Question cycling tank

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dfisherman

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Same tank male Betta. Readings for last 5 days. 5/5 PH 7.2, Amm. 1.0, no2-50, no3-40. 5/6 PH 6.8, Amm. 1.0, no2-20, no3-40, 5/7 PH 6.6, Amm. 0.50, no2-10, no3-30, 5/8 PH 6.6, Amm.0.50, no2- 0.50, no3-40, 5/9 PH 6.6, Amm. 0.50, no2-0.25, no3-40. Do 40-50% water changes daily.
 

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5/5 PH 7.2, Amm. 1.0, no2-50, no3-40.
5/6 PH 6.8, Amm. 1.0, no2-20, no3-40,
5/7 PH 6.6, Amm. 0.50, no2-10, no3-30,
5/8 PH 6.6, Amm.0.50, no2- 0.50, no3-40,
5/9 PH 6.6, Amm. 0.50, no2-0.25, no3-40.
Definitely need to do a water change to get the NO3 down. As the ammonia and Nitrite are still present at those levels, I'd say your tank is still trying to cycle.
 
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Thanks, Will just keep testing and doing water changes daily and hope it cycles soon. Could the low PH be why it's taking a while?
 

jetajockey

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I suggest to cut back on feeding and make sure there's not a lot of stuff breaking down in the gravel, those readings seem to be pretty high for a lone betta. Whats your tap water readings?
 

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Your nitrate is a bit high. I would do two water changes a day for a few days. Ideally you want to keep your nitrate levels at below 20ppm. With a pH of 6.6 your cycle will slow a bit, but it will continue. However I would note that I am NOT recommending trying to raise your pH at all. As you can see by your recent readings, while cycling, pH will fluctuate so trying to adjust while cycling is pointless. It can also be dangerous if changes to your pH are done too much, too quickly. Your pH will stabilize once they cycle is complete. If your tap water has a higher pH than your tank then a few extra water changes should help to bring it up. In the words of Finding Nemo, just keep swimming! You'll get there.
 
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5/11 PH 6.8, Ammonia 0.50, no2-0, no3-20. My nitrites have been o for 2 days now. Why am I still getting ammonia readings. I'm not over feeding the Betta just eats 4-5 pellets a day right now and I hand feed him so I know he eats everything. Not vacuuming much waste out. Is it normal for the Ammonia to stick around a few days after no2 & no3 drop?
 

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It may be possible that your tank has cycled. Your tap has 1.0 ammonia and you are adding more to the tank with each water change. Have you tried using another ammonia free water source or RO/DI filtration to remove it before going into the tank?
 

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I am going to have to respectfully disagree. I don't believe your tank has cycled yet. Your nitrite has only been at zero for two days and even with ammonia readings in your tap water, your BB would compensate and be able to process the ammonia within 12-24 hours. With a low pH it generally takes a bit longer to cycle so personally I think you're right on track. Even with a higher pH 40+ days for a cycle is not uncommon. I would not suggest using any more spring water or RO water than you already are as that could lower your pH even more and that could be slowing you down already. Just keep doing what you're doing, you'll get there soon enough.
 

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I have never had a tank have high nitrates without being cycled. This is why I was thinking that it may have cycled and just be having issues with the added ammonia. I could be wrong, but thought trying a different water source that didn't add ammonia to the tank might be worth a try.
 
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When I 1st started the cycle about a month ago I used spring water. About 2 weeks ago I started adding more tap a little more each day. I.m now at about a 70% tap-30% spring. Eventually when tank has fully cycled I want to use tap only. I will give it another week or so, If no change I will go back to spring only. Just wanted to get away from that cost.
 

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You might want to consider giving your tank a bit more time. As I mentioned, with a low pH your cycle will progress at slower pace. When a pH is below 7.0 it slows the reproduction process of your bacteria which is a slow going process either way. They will continue to reproduce, it just takes a bit longer. Since your tap water has a pH of only 6.8-7.0 to begin with, too much spring water would ensure that your pH stays below that 7.0 mark. Ideally you'll want to be using your tap water as much as possible for ease as well as cost reasons. You don't want to have to skip a needed water change because you couldn't get spring water for whatever reason.

Prime is excellent for dealing with ammonia. Even though my tanks are cycled and I don't have any ammonia or nitrite in my tap I still use Prime as my regular conditioner. With it's high concentration it's the best bang for your buck IMO. The Prime will keep your ammonia and nitrite detoxed for the 24 hours in between your daily water changes. When your tank is done cycling it would be wise to continue with the Prime in your case due to the ammonia in your tap. It will detox the ammonia in your tap until the bacteria can process it, which as I mentioned earlier should happen rather quickly once the colony is strong enough.
 

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I agree, I use Prime too, Stress Coat uses a lot each time (compared to a few drops of Prime) and does not help with ammonia in the same way as Prime, which still allows the filter to get rid of it while keeping the fish safe. Prime is better for aiding the cycle IMO.
 
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I think I'm getting there slowly. My Ammonia was 0.25 today. It's hard to read the color chart on the API kit. Going to take a sample to LPS and let them test it. Thank you all for your help.
 
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After a tank has fully cycled, shouldn't your bacteria colony take care of any ammonia that would be in your tap water with water changes?
 
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