Diamond headed tetra large belly area?

buckystanton

Hi fish folks

As per the title I have a diamond headed tetra who has a significantly larger belly than all the other tetras. I don't see any raised scales or lethargy or difficulty swimming and breathing (dropsey) and the fish is behaving pretty much like every other tetra but perhaps a little bit defensive and mean but its hard to tell.
Apologies that I couldn't get the fish in focus for too long but I'm hoping the video format makes up for it.


As you can see from the video my tank is heavily planted -- I'm an anthropologist and I was gone for three months on research so it was about 5X more grown in than this a week or so ago. Water conditions are as perfect as can be but I also run purigen to be safe.

Any ideas on whats up with this beautiful tetra? Should I be worried and isolate, attempt treatment? If so, for what?
 

JuDom

Hi There.
First of all, lovely tank! Your fish look happy and vibrant.
I think this little guy has simply had too much to eat and might be a little constipated too.
Do you have a breeder net, critter carrier, anything like that you can float in the tank to keep him separate for a few days?
I think fasting him for 2-3 days should clear the issue up but I wouldn’t want you to fast all the fish.
As a side note, I also find that my neons go after the algae wafers I drop in for my snails and otos so he could just be a little piggy like mine. :hilarious:
 

buckystanton

Re: tank, thanks!!!! While I do obsess about the scape its much more important that my little aqua pals seem happy and healthy :) Side note, re-watching the video I'm dying at the pygmy cory in the back who tries to sit on a plant for 20-30+ seconds and then gives up lol

Anyhow, I went to the LFS and got a net-box thing. After much work I have gotten him (I think) into the box. I think you are correct re: feeding. I just got back from a three month research trip where my directions were to feed less than I would normally because I assumed overfeeding but the person who took care of it did a very precise job. SO, all of them were looking slightly thin and I've been feeding a bit extra since I came home a week ago -- including some algae wafers for the pygmy corys who seemed thinnest.

In summary, I think the fish in question is the alpha as he is the most aggressive and largest already. Thus, he hogs a lot of the food and has been eating too much and I'm feeding a little too much. I'll update the thread in a few days with an update.

Thanks so much for your help, I really appreciate it.
 

JuDom

No problem! :)
Glad you popped some plants in the breeders net for him/her to feel comfy while he/she loses the weight :hilarious:

Since I have a similar problem in my 29g community, I will recommend feeding your flakes first and after they’ve gobbled that up and go about their business, drop a few wafers wherever your cories are hanging out. I find it helps all levels of my tank eat well when I do it that way.
The Otos in my experience are pretty self sufficient in finding whatever is leftover from my other fish and they always have fat tummies too.

Glad I could help. :D
 

chromedome52

"Him" is a her, she's full of eggs and ready to breed. If no males seem interested, female tetras may release eggs without a male present, or may re-absorb them. If they stay in her body too long, she might become eggbound, which will present much the same as bloat, and kill her.
 

JuDom

"Him" is a her, she's full of eggs and ready to breed. If no males seem interested, female tetras may release eggs without a male present, or may re-absorb them. If they stay in her body too long, she might become eggbound, which will present much the same as bloat, and kill her.
I did not even think of that possibility!
Does this mean it’s the opposite of a good idea to separate her?
 

chromedome52

Yes, it is better to leave her with the males and hope they realize what's happening.
 

JuDom

Yes, it is better to leave her with the males and hope they realize what's happening.
How do you differentiate between bloat and filled with eggs?
I hope the OP comes back and sees your comment because obviously he is following my advice to separate her..:confused:
 

BradleyH2O

Welcome to the forum! Looks pregnant to me as well. Beautiful tank my friend.
 

JuDom

Welcome to the forum! Looks pregnant to me as well. Beautiful tank my friend.
Oh geez. I really hope OP comes back now to see this info.
I only recommended QT for 2-3 days considering I assumed it was bloat or constipation.
Still curious how you tell the difference?
Oh geez. I really hope OP comes back now to see this info.
I only recommended QT for 2-3 days considering I assumed it was bloat or constipation.
Still curious how you tell the difference?
Is it the shape of the belly?
I know livebearers get that square shape when they’re close to giving birth but I’ve never had the experience with a tetra or egg laying fish.
 

BradleyH2O

Oh geez. I really hope OP comes back now to see this info.
I only recommended QT for 2-3 days considering I assumed it was bloat or constipation.
Still curious how you tell the difference?

Is it the shape of the belly?
I know livebearers get that square shape when they’re close to giving birth but I’ve never had the experience with a tetra or egg laying fish.
Don’t take my word for it. I’m just an amateur hobbyist...what do I know? :)
 

JuDom

Don’t take my word for it. I’m just an amateur hobbyist...what do I know? :)
I could say the same for myself.
But I made the assumption off observation that it was bloat as opposed to a tummy full of eggs. That’s why I inquired about the visual difference between the two. :)
 

chromedome52

With bloat you see the bulge further forward, causing a notch in the body profile below the gill slits in severe cases. With eggs, the bulge is nearer the center of the fish, and slopes about the same at front and back. Bloated fish usually act abnormally early on, and this fish is obviously in no distress.
 

JuDom

With bloat you see the bulge further forward, causing a notch in the body profile below the gill slits in severe cases. With eggs, the bulge is nearer the center of the fish, and slopes about the same at front and back. Bloated fish usually act abnormally early on, and this fish is obviously in no distress.
Thank you very much for this info. :)
 

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