Did First Water Change And 3 Of 6 Fish Died

Zerokyo2

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My tank is recently cycled, and i did my first water change 15/20% of the water. Added Seachem Prime as well as Stability as soon as water filled and kept temp pretty much the same (heater turned on only a few minutes). But as soon as i looked, i had one dead Danio and two others breathing heavily up at the top (looking almost stunned) within an hour, another died. Noting that i have three swimming at the bottom very actively. I did remove two plants that were dying(a little rot as well) Thoughts on this? did i change too much water? maybe removing the plants also changed the water chem?
 

Wraithen

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My tank is recently cycled, and i did my first water change 15/20% of the water. Added Seachem Prime as well as Stability as soon as water filled and kept temp pretty much the same (heater turned on only a few minutes). But as soon as i looked, i had one dead Danio and two others breathing heavily up at the top (looking almost stunned) within an hour, another died. Noting that i have three swimming at the bottom very actively. I did remove two plants that were dying(a little rot as well) Thoughts on this? did i change too much water? maybe removing the plants also changed the water chem?
It sounds like you added your prime after filling the tank. If that's the case, any ammonia or chlorine in your water would have already done some damage to your fish. Also, do you happen to know your tap ph and tank ph? Water fluctuates a lot from the tap, especially in the summer months. You could have had a ph swing from differing water between the tap and the tank. This could also have caused it. Anytime something looks off, test with every thing you can. If it happens right after a water change, test both tap and tank. Some municipalities will also flush lines and dump a ton of extra chemicals in the water seemingly without notice. I once lived in a place where a pump failed and the backup pump didnt kick on. They didnt notice for about 4 hours so a water tower tank was left half empty for that long. They freaked and put out a boil notice for 3 days as a precaution. They were dumping tons of extra chloramines in the water for those 3 days and the following day.

Lastly, if you dont have a thermometer, if you are using by buckets, make sure the water feels the exact same between the bucket and the tank. If using a faucet with a python, you can try to do this, but a thermometer makes it much easier.
 
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Zerokyo2

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@Wraithen I did add prime "after" i added the water into tank. And that is true, i have about .25ppm ammonia from the tap. Ph is steady around 7.5 from tap as well as from tank. Temp (i use python, and run the water from faucet and check temp before i actually put water back in to try to keep around same temp)

I let my tank settle for a little over an hour, i tested everything. Every reads the same except "ammonia" which i knew was going to be around .25ppm since that's coming fro the tap.
PH- 7.2 - 7.5
KH - 4
GH - 12
Ammonia - .25ppm
Nitrite - 0
Nitrate 10-20 PPM
 

Wraithen

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@Wraithen I did add prime "after" i added the water into tank. And that is true, i have about .25ppm ammonia from the tap. Ph is steady around 7.5 from tap as well as from tank. Temp (i use python, and run the water from faucet and check temp before i actually put water back in to try to keep around same temp)

I let my tank settle for a little over an hour, i tested everything. Every reads the same except "ammonia" which i knew was going to be around .25ppm since that's coming fro the tap.
PH- 7.2 - 7.5
KH - 4
GH - 12
Ammonia - .25ppm
Nitrite - 0
Nitrate 10-20 PPM
What's your temp? I doubt it was enough ammonia to actually kill a few fish, but it's possible that it finished them off enough before you added the prime. Especially if they keep getting exposed like this over a long period of time.
 
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Zerokyo2

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@Wraithen Temp is 78-79 degrees, before i added water i turned faucet on and confirmed with a separate therm that it was around the same temp. Once water filled up, i believe heater only turned on for maybe 5 minutes and then turned off.

Looks like i will be filling up water 5 gallons at a time and adding prime and letting it sit and slowly add water back into tank. hopefully that will keep fish from dying.
 

Momgoose56

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@Wraithen Temp is 78-79 degrees, before i added water i turned faucet on and confirmed with a separate therm that it was around the same temp. Once water filled up, i believe heater only turned on for maybe 5 minutes and then turned off.

Looks like i will be filling up water 5 gallons at a time and adding prime and letting it sit and slowly add water back into tank. hopefully that will keep fish from dying.
Tap chlorine typically won't kill fish that fast. What was your nitrate level before the water change? How were your fish that died acting just prior to their death?
It sounds more like the fish might have been injured or exposed to some kind of trauma or toxin during the water change. A simple water change shouldn't kill fish.
 

Wraithen

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@Wraithen Temp is 78-79 degrees, before i added water i turned faucet on and confirmed with a separate therm that it was around the same temp. Once water filled up, i believe heater only turned on for maybe 5 minutes and then turned off.

Looks like i will be filling up water 5 gallons at a time and adding prime and letting it sit and slowly add water back into tank. hopefully that will keep fish from dying.
You can add the prime to the tank right before filling.
 
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Zerokyo2

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Tap chlorine typically won't kill fish that fast. What was your nitrate level before the water change? How were your fish that died acting just prior to their death?
It sounds more like the fish might have been injured or exposed to some kind of trauma or toxin during the water change. A simple water change shouldn't kill fish.
Nitrates were 10-20ppm before water change, and basically the same after (not very good about telling the colors, but definitely light orange). The fish were fine honestly, i guess the only thing to note is they were pecking at the syphon hose while i was changing the water, but they would peck at my fingers when I'm messing with something in the tank too. The zebra danio were all very lively, so it was definitely weird three died pretty instantly. the other three we just going about their business.

@Wraithen I'll try that as well, just wasn't sure how long prime would stay in the tank for when i added new tap water.
 

coralbandit

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Something else went wrong besides the timing of prime ..
I change 90% on fish that are 'sensitive ' according to most and add my safe [ dry version of prime] after sometimes like 30 -45 minutes !
More then a few breeders know enough to offer their fish a quick free bath in something that will kill parasites far faster then fish like chlorine and have never had issues .
I would suspect if this was first time use of some equipment it may have had something in/on it or user error ?
I would like to say temperature killed them but it surely was not too cold for danios as they don't even need the heater or really enjoy the upper 70s much anyways ...
I would run your python into a 5g bucket in the tub with a thermometer in it so you can get temp right while it safely overflows in the future ..
 

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Any chance that your house...like mine...delivers scalding hot water if some miscreant flushes a toilet while the tap is running or the washing machine starts drawing water?
 

DrWigglespank

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I killed a Bala Shark by dumping some dechlorinator directly into the tank. It thought I was feeding them and it swam through the stuff as soon as I dropped it in. It immediately started convulsing & was dead in about 30 seconds. That was a hard lesson, but anything I put in the tank after that got diluted in at least a gallon of water before dumping it in the tank.

This was about 20 years ago. It was my first aquarium and I really had no idea what I was doing. I just followed directions on the bottle and dumped a few caps full in the tank after a water change. When I look back at all the things I did wrong with that tank, it's a wonder any of my fish survived at all.
 

Momgoose56

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I killed a Bala Shark by dumping some dechlorinator directly into the tank. It thought I was feeding them and it swam through the stuff as soon as I dropped it in. It immediately started convulsing & was dead in about 30 seconds. That was a hard lesson, but anything I put in the tank after that got diluted in at least a gallon of water before dumping it in the tank.

This was about 20 years ago. It was my first aquarium and I really had no idea what I was doing. I just followed directions on the bottle and dumped a few caps full in the tank after a water change. When I look back at all the things I did wrong with that tank, it's a wonder any of my fish survived at all.
Dechlorinators have probably come a long way in since the 80's and 90's. I run water in my tank with a python hook and squirt half the dechlorinator (6-7 ml for about 25 gallons) directly into the water flow entering the tank with a 10 ml syringe when I start the hose and the other 6 or 7 ml when the fill is almost complete. My Cichlids and rainbowfish swim through the dechlorinator (that's probably filled by the water flow) frequently and I've never lost one because of that. I use pond strength dechlorinator because it's more concentrated than regular dechlorinator and lasts longer with big tank->big water changes.
 
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