Help Did I make the right call?

Guppy43

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Recently my 5g shrimp tank has been over run by tiny snails which appeared all of a sudden which caused numbers of shrimp to die daily. My guess was due to the ammonia they produce and the oxygen they steal from the shrimp.

I bought 2 assassin snails and threw them in without thinking and now I’m worried they might go for my shrimps whose number are crippled due to the deaths.

My tank’s a 5g with a single bubble filter placed in a tiny box and buried in gravel.
Stocking is 2x indostomus spinosus, 20+x dwarf shrimps(3 was seen berried) with the addition of the new 2 Assassins.

Picture as follows
Image1573445841.946775.jpg
 

Asomeone

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Recently my 5g shrimp tank has been over run by tiny snails which appeared all of a sudden which caused numbers of shrimp to die daily. My guess was due to the ammonia they produce and the oxygen they steal from the shrimp.

I bought 2 assassin snails and threw them in without thinking and now I’m worried they might go for my shrimps whose number are crippled due to the deaths.

My tank’s a 5g with a single bubble filter placed in a tiny box and buried in gravel.
Stocking is 2x indostomus spinosus, 20+x dwarf shrimps(3 was seen berried) with the addition of the new 2 Assassins.

Picture as follows
While I know the struggle of having a tank overrun with snails...they produce such a small bioload it is unlikely they killed shrimp unless your tank was so close to the tipping point of being unbalanced that they just knocked that last pin over. Assassin snails will not kill shrimp...nor will they likely kill any offspring. They are snails after all and are rather slow.
Its likely you have something else in the tank that caused the shrimp to die.
 

Ebreus

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No experience on keeping shrimp with assassins but I've heard a few of the shrimp keepers here say they've successfully kept them together. Only time I've heard one of them say an Assassin got a shrimp was with a large colony of Red Cherries, he chalked it up to stupid shrimp syndrome.
 

Asomeone

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While nurtient spikes can indicate a plant growth hike...Plants dont just pop up...its possible there was an ammonia spike and the plants took advantage, but while the plants grew the shrimp died since plants wont control ammonia levels.
 
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Guppy43

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While I know the struggle of having a tank overrun with snails...they produce such a small bioload it is unlikely they killed shrimp unless your tank was so close to the tipping point of being unbalanced that they just knocked that last pin over. Assassin snails will not kill shrimp...nor will they likely kill any offspring. They are snails after all and are rather slow.
Its likely you have something else in the tank that caused the shrimp to die.
I can only think of that as a reason, I did buy some blue bolts a couple weeks which died.
I left them in the tank but didn’t feed the tank that day. The remaining shrimp should have cleared that out as the remains were gone by end of day.

No experience on keeping shrimp with assassins but I've heard a few of the shrimp keepers here say they've successfully kept them together. Only time I've heard one of them say an Assassin got a shrimp was with a large colony of Red Cherries, he chalked it up to stupid shrimp syndrome.
Hopefully non of my shrimps have that illness
 

Asomeone

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Okie. so.
From what I'm gathering from your practices you dont regularly clean your tanks and leave it up to your shrimp to clean up the mess. I know this sounds really rude but I dont mean it like that...cause I've done the same thing and the result is a loss of stock.
Please correct me if Im wrong but shrimp just like our fish require normal water changes. They really dont eat as much as we think despite food going missing. I feed a colony of 30+ cherries 4 pellets of cichlid food once every couple days and they continue to produce offspring. that being said this is a heavily planted tank that can handle just about anything thrown at it.
That being said If youre overfeeding that can contribute to ammonia and if anything died in the tank remnants that you didn't see could have further upped the levels.
I would highly suggest to test your water and go from there if ammonia and nitrates are negligible then okay we have a disease or parasite issue. but otherwise...its just poor maintenance.
 
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Guppy43

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Okie. so.
From what I'm gathering from your practices you dont regularly clean your tanks and leave it up to your shrimp to clean up the mess. I know this sounds really rude but I dont mean it like that...cause I've done the same thing and the result is a loss of stock.
Please correct me if Im wrong but shrimp just like our fish require normal water changes. They really dont eat as much as we think despite food going missing. I feed a colony of 30+ cherries 4 pellets of cichlid food once every couple days and they continue to produce offspring. that being said this is a heavily planted tank that can handle just about anything thrown at it.
That being said If youre overfeeding that can contribute to ammonia and if anything died in the tank remnants that you didn't see could have further upped the levels.
I would highly suggest to test your water and go from there if ammonia and nitrates are negligible then okay we have a disease or parasite issue. but otherwise...its just poor maintenance.
I clean my tanks weekly every saturday or sunday although for my shrimp tank I’m more careful as I don’t want to mess up the chemistry so I do 10% water changes of remaining water bi-weekly so I refill around 15%-20% on cleaning days(water is treated with Seachem Safe), I do top up if water levels drop too low. The tank’s quite established going for around a year now and starting with only 8 shrimp. I gave the rough count for 20+ but the actual numbers could be 30-40 as its almost every 2-3 weeks a new batch of shrimp hatch and most shrimpets stick to the mess of frogbit making it hard to do a count.
On a lighter side, the frogbit mess is so uncontrolled that I lost on of the assassin snails in it, I had thought it crawled out but it was hidden in between two overlapping leaves



Feeding wise I feed daily with hikari sinking predator pellets or oceanfree supercrustanourish, 2 pellets randomly.
 

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I would still check your water parameter weekly, you may have either an ammonia spike or a nitrite spike that can kill the rest. For the snails i read that they dont mess with the shrimps unless they are starved
 

Asomeone

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I would still check your water parameter weekly, you may have either an ammonia spike or a nitrite spike that can kill the rest. For the snails i read that they dont mess with the shrimps unless they are starved
Ya gotta start somewhere right...I would just test the paramters and ensure everything is okay.
 

Momgoose56

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I didn’t check parameters but as the frogbits were overgrowing again I assumed the ammonia had spiked.
You shouldn't have any ammonia spikes in a cycled tank unless you're grossly overfeeding, leaving dead carcasses in the tank to rot and never removing dead plant matter and detritus. I agree with @Asomeone, plus you've just added two more snails that will add to the bioload. I think the whole problem with your shrimp dying is probably poor water quality due to a lack of adequate tank maintenance, not snails. I must say though, I do really love your Frogbit. That tank would look even more awesome with some low light plants on the floor, like some java fern and anubias and your shrimp would like it too.
 
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Guppy43

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You shouldn't have any ammonia spikes in a cycled tank unless you're grossly overfeeding, leaving dead carcasses in the tank to rot and never removing dead plant matter and detritus. I agree with @Asomeone, plus you've just added two more snails that will add to the bioload. I think the whole problem with your shrimp dying is probably poor water quality due to a lack of adequate tank maintenance, not snails. I must say though, I do really love your Frogbit. That tank would look even more awesome with some low light plants on the floor, like some java fern and anubias and your shrimp would like it too.
But there is anubis
Bottom left
 

Asomeone

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You got your answer dude. I hope you at least test before assuming plants will care for the issue.
 
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Guppy43

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I clean my tanks weekly every saturday or sunday although for my shrimp tank I’m more careful as I don’t want to mess up the chemistry so I do 10% water changes of remaining water bi-weekly so I refill around 15%-20% on cleaning days(water is treated with Seachem Safe), I do top up if water levels drop too low. The tank’s quite established going for around a year now and starting with only 8 shrimp. I gave the rough count for 20+ but the actual numbers could be 30-40 as its almost every 2-3 weeks a new batch of shrimp hatch and most shrimpets stick to the mess of frogbit making it hard to do a count.
On a lighter side, the frogbit mess is so uncontrolled that I lost on of the assassin snails in it, I had thought it crawled out but it was hidden in between two overlapping leaves
Latest cleaning was yesterday, I also dropped a few activated carbon chips to help.

You got your answer dude. I hope you at least test before assuming plants will care for the issue.
Gonna test when I reach home for sure
Should I also increase my cleaning schedule from the above?
 

GuppyDazzle

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I clean my tanks weekly every saturday or sunday although for my shrimp tank I’m more careful as I don’t want to mess up the chemistry so I do 10% water changes of remaining water bi-weekly so I refill around 15%-20% on cleaning days(water is treated with Seachem Safe), I do top up if water levels drop too low. The tank’s quite established going for around a year now and starting with only 8 shrimp. I gave the rough count for 20+ but the actual numbers could be 30-40 as its almost every 2-3 weeks a new batch of shrimp hatch and most shrimpets stick to the mess of frogbit making it hard to do a count.
On a lighter side, the frogbit mess is so uncontrolled that I lost on of the assassin snails in it, I had thought it crawled out but it was hidden in between two overlapping leaves
When I'm "more careful" with a tank, that means I'm doing more water changes, not less.

You do want to mess with the chemistry if you have toxins building up, and that sounds fairly likely. You can't know for sure unless you test the water.

If you're topping off tanks that means there hasn't been a water change for a while. I honestly believe your solution is more frequent, higher volume water changes.

The plants are growing like mad. That means the water is heavy with nutrients. That suggests there's a good chance the water is also heavy with toxins.

API Master Test Kit and get aggressive with partial water changes as you figure this out. My two cents.
 

Momgoose56

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But there is anubis
Bottom left
Ah, I see! I suspect, from the tiny amount of water you've been exchanging every week, the fact that you leave dead animals in the tank and that you "top off" the tank for the last year that your nitrates, not ammonia are very high. Test your water.
I would say, you should be doing water exchanges of 10-15% at least 3 times a week, vacuuming gravel every time for awhile, and removing dead carcasses when you see them. And only "topping off" your tank with distilled (RO) water. What "carbon" are you using and where ddid.you put it? Carbon only removes certain chemical residues like antibiotics, pesticides etc. It does not remove ammonia, nitrites or nitrates. It doesn't do anything to clean a tank.
 
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