So thanks again for taking the time to share your advice and knowledge....sorry but it wasn't a waste since I can use the advice for when I actually do get a 125!

Ttfn
 
BGKFan
  • #6
Good luck !

 
SnyperTodd
  • #7
As for the overflow boxes, they are hard to see in your photo. The basic concept is that you stuff them with some mesh or sponges to catch the large stuff, then a ton of bio-media. You set up a pump to pump water from the tank into the boxes, where it flows up and out the top of the box back into the tank. The tank is kept a little bit lower then boxes, so the "overflow" will always go back into the tank.

I think you're thinking of the integrated filters on some of the smaller all-in-one tanks that are available now. Generally, on a tank like this, there will be holes drilled behind the overflow boxes for the plumbing to a sump filter. That's not to say you couldn't pack them full of biomedia or whatever else you wanted to, but often they are somewhat undersized for what the filter would ideally turnover and you would want to keep the flow through them as unrestricted as possible.
 

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