10 Gallon Tank Could I Have Oto's As Well?

Dinoknight

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My mother has a fully cycled 10 gallon tank with a male crowntail betta, and 6 neon tetras. She wants a non snail bottom feeder. I think that 3 otocinclus should be okay, but I would like a second opinion. Would 3 oto's be okay in a 10 gallon with the previously mentioned stock?

- Dino
 
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Dinoknight

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What would be the problem with the otos? And bettas torture shrimp if not eat them outright. I know, I've tried.

- Dino
 

AJE

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Dinoknight said:
What would be the problem with the otos? And bettas torture shrimp if not eat them outright. I know, I've tried.

- Dino
Ottos neeed a larger tank. Ghost shrimp are about the same size as a betta
 

Tol

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Otos are not really bottom feeders and they can be difficult to keep. They really do better I bigger tanks and in larger groups.
 
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Dinoknight

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AJE said:
Ghost shrimp are about the same size as a betta
Not when you buy them. And regardless, they still eat their various feelers. I have seen otos kept happily in 10g's. I am not speaking of foot long Chinese and Siamese algae eaters, I am speaking of Otocinclus, the fish that gets 2 or less inches long.
 

I like fish123

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Just because they are small doesn't mean they can be kept in small tanks.Here's my 1 cent. Keep whatever you want, even an oscar if you want in that 10 gallon, but if it doesn't meet it's care needs it will not be a happy fish and might die.The choice is yours, we can't stop you from doing something, we can only tell you what's right and what's wrong.
 

AJE

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Well said
I like fish123 said:
Just because they are small doesn't mean they can be kept in small tanks.Here's my 1 cent. Keep whatever you want, even an oscar if you want in that 10 gallon, but if it doesn't meet it's care needs it will not be a happy fish and might die.The choice is yours, we can't stop you from doing something, we can only tell you what's right and what's wrong.
 

abarb

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Dinoknight said:
I am not speaking of foot long Chinese and Siamese algae eaters, I am speaking of Otocinclus, the fish that gets 2 or less inches long.
Siamese algae eaters don't get a foot long. Otocinclus prefer more stability of the tank and more space then a 10 gallon. They are also not a bottom feeder but go all over the tank like a pleco. You could keep them but they won't live a good quality life. Also if you don't have a lot of algae and they don't learn to eat fish food/vegetables they will starve.
 
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Dinoknight

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1. I would never keep an oscar in anything less than a 30g. I'm not crazy. Also, Otos are algae feeders, like practically every other loricariid (e.g., plecos, panaques, farlowellas, otos) In chains they often end up being siamese and chinese algae eaters, and those I know are not bottom feeders after juvenile, not to mention, they get massive, but again, I am talking about the loricariid otocinclus. 2 inch long algae eater. Even the fishlore data base says so. they are a social fish, but they don't exactly need mass numbers. and sorry, I did not mean bottom feeder, I meant cleaner, and I know that they need more than just glass algae, I can feed them fine with algae wafers. And yes, siamese get somewhere like 6 inches long, in anycase, too large for the tank. I have had many people recommend otos for a group of 10 gallon cleaners. I also have a 36g available that they could be moved to if things went bad. but I do not expect problems. Please, unless you have kept them and actually have researched them, don't give advice on something you do not know about. I believe Fanatic said something about that once. However, knowing that I have a 36g to use as well, which is really what I am thinking about, would you suggest a group of otos for a 36g? I really thought they would be fine for a 10g. I have seen numerous people say that they can be kept in groups in 10g. I have told my mother about their various sensitivities, so she has decided against them.

- Dino
 

abarb

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Dinoknight said:
I would never keep an oscar in anything less than a 30g.
Even 30 gallon is not enough... they need something more like a 75 gallon. And I think he was just using it as an example.
Dinoknight said:
I meant cleaner
You shouldn't rely on a fish to clean. I think you meant algae eating fish (just assuming).
Dinoknight said:
would you suggest a group of otos for a 36g?
Depends on fish, plants, algae, etc.
 
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Dinoknight

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Sorry, abarb, I think 30 gallon is the bare minimum, for example, a growout tank, but 60 - 80g normally, but I do not rely on fish to clean, did mean algae eaters, I do several water changes a week, around 25% each. I know he was using it as an example. And sorry for the outburst, everyone, I do not mean to mistreat any fish, I do think that most of you have good ideas. However, until you explained why you though that, I had no way to know what I would be doing wrong. Most of the time I am not this stupid, but I really did think they were fine in a 10g, I was skeptical of them to begin with, I was trying to find something that is not going to be eaten or be too large, and the oto looked like a decent choice, certainly better than my mother putting several BN plecos. Normally I research fairly well, thanks for saving me a lot of trouble.

- Dino
 

86 ssinit

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I am a keeper of ottos and not a believer of them needing to be in big groups. I have a 45g with 3 in it and a 90 with 4. Ottos are a strange little fish. They need a planted tank with algae and micro film to eat. Yes after a time some may eat algae wafers. No guarantee they will. There’s just not enough algae in a 10gal for ottos. 30 would be the min for ottos.
Also the betta will probably bother the Otto too. Have you tried nerite snails?
 

goldface

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As a otocinclus owner (a successful one at that), yes, it could work. Will it work for you? I don't know.
 
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Dinoknight

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I am about to, as soon as I can convince my mother that they are better cleaners. not to mention free snacks for the tetras in the form of eggs (Don't worry, I will continue feedings

- Dino
 
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Dinoknight

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Nah. The otos in the area are low quality anyway. and I have no room for normal size cories, and all the pygmy cories in the area are wild caught (which I will not endorse, with the exception of hastatus because no one breeds it in captivity, so if you are breeding them that is fine, same with any other fish) so I will stick with snails. However, I do actually have a school of panda cories that I am slowly adding to the 36g. Trouble with the little buggers, in our area it has been a bad year for them in general.

- Dino
 

nikm128

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Also as an owner, I wouldn't keep them in less than a 20 because of how active they are, plus they're not really "cleaners". They do great with plants since the plant fiber is a great snack for them as well as the bio film that comes with an established tank. They are also very likely to be starving when you get them as the gut bacteria they need to eat properly dies in shipping, and they aren't properly fed at stores either.
On top of all that, they'll make a nice snack for a betta.
Yale Kim said:
Ottos are kind of sensitive, maybe try some cories or something like that.
A 10 gallon is too small for cory's, they're way too active
 

Tol

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I keep Otos, I have kept them in a 10 gal when it was my only tank. You can certainly do it, but it's a lot more rewarding in a bigger tank. They are social fish, they do much better in bigger groups, hence the bigger tank. They like lots of plants, especially broad leaf stuff like swords. They can be difficult to keep alive, especially at the beginning. They do best in a well established tank with plenty of biofilm and algae. Mine live in a 29 gallon and they are fine but they are sensitive to water conditions. The bigger the voulme, the easier that is to keep in check. Small tanks can swing quickly. This is the main reason I would suggest bigger than 10 gallon . 20 gallon is about the smallest I would personally have them in. They are fun little fish, but they are not all that easy. They can be super shy at times, especially if there is only 2 or 3. Big groups need lots of algae too or if you can get them going on something like Repashy, algae wafers or blanched veggies like zucchinI and cucumber. Mine won't eat wafers really at all. They eat zucchinI and occasionally the Repashy when there is no real algae around.
 
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Dinoknight

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Okay, I will just do snails, as cories aren't algae eaters either.

- Dino
 
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Dinoknight

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Ended up with a pair of nerites. they are currently acclimating at the moment. Thanks all!

- Dino
 

imba

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Great job on the nerites. They are prolific algae eaters! I keep only 1 in my 20 gallon and it is a algae chomping machine.

I also do not suggest keeping otos in anything less than a 20 gallon and preferably in larger groups. This is based on observing their behaviours throughout in different setups.

Also, otos also prefer cooler waters compared to bettas. There is really not much overlap in their ideal temperature requirements. Same with neons (but that is not the discussion here)
 
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Dinoknight

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Yeah, plus our water is awfully hard. Honestly, I'm surprised the neons have even survived, given the fact that they are neons, and the are soft water, but apparently they are fine. As for the snails, they are doing fine.

- Dino
 

Tol

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Dinoknight said:
Yeah, plus our water is awfully hard. Honestly, I'm surprised the neons have even survived, given the fact that they are neons, and the are soft water, but apparently they are fine. As for the snails, they are doing fine.

- Dino
I think a lot of that may be due to the fish coming from LFS that have similar water to ours. My water is on the hard side and my pH is around 7.8. My Otos and Neons do fine in it.
 
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Dinoknight

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You from west coast portland? We have incredibly hard water, on average. My cories and WCMM seem not to care, neither do any other of the fish, despite the fact that every one of my fish is soft water. In other news, apparently there was another snow storm today that hit most of oregon, yet missed the willamette valley yet again. It screwed up a whole bunch of things in the schools, but we stayed in school. Typical weather gods, denying those who want it most...

- Dino
 

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