Covering filter intake, sponge or fine mesh cloth??

TClare

Member
My CIchlasomas have spawned, I wasn't expecting it just yet as I only got them as babies in September (instead of the keyhole cichlids I had ordered). So this tank was initially a community and not really set up for breeding. But as they have spawned and are so far looking after the eggs well I would like to see if I can raise any of the fry. The filter I have is a Jad (same as Boyu) canister EF 45, rated at 1,400 liters per hour, it does not have an adjustable flow. The tank is 120 cm x 40 by 50 high ( about 4ft x 16 x 19"), 240l or 65 gallons approx. I am wondering if I can cover the intake with either sponge or a fine mesh cloth to prevent fry being sucked up, or will this affect the filter flow rate too much? I do also have other issues. Recently I have moved all my pencilfish and neons to another tank as they started to disappear and I blame the cichlids. But I still have one other Cichlasoma in the tank (I am trying to rehome it) and 2 male Apistogrammas that I could potentially move to the other tank, though they might cause trouble there, as there is already a pair of cacatuoides in that tank. So I don't know if the parents will be ale to protect the fry from these other fish.
 

RayClem

Member
If you already have fry in the tank, you can use something like a piece of ladies nylon hose to cover the inlet to prevent fry form being sucked up. However, it will probably get clogged very quickly. Your canister filter has a pretty strong flow rate, so you need something to protect the fry.

I use filter sponges on the intakes of all my filters. They come in various sizes, but for your filter, you will need the large size. Make sure you get a sponge that is open only on one end. If you get one that is open on both ends, the fry can be sucked in the bottom end.

Here are the one I purchased from Amazon, but I do not know if they are available where you live. At least it will give you some idea what to look for.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B088F1XKLR/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The sponge will keep a lot of larger debris from entering your canister filter, which will reduce the maintenance requirements. However, when you see the flow rate from the canister starting to drop, shut off the pump, remove the sponge and rinse it out in used tank water or dechlorinated water to remove excess debris. Since it is a sponge, it will provide surface area for growth of beneficial bacteria. Thus, you only want to replace it when the sponge starts to deteriorate.
 

Betta'sAnonymous

Member
I have used nylon panty hose as a stop gap before til i could get a sponge for the i take, and yeah, the hose does clog up pretty quick.
 
  • Thread Starter

TClare

Member
Thank you for the replies, very helpful. I have a few days before they are free swimming so I‘ll see what I can do.
 

V1K

Member
We once bred scuds in a lab, and used a combination of sponge AND pantyhose to cover intakes. I wouldn't say they were clogging much, then again, the flow wasn't intense.
 

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