Dead bladder snails, new tank.

Howl0v0

Hello, one wk ago I set up a new tank kit. So its brand new. I put some plants in there and they came with snails, and a shrimp. I've been watching them grow. This morning I found some of the bladder snails belly up on the tank floor. They had been at the top of the water line, sometimes upside down sucking air and sometimes scooting from one wall to the other. They didn't go down to the tank floor, until... you know. So, I have read on here that snails are hardy and that other people have cycled a new tank without die off of invertebrates like this. So, whats up?

Fish-less cycle. Aqueon 10 gal tank kit. 120 w led hood. Small gravel. Seachem root tab. Aqueon dechlor. FritzZyme 7 but the concentrated version. Applied up to ten drops daily, till today now every two days. Fish food flakes everyday. I see what I believe is the bacteria building up in the sponge that sit in the HOB filter. I also have a sponge on the intake, although I do not see the same growth there. Maybe I am wrong and this white stuff on the sponge in HOB is not bacteria?

The snails are three days old, or around that age (time I got plants). I have on amazon sword with a root tab under it, two anubias, an unk plant, a marimo ball, a clump of java fern, and four not-so-healthy anacharis stems. The fern has produced shoots, the anubias has a pale new growth but with no deforming yet (I've seen it responding to the light), and the shoot is reaching into the gravel. the unk plant is showing signs of damage (the rep at petco SMASHED it into the bag) with cracks and losing green in its cells, but no dying or rotting, and new growth is being produced by a small offshoot that existed with the bought plant. The anacharis is the only plant with a decent amount of rotting. It looks like it is shock related, but I am monitoring the light response as well. It doesnt reach for light, which is worrying me into believing I am not producing enough light for it. It maintains healthy heads while older growth has melted away at the tips. It is not melting uniformly, which to me implies it is not failing completely, and i am monitoring the rate of the growth with a couple of shoots that already existed on the anacharis when I bought it.

I have not tested my water, because the test is in the mail. It's made it to my town already, so hopefully tomorrow I will have valuable data to infer more. Neither Petco or lfs had any :| I have changed the water three times since it was set up tuesday. Once I have the tests, I am sure I will be able to understand more clearly the problem, but I do want to make sure I have as much info as possible. Am I taking the correct steps so far?

Should I be sucking up the decayed food meticulously or is it necessary to let it rot in order to help the cycle along? When I've changed the water, some old food floats up and I see it has what looks like fungus hairs on it, like you get in the fridge on produce. Info dump as much as you want. This site has become a ridiculously good source of guidance to me. I love nothing more than to listen to all you independent scientists share data. And I'd really like my snails to stop dying. They are very nice to watch grow.
(as an aside, anyone with hard water compare snails to soft water-raised snails in terms of their growth rate? point me in the direction of that threat ).
Thank you for very much.
 

mattgirl

Welcome to Fishlore I am happy to see you have come out of lurkdom

Since this is a fishless cycle water changes won't have to be done as often as they would if there were fishes lives at stake. We can't actually see the bacteria we are growing so I'm not sure what you are seeing on your sponges. Probably just a thick layer of bio-film.

It is strange for bladder snails to die during the cycling process. They are normally almost bullet (cycling) proof. Is it at all possible for copper to have gotten in this tank at any time?

We will be able to help figure out where you are in the cycling process once you can share some numbers with us. Without numbers it will just be guesswork.
 
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JustAFishServant

Oh no...I'm so sorry. Inverts honestly are my favorite part of an aquarium! I very much enjoy watching my Planorbidae, Lymnaeidae, Physidae, Faunus...all of them!

I've been living in Colorado for the past 8 years (been in the hobby for over 10), where the water quality is always good. No chlorine, chloramines, ammonia, nitrites...anything added to the tap water. I still add dechlorinator just to be absolutely sure, but because of these naturally pristine conditions, I've never had to deal with the death of any Snails. I'm so sorry I can't help you out more, but I'm sure another friend will come to your rescue!
 
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Howl0v0

Welcome to Fishlore I am happy to see you have come out of lurkdom

Since this is a fishless cycle water changes won't have to be done as often as they would if there were fishes lives at stake. We can't actually see the bacteria we are growing so I'm not sure what you are seeing on your sponges. Probably just a thick layer of bio-film.

It is strange for bladder snails to die during the cycling process. They are normally almost bullet (cycling) proof. Is it at all possible for copper to have gotten in this tank at any time?

We will be able to help figure out where you are in the cycling process once you can share some numbers with us. Without numbers it will just be guesswork.

I am looking into buying a test today. I just happened to be reading about it elsewhere. I didn't realize copper is used in plumbing, and can leach when worn down, so i didn't consider that could be the source. This house has old plumbing ;-;.


Oh no...I'm so sorry. Inverts honestly are my favorite part of an aquarium! I very much enjoy watching my Planorbidae, Lymnaeidae, Physidae, Faunus...all of them!

I've been living in Colorado for the past 8 years (been in the hobby for over 10), where the water quality is always good. No chlorine, chloramines, ammonia, nitrites...anything added to the tap water. I still add dechlorinator just to be absolutely sure, but because of these naturally pristine conditions, I've never had to deal with the death of any Snails. I'm so sorry I can't help you out more, but I'm sure another friend will come to your rescue!

Thanks. nice to know i'm not too sensitive about these bottom dwellers.
Oh no...I'm so sorry. Inverts honestly are my favorite part of an aquarium! I very much enjoy watching my Planorbidae, Lymnaeidae, Physidae, Faunus...all of them!

I've been living in Colorado for the past 8 years (been in the hobby for over 10), where the water quality is always good. No chlorine, chloramines, ammonia, nitrites...anything added to the tap water. I still add dechlorinator just to be absolutely sure, but because of these naturally pristine conditions, I've never had to deal with the death of any Snails. I'm so sorry I can't help you out more, but I'm sure another friend will come to your rescue!
Hey, what do you think about low oxygen?
 
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