Deficiencies?

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Thida

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What’s wrong with my plants ?

They’ve always looked evenly green on JUST rocks gravel. After a month of changing the gravel for my red cherry shrimps with 9; i was so Eco Complete on the bottom, black sand and a few Fluval stratum on top layer the plants starts to turn yellow. (Yes I’m aware I’m not supposed to mix those two together but I have seen someone was able to mix them.). I was trying to provide the plants with nutrients and something for their roots to grab on as well as fulfill the shrimps preferred gravel. The black sand was just for me. This 20 gallons is now the home of guppies, 1 ghost shrimp, 2 snails, and frys.
 

CHIMERA

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They look okay to me, no serious deficiencies. However if you want to be extremely compulsive, yellowing of veins and edges is a Potassium deficiency. Pale-yellowish growth is an Iron deficiency, and light green growth with old yellow leaves is just a natural nitrogen deficiency.
Trust me, you are fine. As plants grow, coloration changes with the corresponding water conditions, or its just a natural maturation development.
 

-Mak-

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I see serious magnesium deficiency on those smaller plants with the darker veins and lighter surrounding leaf (s. repens?). Do you know your GH?
 

CHIMERA

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-Mak- said:
I see serious magnesium deficiency on those smaller plants with the darker veins and lighter surrounding leaf (s. repens?). Do you know your GH?
I would definitely say it’s not too serious. Not drop-everything serious. If it was in huge trouble, it would have more browning. As I can see, the veins are still more green than brown...
 

-Mak-

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CHIMERA said:
I would definitely say it’s not too serious. Not drop-everything serious. If it was in huge trouble, it would have more browning. As I can see, the veins are still more green than brown...
Some deficiencies don't cause browning, naturally plants should not have darker veins and yellowing leaves, so by the time it's visible it'll have already potentially caused stunting...
 

SeattleRoy

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Hi Thida,

Mak is on the correct path in that the interveinal chlorosis is a symptom except that the dark veins and interveinal chlorosis (normal dark veins lighter in between leaf veins) is happening on your new leaves rather than the older leaves. If it were the older leaves showing the same pattern, but the newer leaves looked normal it would likely be a magnesium deficiency. However the problem is with the newer leaves which indicates a non-mobile nutrient deficiency....in this case iron. I would suggest dosing Seachem Flourish Iron per the instructions on the bottle for 2-3 weeks. Watch the new leaves as they emerge (the existing leaves will change little if any), do the new leaves look better with little or no interveinal chlorosis then you are on the correct path. If the problem is resolved then great, if it is just better but not fully resolved after three weeks then try increasing the dose just a little and see if that resolves the deficiency.

The last picture shows a sword plant where the new leaves show the deficiency as well. In this case I see some leaf puckering, the new leaves appear to be stunted, it looks like some leaf tips have died and some leaf margins as well (is this correct?) and it is hard to tell but it looks like some leaf tips are bending /hooking downward (is this correct?). Possibly another picture of the sword plant would help be define the problem better. It is not iron in this case, but I suspect another non-mobile nutrient.
 
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Thida

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SeattleRoy said:
Hi Thida,

Mak is on the correct path in that the interveinal chlorosis is a symptom except that the dark veins and interveinal chlorosis (normal dark veins lighter in between leaf veins) is happening on your new leaves rather than the older leaves. If it were the older leaves showing the same pattern, but the newer leaves looked normal it would likely be a magnesium deficiency. However the problem is with the newer leaves which indicates a non-mobile nutrient deficiency....in this case iron. I would suggest dosing Seachem Flourish Iron per the instructions on the bottle for 2-3 weeks. Watch the new leaves as they emerge (the existing leaves will change little if any), do the new leaves look better with little or no interveinal chlorosis then you are on the correct path. If the problem is resolved then great, if it is just better but not fully resolved after three weeks then try increasing the dose just a little and see if that resolves the deficiency.

The last picture shows a sword plant where the new leaves show the deficiency as well. In this case I see some leaf puckering, the new leaves appear to be stunted, it looks like some leaf tips have died and some leaf margins as well (is this correct?) and it is hard to tell but it looks like some leaf tips are bending /hooking downward (is this correct?). Possibly another picture of the sword plant would help be define the problem better. It is not iron in this case, but I suspect another non-mobile nutrient.
Thank you, SeattleRoy.
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I did pour the Fluorish Excel (seachem) after I posted the question. I will go to the Petsmart to get some Flourish Iron tomorrow.

Above are all my plants in the tank. I just noticed the other java new leaves are turning yellow and old ones veins are visible. Hard to capture true picture with the lightings.
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Here are the pic of the stunted java.
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Thanks again for your time.
 
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Thida

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-Mak- said:
I see serious magnesium deficiency on those smaller plants with the darker veins and lighter surrounding leaf (s. repens?). Do you know your GH?
Hi Mak,
Yes, they are s. Repens. No, I do not know my GH. I just thought I messed their nutrients up with mixing those two fertilizer.

Also, maybe bec I rescape them often?!!!
 

jmaldo

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Thida The pic of your swords look exactly like mine. Thanks for posting the question and pics. I am going to increase the iron as suggested.
Thanks SeattleRoy and -Mak- Great info!
 

SeattleRoy

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Hi Thida,

It looks like the substrate is ADA Aquasoil, possibly Amazonia? ADA Aquasoils are good substrates but they do lack some nutrients plants require for healthy growth; calcium, boron, sulfur, and zinc to name a few.

The sword plant is difficult for me to diagnose. It looks like a Boron deficiency but those are pretty uncommon. It also looks a little like a calcium deficiency with the new leaves not developing properly (much more common). When you pick up your Seachem Flourish Iron also pick up some Seachem Equilibrium and Seachem Flourish Comprehensive.

Dose the Iron per the instructions. I want you to add 2 teaspoons of Seachem Equilbrium per 10 gallons of tank volume once; then if you do a water change add 2 teaspoons per 10 gallons of new water added. Then watch the new growth for the next 2 - 3 weeks. The existing leaves will change little if any at all. The new leaves that start emerging should looks better. The S. repens leaves should be an even green with slightly darker veins. Hopefully the new leaves of the sword will emerge and grow normally.

Hey Roy, what about the Seachem Flourish Comprehensive? Seachem Comprehensive contains small amounts of the macro-nutrients nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorus which your substrate already contains, however Comprehensive also contains most of the micro-nutrients that Amazonia does not have, especially the Boron. If the sword plant does not respond to the calcium in the Equilibrium then we will add dosing of Comprehensive to the dosing schedule as well. Keep us posted Thida! -Roy
 

Paradise fish

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Thida, your sword plant in the last picture... Is it a Rosette sword? If so, the plant is just transitioning from emersed form to submerged form. Rosette swords and Amazon swords have long leaf stems when grown out of the water, but have shorter ones when grown under. I suggest you clip off the emerse leaves so your plant can fully transition.
 
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Thida

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Thida, your sword plant in the last picture... Is it a Rosette sword? If so, the plant is just transitioning from emersed form to submerged form. Rosette swords and Amazon swords have long leaf stems when grown out of the water, but have shorter ones when grown under. I suggest you clip off the emerse leaves so your plant can fully transition.
Honestly, I don’t know what kind of sword they are. I just bought them from the pet store. What I do know is they weren’t wrinkly before I put them into the new combo substrates.
 

Paradise fish

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Pet store plant nurseries usually grow their plants emersed because they grow faster and they don't get algae. It takes the plant a few weeks to months to covert into the immersed form.
 
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