Corydoras Pygmaeus Owners?

Verne
  • #1
Hey, I was hoping to hear about the experiences of anyone who owns pygmy cories. I'm looking into them and I keep seeing conflicting answers. Could you please tell me what tank size you keep them in, what size shoals you have and what tankmates, if any? I keep seeing between 5-29 gallons recommened as the minimum for them and from 5-12 as the minimum shoal amount. I have 2 24"x12"x12" tanks I plan on keeping them in,each planted with black sand, some caves, and both tanks have a nerite, 2 mystery snails, 15 Neocaridina denticulata, and a female betta.
 
aussieJJDude
  • #2
Having had them in the past, I can offer a few ideas.

Minimum tank size will differ for everyone, so I'm not so surprised that your getting conflicting answers! For me personally, I would keep them no less than a 10 gallon tank, and ideally in a 20 gallon long. However gallonage isn't as important as surface area, smaller (like under 10g) that's long, wide and shallow would be much prefered over a larger tank volume that has a smaller surface area.... but in your tank, you should be fine.

As for shoal size, the more the merrier. Keeping 5 or so, you will see their basic behaviours. But like also social fish, the more you have, the more interesting behaviours you will see and that 'wow' factor of having a large shoal of one fish. So yeah you could keep 5, but its a lot more exciting for you to keep 10 or more. They small fish, so having 10 isn't going to impact your bioload much....
 
Abby565
  • #3
You cannot keep pygmy Corys with a betta. They are not temp compatible.
 
Verne
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
You cannot keep pygmy Corys with a betta. They are not temp compatible.
according to seriously fish, they are? both are good at about 78-79 degrees.

Having had them in the past, I can offer a few ideas.

Minimum tank size will differ for everyone, so I'm not so surprised that your getting conflicting answers! For me personally, I would keep them no less than a 10 gallon tank, and ideally in a 20 gallon long. However gallonage isn't as important as surface area, smaller (like under 10g) that's long, wide and shallow would be much prefered over a larger tank volume that has a smaller surface area.... but in your tank, you should be fine.

As for shoal size, the more the merrier. Keeping 5 or so, you will see their basic behaviours. But like also social fish, the more you have, the more interesting behaviours you will see and that 'wow' factor of having a large shoal of one fish. So yeah you could keep 5, but its a lot more exciting for you to keep 10 or more. They small fish, so having 10 isn't going to impact your bioload much....
I was planning on 8 per tank at first.
 
Abby565
  • #5
according to seriously fish, they are? both are good at about 78-79 degrees.
Yes, I suppose they are able to live ok at those temps, but Imo, dwarf corys should be kept at anything more then 76-77 degrees. They really do best at mid to low 70s.
 
aussieJJDude
  • #6
Yes, I suppose they are able to live ok at those temps, but Imo, dwarf corys should be kept at anything more then 76-77 degrees. They really do best at mid to low 70s.
I've kept them up to 80F without major concern, they seem to be extremely adaptive to many water conditions. (Plus many seem to reccomend keeping them with bettas on another forum I frequent, since they dull coloured and not likely to nip).
 
Verne
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
I've kept them up to 80F without major concern, they seem to be extremely adaptive to many water conditions. (Plus many seem to reccomend keeping them with bettas on another forum I frequent, since they dull coloured and not likely to nip).
yea, I've seen many people keeping them with bettas and gouramis, which is why I'm looking into them.
 
Abby565
  • #8
I've kept them up to 80F without major concern, they seem to be extremely adaptive to many water conditions. (Plus many seem to reccomend keeping them with bettas on another forum I frequent, since they dull coloured and not likely to nip).

You really don't notice problems with keeping them at a higher temp, but they do live a reduced lifespan and just aren't quite as happy. I have a friend(owner of my lfs) who is extremely knowledgeable with all things nano fish, although pygmy corys aren't really that nano, and she has kept some pygmys at 72 and some at 80. She told me a while back that the ones at 72 were acually just a little more active and swam around more in the water column, while the ones at 80 tended to sit or swim on the bottom a lot more. Both tanks have fantastic water quality and are 20 gallon longs.
 
aussieJJDude
  • #9
You really don't notice problems with keeping them at a higher temp, but they do live a reduced lifespan and just aren't quite as happy. I have a friend(owner of my lfs) who is extremely knowledgeable with all things nano fish, although pygmy corys aren't really that nano, and she has kept some pygmys at 72 and some at 80. She told me a while back that the ones at 72 were acually just a little more active and swam around more in the water column, while the ones at 80 tended to sit or swim on the bottom a lot more. Both tanks have fantastic water quality and are 20 gallon longs.
Having kept them at a variety of temperature, and not noting the same problems you have I guess we can say that we have had major differences in keeping these fish. I haven't noticed the reduced lifespan or the 'bottom sitting' that you mentioned either....
 
Abby565
  • #10
Having kept them at a variety of temperature, and not noting the same problems you have I guess we can say that we have had major differences in keeping these fish. I haven't noticed the reduced lifespan or the 'bottom sitting' that you mentioned either....

Interesting! All fish are different
 
DoubleDutch
  • #11
Having kept them at a variety of temperature, and not noting the same problems you have I guess we can say that we have had major differences in keeping these fish. I haven't noticed the reduced lifespan or the 'bottom sitting' that you mentioned either....
How old did they get then?
 
aussieJJDude
  • #12
How old did they get then?
Roughly 4-7 years, some died a eariler death due to tank related incident (think for memory there was a large blackout over summer that the filter was off for a few days, a lot of my stock died)... but definently the oldest was around 7ish. Not exactly the best feat out there, but good enough considering they were adult size FYI.
 
DoubleDutch
  • #13
And are you sure they died of old age?

I can't really speak for pygmaeus, but to be honest anyone that tells me that the lifespan of their Corys isn't affected by wrong temperature in fact can't really tell.

In good conditions (not only temp) several species can get up to 25 - 30 years easily.
Most species die a lot earlier though.

I don't tell you you're not correct, but you can't really tell it does or doesn't affect their livespan to be honest. I think too high temps do.
 
aussieJJDude
  • #14
And are you sure they died of old age?
Well, assuming that they were adult size already at time of purchase, they would have to be at least a couple of months old already.... (hence 7ish.... they were around with me for 7 years, but they may of been older).

It most likely was old age, since they were fine one day and gone the next. All other fish displayed no symptoms, water quality was fine... (I will mention that they did die over the course of a 1 1/2 years, so it wasn't a mass death... no other fish was really introduced during or a couple months before their demise.)

Edit: most people seem to have success for 5 years, and on average a lot of my fish seem to grow older than the usual lifespan in captivity. An unidentified barb I had - this was days of dial up... - lasted for around 15 years, which was my parents fish for around half of it. Many of my fish seem to make it to around 5 - 10 years, unless a freak accident occurs (which I have had over the course of the hobby. I currently have a kulhI - pair - that's pushing 11 years, and I think I have a lot more years out of them!
 
Verne
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
Well, assuming that they were adult size already at time of purchase, they would have to be at least a couple of months old already.... (hence 7ish.... they were around with me for 7 years, but they may of been older).

It most likely was old age, since they were fine one day and gone the next. All other fish displayed no symptoms, water quality was fine... (I will mention that they did die over the course of a 1 1/2 years, so it wasn't a mass death... no other fish was really introduced during or a couple months before their demise.)
From what I could find in my research, pygmy cories have an average lifespan of 5-10 years.
 

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