Could this desk hold a 75 gallon aquarium?

redmare

Found this desk on a local buy&sell page, I've been looking for something to put my new 75/80 gallon tank on. This seems really sturdy especially with the extra legs, it's solid oak. The tank is 48"x18", and the desk is 60"x34". What do you think? I would take the hutch off.
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Dennis57

I would say yes, especially if its solid oak.
 
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MrBryan723

If you could put a couple of long horizontal braces along the very back down low I would trust it a lot more. Mostly you don't want one of those legs to buckle under strain and it start making everything lean one direction. Oak is really solid stuff so it's a great find if you get it for a good price.
 
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AcornTheBetta

Found this desk on a local buy&sell page, I've been looking for something to put my new 75/80 gallon tank on. This seems really sturdy especially with the extra legs, it's solid oak. The tank is 48"x18", and the desk is 60"x34". What do you think? I would take the hutch off.
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I think it would.
 
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mimo91088

Probably would. I'm stupid so if I'm being totally honest, the way I'd test it is by jumping on it a bunch. I assume no liability for my statement.
 
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shoepic

A 75 gallon aquarium 48"x18"x21" weighs in around 850 pounds filled. I would err on the side of caution. At least talk to someone who knows cabinet making and ask what they think. If it should fail, it has the potential to kill someone. Good luck
 
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BigManAquatics

Probably would. I'm stupid so if I'm being totally honest, the way I'd test it is by jumping on it a bunch. I assume no liability for my statement.
The fun way is the BEST way!
 
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RonDarcy

Found this desk on a local buy&sell page, I've been looking for something to put my new 75/80 gallon tank on. This seems really sturdy especially with the extra legs, it's solid oak. The tank is 48"x18", and the desk is 60"x34". What do you think? I would take the hutch off.
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Does it help if I say I don't know? You said 75 to 80 gallons. You are hoping it can hold 1,000 pounds for probably 10 years. The table top is probably oak venier on who knows what boards. Do you have 8 close friends who can join and wiggle around on top of it to test it? I would be nervous about it, but it would be beautiful.
 
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mimo91088

Does it help if I say I don't know? You said 75 to 80 gallons. You are hoping it can hold 1,000 pounds for probably 10 years. The table top is probably oak venier on who knows what boards. Do you have 8 close friends who can join and wiggle around on top of it to test it? I would be nervous about it, but it would be beautiful.
Can't social distance 8 people on a desk. redmare , I do however see from your avatar that you have a horse.... Do with that observation what you will.
 
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ProudPapa

I have a desk that appears to be very similar. Mine only has the extra two legs at the front, for a total of six. If that's the case with yours also I'd definitely put some more vertical support toward the back. On mine I built two strong rectangular frames and put one on each side of the knee opening (in line with the center legs), so the center of the desk is supported in the front by the two original legs and in the middle and at the back by my additions. Since my modification is only visible looking inside the knee hole, or laying down on the floor, it doesn't hurt the appearance of the desk.
 
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redmare

Can't social distance 8 people on a desk. redmare , I do however see from your avatar that you have a horse.... Do with that observation what you will.
OMG yes I'll just stick my horse on the desk.
 
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redmare

I have a desk that appears to be very similar. Mine only has the extra two legs at the front, for a total of six. If that's the case with yours also I'd definitely put some more vertical support toward the back. On mine I built two strong rectangular frames and put one on each side of the knee opening (in line with the center legs), so the center of the desk is supported in the front by the two original legs and in the middle and at the back by my additions. Since my modification is only visible looking inside the knee hole, or laying down on the floor, it doesn't hurt the appearance of the desk.
This one does have the legs at the back for a total of 8. I think bracing the back is definitely a good idea. My dad's a woodworker and has a full shop and can help me do any modifications needed!
 
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ProudPapa

This one does have the legs at the back for a total of 8. I think bracing the back is definitely a good idea. My dad's a woodworker and has a full shop and can help me do any modifications needed!

Then I think that desk will work great. If your father is an experienced woodworker he will likely have a good idea about what reinforcement will be needed.
 
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Cherryshrimp420

Have you thought of a way to deal with moisture?
 
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redmare

Have you thought of a way to deal with moisture?
Beyond keeping a towel handy... not really. Any advice?
 
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Cherryshrimp420

Beyond keeping a towel handy... not really. Any advice?

Hmm, maybe cover the entire desk in a plastic tarp, or apply some water-proof coating? Im just not sure how much the wood will rot from all that water....
 
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redmare

Hmm, maybe cover the entire desk in a plastic tarp, or apply some water-proof coating? Im just not sure how much the wood will rot from all that water....
A waterproof sealant would be totally doable
 
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Zach72202

If you want something a bit safer, you could do a 33L (48x12x12) in the back there and the desk would double as a workspace and a great display!
 
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redmare

If you want something a bit safer, you could do a 33L (48x12x12) in the back there and the desk would double as a workspace and a great display!
I already have the tank! That would be awesome though
 
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Zach72202

I already have the tank! That would be awesome though
If you want to use the depth, you can find 45 frag tanks. Footprint of a 75g but only 12" tall! I got one for free a while back and I was going to use it for ropefish, but went another route! Really cool tank and also would weigh a lot less than a full 75g

Or Better yet! The zoo med low boy! Do a wicked shell dweller tank! It would even out the weight great!
 
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veggieshark

I am not so much concerned about the weight as much as I am concerned about the stability. I mean it will probably carry the weight, but it may be very weak if anything moves sideways (or there is nonuniformity in the way weight is distributed). I would check how the legs are attached to the table and reinforce the joints.
 
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redmare

I am not so much concerned about the weight as much as I am concerned about the stability. I mean it will probably carry the weight, but it may be very weak if anything moves sideways (or there is nonuniformity in the way weight is distributed). I would check how the legs are attached to the table and reinforce the joints.
This is what I'm thinking as well- I think I'll put some cross braces on the back as well as reinforcing.
 
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86 ssinit

For furniture I use buffet tables made from the 80s and before. Strong stuff. My concern is the tank won’t be resting over the front legs on the desk.
 
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Islandvic

redmare, my main concern if I were looking at the desk to hold a tank was to ensure all the connection points and fasteners were still solid and secure.

If it needs a couple of fasteners tightened up, not a big deal.

But after years of being moved around, just double check that any connection points between the frame and legs are not cracked.

After seeing numerous aquarium stands for 65, 75, 120, 125g etc etc at the big box pet stores made from 1/2" mdf and melanine, then something made of solid wood should hold up.
 
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Islandvic

...... but then I lightbulb went off...

redmare , You mentioned your dad being a wood worker with a shop full of tools....

With the time it will take to go pick up the desk, take it back to his shop to inspect it and make any mods to it, then give it a light sanding and give it a coat of new stain, you could have built a brand new stand for under $100.

A 4x8 sheet of Birch or Oak furniture grade plywood is about $54 @ Home Depot.

Then buy (4) 1x4 pine boards than can be used for the upper and lower trim. Im sure your dad has a router than can make the basic 1x4 trim boards look real nice.

The frame made from the 3/4" plywpod can be either screwed together with pocket holes or just glued together utilizing dado/rabbet cuts, or a combination of both.

In my opinion, All these DIY aquarium stands on YouTube using 2x4 frames is overkill, when quality 3/4" birch or oak will hold the weight with a safety factor still present.

If you look at factory Aqueon and Marineland stands they sell for their 125, 150, 180 tanks for example, they use 3/4" plywood stapled together.
 
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86 ssinit

When it comes to building your own. I’m a fan of more is better
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still under $200 in wood. And my $75 eathan Allen buffet for my 90 .
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redmare

So I went to see it and it was NOT going to be up to the task! It was wobbling with my dad and I sitting on it. I think I will try and get my dad's help to build a stand!
 
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Islandvic

Nothing wrong with 86 ssinit "more is better" approach.

If I were to build another stand, and it was 75g or larger, I would definitely double up some 3/4" birch or oak to make a 2x4, 2x6, or 2x8 equivalent framing on the corners.

I guess the main reason I didn't like using 2x4's for the main part of the frame when I built my first DIY stand for a 55g, is that 2x4's are not 100% true and straight.

If i had a planer, probably be a different story....
 
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