Deep Plant Substrate Negatives?

acjag

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What are or would be the negative results of having planted substrate to deep? Rooting of plants wouldn't be an issue so it must have something to do with filtration??????
 

Chanyi

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Which substrate are you specifically looking at?

No real danger... especially where roots form. Plants will transfer O2 down and release through roots to form symbiotic relationships with bacteria and fungi who use the oxygen, and in return create nutrient networks called hypha. Bacteria will mineralize organic material into plant-available forms of nutrients.
 

ystrout

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No issue. You actually want deep substrate for plants, it helps form a stronger root network. My betta tank only has 1.5 inches it's definitely not deep enough. I'd prefer another inch or two of substrate. My other tanks have much deeper substrate beds and the plants do a lot better.

If you're asking because you've heard about issues it can cause... You'll hear about deep substrate causing hydrogen sulfide pockets quite a bit in the fish keeping hobby. That actually only happens with sand and not gravel or plant substrate because of the anaerobic bacteria that can form under deep sand beds due to the lack of oxygen. Even then, I've read that as soon as the gas is released it becomes non-toxic as soon as it interacts with oxygen (in your water) so it really shouldn't cause an issue except an eggy smell until you do a water change. Lastly, I've never heard of anyone even getting these gas pockets. But technically it is possible with sand... Another reason not to worry is because you don't use sand to grow plants, you ideally use substrate made for plants (aquarium soil, Flourite, etc) or less ideally gravel, but rarely sand.
 
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acjag

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No issue. You actually want deep substrate for plants, it helps form a stronger root network. My betta tank only has 1.5 inches it's definitely not deep enough. I'd prefer another inch or two of substrate. My other tanks have much deeper substrate beds and the plants do a lot better.

If you're asking because you've heard about issues it can cause... You'll hear about deep substrate causing hydrogen sulfide pockets quite a bit in the fish keeping hobby. That actually only happens with sand and not gravel or plant substrate because of the anaerobic bacteria that can form under deep sand beds due to the lack of oxygen. Even then, I've read that as soon as the gas is released it becomes non-toxic as soon as it interacts with oxygen (in your water) so it really shouldn't cause an issue except an eggy smell until you do a water change. Lastly, I've never heard of anyone even getting these gas pockets. But technically it is possible with sand... Another reason not to worry is because you don't use sand to grow plants, you ideally use substrate made for plants (aquarium soil, Flourite, etc) or less ideally gravel, but rarely sand.
Awesome, you just explained in easy to understand terms. Anaerobic bacteria was my concern and this is what brought up the question. I do keep fish in my planted aquarium and it sounds as though if I choose to make substrate deeper in the back than the front I shouldn't have any issues. Thank You for your knowledge.
 

Wraithen

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Awesome, you just explained in easy to understand terms. Anaerobic bacteria was my concern and this is what brought up the question. I do keep fish in my planted aquarium and it sounds as though if I choose to make substrate deeper in the back than the front I shouldn't have any issues. Thank You for your knowledge.
If it was an issue, none of these scapers would just pile up substrate in the back. They would be crazy to do so.
 
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acjag

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If it was an issue, none of these scapers would just pile up substrate in the back. They would be crazy to do so.
Makes sense, I've watched you tube videos about scaping and never looked at the bigger picture until now that you mentioned it. This now gives me an idea about lighting. I could build my bottom up closer to surface where PAR value is higher. This all would be within reason though. My tank is only 12 inched wide.
 

Wraithen

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Makes sense, I've watched you tube videos about scaping and never looked at the bigger picture until now that you mentioned it. This now gives me an idea about lighting. I could build my bottom up closer to surface where PAR value is higher. This all would be within reason though. My tank is only 12 inched wide.
In a 12 inch wide tank, the high ground in the back will be key to make the tank look bigger than it is. Just be aware that a lot of substrates will self level, so you have to use some tricks to keep it pushed up in the back.

How deep is your tank? You dont need a crazy high par for freshwater plants. 30 to 40 par at the substrate will grow just about any plant, and plenty of algae without co2.
 
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acjag

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In a 12 inch wide tank, the high ground in the back will be key to make the tank look bigger than it is. Just be aware that a lot of substrates will self level, so you have to use some tricks to keep it pushed up in the back.

How deep is your tank? You dont need a crazy high par for freshwater plants. 30 to 40 par at the substrate will grow just about any plant, and plenty of algae without co2.
It's a 12 wide x 24 deep x 48 long. Algae really hadn't been a major issue until I most recently replaced the old standard single bulb T-8 with a Beamswork da 120 6500k LED. When I say not a major about algae is I feel the algae I was getting would be normal. Maybe everyother month I would pull some ornaments and clean them with hydrogen peroxide and good to go for other 1/4. The algae I had was red algae and couldn't every get it to just disappear. When viewing it in aquarium it's appearance was green but when killed with hydrogen peroxide it turned red and I've read that this algae that turns to red when dead comes from the red algae family. Now that I've increased my lighting dramatically I'm starting to get green spots on glass and clean up crew aren't very hard workers. They may need a pay cut or extra help. I only have two nerite snails and one chinese algae eater. For now though the algae hasn't been over whelming yet, I cut my lighting back an hour to about I think 8 1/2 to 9 hours a day. When I get new substrate my plan is to empty tank (keeping plants and fish in another tank temporarily) and clean with hydro and hot water to kill any and all red algae and start with new ECO Complete. I will have kept filter running in temp so I already have good beneficial bacteria established.
 
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