Question Discus Temperature Debate

Lucyn

Valued Member
Messages
426
Reaction score
202
Points
83
Experience
2 years
To my understanding, the correct, exact Discus temperature hasn't been fully concluded. I hear of some people keeping their Discus at temps as high as 88-90F, and as low as 80-82F, which is a very big range. There's pro's and con's to both, I've always kept them around 86F when they're young, and 84F as adults, but I'm starting to question that, now. What do you keep your Discus at, or have kept them at and why? I've found myself stuck in the middle between the two, and don't know which one's pro's outweigh the con's more, so some second opinions would be appreciated :) Here are some of the advantages I've researched and gathered together for both.
88F
-Increases natural instincts and metabolism, leading to a greater appetite, possibly increased breeding behaviors and faster growth.
-Annihilates almost any parasitic infection possible.
-Found to be their temperature in their natural habitats.
-Increased color quality, makes colors pop.
82F
-Higher oxygen count in the water, leading to a greater maximum stocking count. With the higher oxygen, toxins/parameters slightly aren't as big of a factor. Which is very relevant when it comes to Discus, or any fish for that matter.
-A dramatically decreased chance for bacterial infections, considering bacterial infections thrive in higher temperatures, which are normally very common in Discus.
-An increased life span, it isn't totally proven, but some studies refer to lower temps has led to an increased life span of up to 5 times longer, compared to higher temps.
-If you run a planted tank, not that it affects the actual Discus dramatically, but algae thrives in high temperatures when plants themselves thrive in lower temperatures.
-Your electricity bill will thank you ;)
-Friendlier on other fish if it's a community tank.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #3

Lucyn

Valued Member
Messages
426
Reaction score
202
Points
83
Experience
2 years
I always kept mine between 84-86.
Yeah, it's funny, if you go on Simply Discus and ask around, you'll get 50/50 answers, but both end up working fine. I've always thought 84 was good since I have other fish in there, but I might be able to push that even further down with benefits.
 

RollaPear

Valued Member
Messages
93
Reaction score
106
Points
68
My aim is 28C/82F

I'm not sure how that effects growth or behavior, I'm a little too inexperienced with discus I guess, but even at the "lower" end of the discus temp scale I find that my discus are still playful, eat vigorously and fight a little too much. My main concern when it comes to temp is oxygen. I read somewhere (I think it was simplydiscus) that at that 82-88 that the oxygen is 50% of what it would be at average tropical tank temps of 77F/25C so personally I go for as much surface agitation as possible.

 

jpm995

Well Known Member
Messages
1,069
Reaction score
138
Points
108
Experience
More than 10 years
I've always thought that the temp where their found to be misleading. Animals have to adapt to surronding conditions but thats not necessarily the best for them. People in Alaska wont die if they move to Florida. I've had many tropicals [cardinal tetras, emperior tetras and many others] in an unheated tank [room temp kept around 70 degrees] that thrived and bred for over 20 years.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #6

Lucyn

Valued Member
Messages
426
Reaction score
202
Points
83
Experience
2 years
My aim is 28C/82F

I'm not sure how that effects growth or behavior, I'm a little too inexperienced with discus I guess, but even at the "lower" end of the discus temp scale I find that my discus are still playful, eat vigorously and fight a little too much. My main concern when it comes to temp is oxygen. I read somewhere (I think it was simplydiscus) that at that 82-88 that the oxygen is 50% of what it would be at average tropical tank temps of 77F/25C so personally I go for as much surface agitation as possible.

Thank you for your input, makes me feel better about transitioning to lower temps :) . Oxygen was always a main concern of mine, because it's not something that could be measured, usually, unlike toxins like Nitrites, Nitrates etc.
I've always thought that the temp where their found to be misleading. Animals have to adapt to surronding conditions but thats not necessarily the best for them. People in Alaska wont die if they move to Florida. I've had many tropicals [cardinal tetras, emperior tetras and many others] in an unheated tank [room temp kept around 70 degrees] that thrived and bred for over 20 years.
That is true, if you go into their natural environment, there will be 10 degree differences within 50 ft of eachother.
 

jpm995

Well Known Member
Messages
1,069
Reaction score
138
Points
108
Experience
More than 10 years
It would be great if they had scientific data to support recommendations. How does temp effect heart rate, breathing and organ functions. I guess its not worth it financially to research this. Im always spectial when people insist that a certain conditition [temp, water params[ph], food, etc] must be what they feel is correct.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #9

Lucyn

Valued Member
Messages
426
Reaction score
202
Points
83
Experience
2 years
It would be great if they had scientific data to support recommendations. How does temp effect heart rate, breathing and organ functions. I guess its not worth it financially to research this. Im always spectial when people insist that a certain conditition [temp, water params, food, etc] must be what they feel is correct.
Very true. When you think about it, fish are designed to never show weakness, or feeling under the weather. They may look visibly fine, but there's no way to truly tell if there's any distress. Of course, situations like bad parameters and diseases are impossible to hide because of the gravity of the discomfort, but you get the point.
You're welcome @Lucyn

I think 28C is the lowest I would go.
Yeah I think I'm gonna start setting the heater now to a max of 83.5 and a minimum of 82.5 for now on, we'll see how it goes :) Especially since they're starting to become adults, my babies are growing up :(
 

86 ssinit

Fishlore VIP
Messages
4,562
Reaction score
3,804
Points
308
Experience
More than 10 years
82 is fine for adult fish and a non breeding tank. Keepers have learned that 84 and higher the fish do better and breed more with more fry surviving. Remember these are not wild fish. These are almost man made fish now. The colors you see you do not see in the wild. Wild caught fish may be able to take the lower temps but our store bought can not. Again 82 is ok but lower will cause harm to your fish. That is lower on a regular basis. Like 78 all the time. Younger fish even in 82 may end up stunted. They may stress and not eat. But again as most discus keepers know this also can happen in the higher temps. Discus are not an easy fish to keep. They need a lot of work. There’s no getting around it. Yes there’s people who go against the grain and do it there way with success but there fish are never like those who play by the rules. There is no book on successful discus keeping in the high 70s. There’s no book on successful discus keeping with angelfish. Also no instructions on just changing the water when the nitrates are high. People do it the fish live but again look nothing like those kept in the right conditions with the right tank mates.
Discus will tell you when they're not happy. They show black stress lines or start turning black.
 

jmaldo

Well Known Member
Messages
2,946
Reaction score
3,933
Points
308
Experience
2 years
Short timer here with "Discus"
After quite a bit of research, the consensus was 82 - 86, so I keep mine @ 84.
According to my supplier the fry were raised @ 86. I have a young pair that spawn continually @ 84. Still no fry they keep eating the eggs. Once I know I have a viable pair (wigglers). Might just up the temp to 86?

Discus will tell you when they're not happy.
Agree, if you pay attention.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #13

Lucyn

Valued Member
Messages
426
Reaction score
202
Points
83
Experience
2 years
I recently made the change from 84-85 to 82-83 two weeks ago, I haven't really noticed a single change. I guess it doesn't really matter too much as long as it's in that range of 82-86? Maybe a huge variable is also the suppliers they come from/genetics in general. I currently have a smaller guy in the group, 3.5 inches, and his bars show just as much as they did before, if not less.
 

RollaPear

Valued Member
Messages
93
Reaction score
106
Points
68
I have a bit of an update in terms of temp. I have been battling fluke for the past month/five weeks. I'd dose the tank and be free of it and then, eventually it'd make a return. I tried upping the temperature from 28C to 30C and it seems fluke can not survive at the higher temp. So I'll be keeping my tank at 30C / 86F from now on.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #15

Lucyn

Valued Member
Messages
426
Reaction score
202
Points
83
Experience
2 years
I have a bit of an update in terms of temp. I have been battling fluke for the past month/five weeks. I'd dose the tank and be free of it and then, eventually it'd make a return. I tried upping the temperature from 28C to 30C and it seems fluke can not survive at the higher temp. So I'll be keeping my tank at 30C / 86F from now on.
Too add on, I learned it's always good with new Discus to keep their temps at 86F or higher to not only combat disease like you're doing, but to get their appetites going as well. I ran a little experiment on Discus from the same suppliers, same sizes, the one at 82 degrees took 3-4 days to eat. The other one which I kept at 88 degrees ate around 24 hours after acclimation. Could mean absolutely nothing considering the numerous amount of variables, but something to consider when getting new Discus, I suppose.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom