40 Gallon Tank Cory cats getting ill - don't know what to do.

devsi

Hello all,

I have an 180 Litre (40 Gallon) tank, which was fully cycled before adding any fish, and I have been slowly adding fish over the course of a month/5 weeks to ensure the bio load is controllable.

On Sunday just gone (05th of September), I added the last group of fish (9 Sterbai Cory Cats, to compliment my existing school of 6). I tested my water parameters before adding (0ppm Ammonia, 0ppm Nitrite, 5ppm Nitrate) as I always do, and did a water change the day before (which I do on a weekly basis).

Yesterday, I saw one of the Corys looking very pale and it was laying on it's side a lot (picture below). Unfortunately, over night, he died. This morning, I've noticed another Cory with a red spot (picture also below), and I'm not sure if this is just a graze or if it's Red Blotch disease?

Since adding all my fish, I've come to learn that I have been acclimitising my fish all wrong. My LFS told me to lay the bag on the top of the water for ~20 minutes, cut it open, swish it around in my tank water and then turn it upside down and let the fish swim out. I've come to learn this is NOT the way to acclimitise fish, and it could have actually shocked and killed the fish that died yesterday, which is very sad.

I also don't have a Quarantine Tank, as it was suggested by LFS to not buy one and just treat the whole tank. I'm still not entirely sure if this is the correct thing to do or not.

If this is Red Blotch disease (RBD), could someone recommend what to do to treat him? It has been suggested to use API Melafix, because we can't get the medications over the counter in the UK that US people cank. Is this the best thing?

Is RBD contagious? Do I need to rush out and get a Quarantine tank?

Thanks in advance!

Edit: I also did another water parameter check yesterday, and it was still 0ppm Ammonia, 0ppm Nitrite, 5ppm Nitrate.


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OxymocanthusLongstrinosus

are the fish suffering? possibly it could be the gravel. most corydoryas dont mind it but sterbai are a smaller species.
 
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devsi

They don't seem to be suffering in the slightest, no. They're all having a whale of a time, by the looks of it...
> most corydoryas dont mind it but sterbai are a smaller species.

Oh I see. So they shouldn't be with gravel?
 
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OxymocanthusLongstrinosus

They don't seem to be suffering in the slightest, no. They're all having a whale of a time, by the looks of it...
> most corydoryas dont mind it but sterbai are a smaller species.

Oh I see. So they shouldn't be with gravel?
probably just banged up by the gravel. go get like 100 lbs of pool filter sand, rinse it for a few hours, get some leaf litter and twigs, get some water lettuce. add deep sand bed, never stir it unless you are adding plants and add the leaf litter and you will have happiest corydoryas ever.
 
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devsi

probably just banged up by the gravel. go get like 100 lbs of pool filter sand, rinse it for a few hours, get some leaf litter and twigs, get some water lettuce. add deep sand bed, never stir it unless you are adding plants and add the leaf litter and you will have happiest corydoryas ever.

Ah ok! And are you suggesting to replace the gravel with the sand, or to lay the sand on top of the gravel?

Thank you for the help, by the way :)
 
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OxymocanthusLongstrinosus

Ah ok! And are you suggesting to replace the gravel with the sand, or to lay the sand on top of the gravel?

Thank you for the help, by the way :)
lay on top. include some sintered glass media between the 2 layers for some sedimentation/biofiltration possibly.
if you add at least 100 lb of sand your tank iwll last forever probably, if you get algae, add more sand.
 
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devsi

Excellent, thank you. I'm surprised 100 lb of sand isn't going to cause problems as that's a whole lot of weight!

if you get algae, add more sand.

The sand helps to stop algae?
 
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Coradee

Hi Devsi that does look like it could be red blotch & bacterial infection, meds & diseases aren’t my thing so I’ll ask DoubleDutch for his opinion.

If you want to use sand I’d suggest removing the gravel & doing it properly, if you put sand on top of the gravel it will just end up underneath it.

As for adding sand to stop algae I’ve never heard that before, you’re just covering it up & it’ll keep coming back unless you address the issue of why you’re getting algae to start with.
 
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devsi

Hi Devsi that does look like it could be red blotch & bacterial infection, meds & diseases aren’t my thing so I’ll ask @DoubleDutch for his opinion.

Thank you Coradee :) I've now seen two Corys with this red mark on, so I'm a bit concerned - I don't know if I should rush out and get another tank before my LFS closes.

If you want to use sand I’d suggest removing the gravel & doing it properly, if you put sand on top of the gravel it will just end up underneath it.

That makes sense, thanks! Is it best for the Corys if I do remove the gravel? Would I have to drain the tank (that's not really an option at the moment)?

As for adding sand to stop algae I’ve never heard that before, you’re just covering it up & it’ll keep coming back unless you address the issue of why you’re getting algae to start with.

Got it. OK. Thank you :)
 
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Ouse

It looks like septicemia. This can be cured with basic TLC; the fish’s immune response usually defeats it with proper care.

Nothing to do with the gravel, although cories much prefer sand, as do all bottom-dwellers.
 
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mattgirl

Excellent, thank you. I'm surprised 100 lb of sand isn't going to cause problems as that's a whole lot of weight!



The sand helps to stop algae?
I am sorry to be so blunt but you can't believe everything you read online.This is occasionally true right here on this forum too. Sand is not going to prevent algae growth and as Coradee pointed out, adding sand on top of sand with algae on it is just covering up algae. I will recommend you leave your gravel alone until or unless it is proven to be the cause of what you are seeing.

Proper acclimation is important. I do have to say though. We can do everything just right and can still lose new fish. We have to consider what they have gone through to get from breeder to us. Some handle it better than others. Hopefully DoubleDutch will stop by before long.
 
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Ouse

lay on top. include some sintered glass media between the 2 layers for some sedimentation/biofiltration possibly.
if you add at least 100 lb of sand your tank iwll last forever probably, if you get algae, add more sand.
Why convince the OP to make a water-changeless set up for their cories (like in the other thread), which is an untold risk? What exactly does adding more sand do? You don’t need to go this far, and some algae is fine anyway.
 
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devsi

Ouse / mattgirl - thank you for responding as well :)

It looks like septicemia. This can be cured with basic TLC; the fish’s immune response usually defeats it with proper care.

So I shouldn't add any medication? I do regular water changes (weekly) and my water parameters are constantly kept in good standing (I tested again today and it's still 0ppm Ammonia, 0ppm Nitrite and 5ppm Nitrate).

No fish were added to my tank until all of these values were acceptable (see graph below).


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I am sorry to be so blunt but you can't believe everything you read online.This is occasionally true right here on this forum too. Sand is not going to prevent algae growth and as @Coradee pointed out, adding sand on top of sand with algae on it is just covering up algae. I will recommend you leave your gravel alone until or unless it is proven to be the cause of what you are seeing.

Unfortunately, I've learnt the hard way that you can get dodgy advice from your LFS and from online. I'm pretty new to the aquarium hobby, so it's incredibly difficult to distinguish good advice from bad advice at the moment.

I'm very grateful to have people helping :)

Proper acclimation is important. I do have to say though. We can do everything just right and can still lose new fish. We have to consider what they have gone through to get from breeder to us. Some handle it better than others. Hopefully @DoubleDutch will stop by before long.

Unfortunately, this is something I didn't do right with any of my fish based on advice from my LFS. Which I've only come to learn because my fish are getting sick.

I mentioned it in my OP, but I was basically recommended to leave the bag for 20 minutes, swish it around a bit and then let them out.

Some algae is fine anyway.

As far as I understand it, algae isn't harmful to the fish in anyway; it's just that people don't find it very aesthetically pleasing? I tend to leave some algae for my otos to heat, and on my castle because it gives it a "old" look.


Thank you all again :)
 
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Ouse

Erm, why are the KH and GH both non-existent? How is the pH stable with no KH?

No medication needed, just good maintenance, which I’m sure you’re keeping up with. At the most, a mild herbal remedy such as Melafix will help somewhat. Never medicate as a preemptive measure.
 
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devsi

Erm, why are the KH and GH both non-existent? How is the pH stable with no KH?

I should have clarified when posting that graph, GH/KH and Phosphate are all non-existent because I haven't recorded them.

I'm feeling another one of those "bad advice" moments coming, but my LFS told me I didn't need to test for those (I just added them to my app, just in case I needed them in the future).

No medication needed, just good maintenance, which I’m sure you’re keeping up with. At the most, a mild herbal remedy such as Melafix will help somewhat. Never medicate as a preemptive measure.

OK - thank you. I actually spoke to my LFS, and they recommended adding "internal bacteria treatment" into the whole tank, but I then learnt that some medication can be harmful to my Betta sorority so I held off until I could get a conclusive answer on the best way forward.


P.S. I noticed you're from Beds UK as well. I don't know anybody in this hobby, apart from my US colleagues. Do you just use FishLore to talk to people, or is there also a more concentrated group for Beds people?
 
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Ouse

I should have clarified when posting that graph, GH/KH and Phosphate are all non-existent because I haven't recorded them.

I'm feeling another one of those "bad advice" moments coming, but my LFS told me I didn't need to test for those (I just added them to my app, just in case I needed them in the future).
You definitely do need to test for them.
OK - thank you. I actually spoke to my LFS, and they recommended adding "internal bacteria treatment" into the whole tank, but I then learnt that some medication can be harmful to my Betta sorority so I held off until I could get a conclusive answer on the best way forward.
Yeah, don’t listen to them. Antibiotics kill more fish than they save, and breed more med-resistant strains of ailments than they kill. Definitely not something to add directly to the main tank.

LFS’s sell and recommend anything really.
P.S. I noticed you're from Beds UK as well. I don't know anybody in this hobby, apart from my US colleagues. Do you just use FishLore to talk to people, or is there also a more concentrated group for Beds people?
Oh, hey. :D I use this forum to talk to people, teach and learn. I don’t know of any local fish clubs.

Which fish shop here is your LFS?
 
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mattgirl

When it come to acclimation it kinda depends on how we bought the fish. If we order online it is recommended we float the bag to temp acclimate and once done get them out of the bag as quickly as possible once the bag is opened.

When we buy from our local fish store it is possible the parameters of their water is very close to the water in our tank if they get their water from the same water company we get ours from. In this case temp acclimation may be all that is needed. What I do when I get new fish is run the pH test and dip my TDS meter in the bag water. It the numbers are close to the same as the tank the fish are going in I just temp acclimate. If the numbers are off I open the bag wide open and attach it inside the tank. I use my turkey baster to add and take away water.

I slowly add a turkey baster of water from the tank and then pull a turkey baster of water out of the bag. I discard the water I've pulled out. I do this every 5 minutes or so for no less than 30 minutes. Once done the water in the bag is the same as the water in the tank so I just tip the bag over and let the fish swim out. By doing it this way we have avoided having to net the fish. Little guys have already been netted no less than 3 times. Once by the breeder, once when they arrived at the store and again when we buy them. That is a lot of stress these little creatures have gone through. It is amazing any of them survive.

I have to be totally honest with you. I have been in this hobby for many years. I bought my first gh/kh test about 3 years ago. If your pH is stable in my humble opinion knowing the gh/kh numbers is not something you have to know.

Again being totally honest and this is just my personal opinion getting those tests have lead to more frustration than necessary. Once someone knows the numbers then someone is going to tell them they need to do this or that to change those numbers. I will say again, If your pH is stable you don't have to know those numbers. If we have acclimated our fish to the parameters of our water our numbers, in most cases, don't have to be specific numbers.
 
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devsi

You definitely do need to test for them.

I knew that was coming :) I'll see if I can find an API test kit equivalent for GH/KH.

Yeah, don’t listen to them. Antibiotics kill more fish than they save, and breed more med-resistant strains of ailments than they kill.

Well. TIL. Thank you!

Definitely not something to add directly to the main tank.

LFS told me to not even bother with a quarantine tank and, if needed, to treat the main tank because "all the other fish will probably have it by that point anyway".

Oh, hey. :D I use this forum to talk to people, teach and learn. I don’t know of any local fish clubs.

oki doki :) I was using Reddit, but a lot of the advice there is US specific; though, I would have been lost without a lot of the help I got from there (it prompted me to learn about the nitrogen cycle for one). But then I decided to try an actual "forum" which led me here :).

Which fish shop here is your LFS?

I normally frequent Perfect Aquatics (Henlow), but I've also been to Jaws (Bedford). How about you?

============

mattgirl - response to your comment starts here :)

When we buy from our local fish store it is possible the parameters of their water is very close to the water in our tank if they get their water from the same water company we get ours from. In this case temp acclimation may be all that is needed. What I do when I get new fish is run the pH test and dip my TDS meter in the bag water. It the numbers are close to the same as the tank the fish are going in I just temp acclimate. If the numbers are off I open the bag wide open and attach it inside the tank. I use my turkey baster to add and take away water.

That makes a lot of sense! Thank you. I've actually decided to not add anymore fish to my tank, but I will definitely bare this in mind for the future!

I slowly add a turkey baster of water from the tank and then pull a turkey baster of water out of the bag. I discard the water I've pulled out. I do this every 5 minutes or so for no less than 30 minutes. Once done the water in the bag is the same as the water in the tank so I just tip the bag over and let the fish swim out. By doing it this way we have avoided having to net the fish. Little guys have already been netted no less than 3 times. Once buy the breeder, once when they arrived at the store and again when we buy them. That is a lot of stress these little creatures have gone through. It is amazing any of them survive.

That is really helpful, thank you for sharing!

I have to be totally honest with you. I have been in this hobby for many years. I bought my first gh/kh test about 3 years ago. If your pH is stable in my humble opinion knowing the gh/kh numbers is not something you have to know.
Again being totally honest and this is just my personal opinion getting those tests have lead to more frustration than necessary. Once someone knows the numbers then someone is going to tell them they need to do this or that to change those numbers. I will say again, If your pH is stable you don't have to know those numbers. If we have acclimated our fish to the parameters of our water our numbers, in most cases, don't have to be specific numbers.

Could I just double check what you mean by "if your pH is stable" please? Mine has been consistently 7.6 ever since I got the tank; do you mean stable, as in consistent through time or stable as in a magic number I should be aiming to get that to?


Thank you again :)


mattgirl - my last reply was merged into the previous one, sorry about that - it might make it slightly weird to work out I was replying to you as well
:) nevermind, it did it again - I've updated the post with a, hopefully, helpful indication.
 
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Ouse

I knew that was coming :) I'll see if I can find an API test kit equivalent for GH/KH.
For that: API Master Test Kit. It tests for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pH, KH and GH.
LFS told me to not even bother with a quarantine tank and, if needed, to treat the main tank because "all the other fish will probably have it by that point anyway".
It’s possible to get away with no QT, however you must be vigilant and avoid buying ill fish.

You must be very careful medicating the main tank, because if you overdose, you can easily kill fish, and if you underdose, the ailment can become immune to the medication. Then there’s removing the medication afterwards.

Take everything fish shops advise with a pinch of salt.
oki doki :) I was using Reddit, but a lot of the advice there is US specific; though, I would have been lost without a lot of the help I got from there (it prompted me to learn about the nitrogen cycle for one). But then I decided to try an actual "forum" which led me here :).
Most medications must be prescribed by a veterinarian in Europe, meaning they’re close to impossible to get. At the most, mild herbal remedies are sold in fish shops in terms of meds. This can prove harsh at times, so prevention is key.

In the US, all sorts of medications are available in any aquatics shop. Because of this, the hobby in the US is more used to using medications as an easy solution to things, although this can be a risk.
I normally frequent Perfect Aquatics (Henlow), but I've also been to Jaws (Bedford). How about you?
I frequent Perfect Aquatics too, but I’ve noticed their recent imports of rainbowfish have been... iffy, to say the very least. Many of their knowledgeable staff that I got to know have disappeared over time.

I haven’t heard of Jaws.

But that’s all I can really say without derailing the topic of this thread. When you reach 50 posts here, you can privately message users, so I could continue this discussion there and then if you wish. ;)
 
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mattgirl

Could I just double check what you mean by "if your pH is stable" please? Mine has been consistently 7.6 ever since I got the tank; do you mean stable, as in consistent through time or stable as in a magic number I should be aiming to get that to?
I am sorry I wasn't as clear as I should have been. Yes, as long as your pH isn't dropping or in some cases even rising then you have a stable pH level. Since yours has been a consistent 7.6 you have a stable pH.
 
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devsi

For that: API Master Test Kit. It tests for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pH, KH and GH.

I have the API Master Test Kit, and it definitely doesn't test for KH and GH... only Ammonia, Nitrite, Nitrate and pH/high pH.

It’s possible to get away with no QT, however you must be vigilant and avoid buying ill fish.

You must be very careful medicating the main tank, because if you overdose, you can easily kill fish, and if you underdose, the ailment can become immune to the medication. Then there’s removing the medication afterwards.

I'll be extra careful in future; I didn't medicate this time, thankfully; it's just so hard to know who's advice to follow sometimes - had you and mattgirl not come along, I'd have been looking to add sand to my tank....

Take everything fish shops advise with a pinch of salt.

I'm quickly coming to that realisation!

Most medications must be prescribed by a veterinarian in Europe, meaning they’re close to impossible to get. At the most, mild herbal remedies are sold in fish shops in terms of meds. This can prove harsh at times, so prevention is key.

In the US, all sorts of medications are available in any aquatics shop. Because of this, the hobby in the US is more used to using medications as an easy solution to things, although this can be a risk.

Oh, I see! That makes sense as to why there are so many recommendations for things we can't get over here.

I frequent Perfect Aquatics too, but I’ve noticed their recent imports of rainbowfish have been... iffy, to say the very least. Many of their knowledgeable staff that I got to know have disappeared over time.

It's funny you say that.... I just picked up 6 wapoga rainbowfish (28th August) from there. Should I be concerned?


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But that’s all I can really say without derailing the topic of this thread. When you reach 50 posts here, you can privately message users, so I could continue this discussion there and then if you wish. ;)

That would be awesome, if you don't mind :) even if it's just for general fishy chit-chat :) I don't have many/any people to talk to about it unfortunately haha.


I am sorry I wasn't as clear as I should have been. Yes, as long as your pH isn't dropping or in some cases even rising then you have a stable pH level. Since yours has been a consistent 7.6 you have a stable pH.

Not something you need to apologise for mattgirl - it was clear, I just wanted to clarify :)



Thank you both for your help. I'm very grateful.
 
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Ouse

Sand would be much better for the cories though.

The rainbows I saw were huge boesemanis, who had torn fins and ich. Then there were more of them. The display tanks are all connected to one big system, so the disease could possibly travel between tanks. Unless you see symptoms of diseases, yours might be fine.

Glad I could help. :)
 
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devsi

Sand would be much better for the cories though.

It would be pretty disruptive to the fish to remove all the gravel and replace with sand, though, right?

I assume I'd have to drain all of the water?

The rainbows I saw were huge boesemanis, who had torn fins and ich. Then there were more of them. The display tanks are all connected to one big system, so the disease could possibly travel between tanks. Unless you see symptoms of diseases, they might be fine.

Ah ok. I was actually looking to get the bosemanis originally, but decided they were too big for my tank and wouldn't be as happy.

I haven't seen any signs of illness in any of the other fish (apart from Corys), so hopefully they'll be fine.

Do you still go to Perfect Aquatics, or do you go somewhere else now?
 
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Ouse

Removing substrate is longing and stressful, so you might not get up to doing it anyway.

I still go, but I haven’t bought fish from there in a while due to the situation. I’m waiting for things to improve before I buy their stock again, because I know it to be one of the better LFS’s out there.
 
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devsi

Removing substrate is longing and stressful, so you might not get up to doing it anyway.

Unless there's a real need, like the Corys being actively UNhappy, I'd rather avoid it then. If it's going to give them cause to be distressed, I'd certainly be open to it; but it's not something I want to do just because.

I still go, but I haven’t bought fish from there in a while due to the situation. I’m waiting for things to improve before I buy their stock again, because I know it to be one of the better LFS’s out there.

That makes sense. Yeah, between them and Jaws, you definitely get a feel for it being a "proper" shop. Unfortunately, I've got some bad advice, but that's dependant on the individual and not the shop :)
 
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Cinabar

Hi welcome to fishlore! Looks you’re getting a lot of conflicting information. Try not to get too frustrated, that’s simply the nature of this hobby- things are always changing as people learn. You just have to make informed decisions based on what you know. And always (always!) get a second opinion, especially if your advice comes from a random pet store employee. Glad to see you haven’t been scared off yet haha
 
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mattgirl

I have always had corys. In my humble opinion no tank is complete if it doesn't have a few of these wonderful creatures in it. I call them my little vacuum cleaners. With as many as I have, no food that hits the bottom goes to waste. Of course they get food specifically for them along with all the leftovers they can find. BTW: I have at least 25 of them in my 55 gallon tank. Started with 6. My little bronze/albino corys are prolific little creatures. I guess I am going to have to start saying at least 26 since another baby came out of hiding just last month. They move too fast to get a more accurate head count.

Right now I have sand in my tanks. Up until about 3 years ago I had smooth gravel. My little vacuum cleaners never experienced any barbel loss until shortly after I switched over to pool filter sand. Fortunately the barbels have grown back but it seems the sand had sharp edges. Now that is has been in there for a few years bio-film has grown on it and has helped smooth the rough edges.

All this to say. If you like your gravel. Leave it in there. Should you decide at some point to change it out for sand make sure your tank is well established before you do it. You will be removing a significant amount of bacteria when if you remove the gravel. I would give a newly cycled tank no less than 6 months to get firmly established before making major changes. .
 
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devsi

Thanks Cinabar ! Yeah, unfortunately, lots of conflicting information!

I’m starting to learn, but it’s definitely not easy :) you’d think a LFS would be the best person to listen to (as a new person to the hobby); which is a bit of a kicker when you learn otherwise.

haha nah, I love the fish too much for that!

thanks for replying :)
 
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Debbie1986

I have emerald cories - around 20, 7 false Julii cories

all with gravel - no injuries in the 2+ years I've kept them.

Good luck!

I do have a half sand /half gravel tank for my blue lobster. they use sand with grooming - it's weird, he liked dropped it over himself with a claw 1x that I saw. I rarely see him do anything with sand.

I just have to push the sand back on 1 side if any gets into my waste bucket vacuuming.
 
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devsi

I have always had corys. In my humble opinion no tank is complete if it doesn't have a few of these wonderful creatures in it. I call them my little vacuum cleaners.

They are so fun to watch, especially when they school together!
I guess I am going to have to start saying at least 26 since another baby came out of hiding just last month. They move too fast to get a more accurate head count.

Did you breed them purposefully or in a community tank? I’d love little baby Corys!

All this to say. If you like your gravel. Leave it in there. Should you decide at some point to change it out for sand make sure your tank is well established before you do it. You will be removing a significant amount of bacteria when if you remove the gravel. I would give a newly cycled tank no less than 6 months to get firmly established before making major changes.

I do much prefer gravel for my tank (I actually just made another post about a Bristlenose Pleco, which has a full tank shot, if anybody is interested in seeing the whole thing :) ) so I think I’ll keep it as is. Thanks for all your replies mattgirl !
I have emerald cories - around 20, 7 false Julii cories

all with gravel - no injuries in the 2+ years I've kept them.

Awesome, thanks Debbie1986 !
 
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mattgirl

Did you breed them purposefully or in a community tank? I’d love little baby Corys!
You are so very welcome :)

Some of them I pulled some eggs and hatched them. Others have hatched in the tank. I love it when I spy a baby in the tank. I am alway amazed they have survived from egg to big enough to come out and join the crowd each time I see one. I run sponge filters in my tank along with HOB filters. It seems the babies find all the food they need on the sponge filters. Normally behind one of them is where I first see tiny corys.
 
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devsi

Aww well I’ll be keeping my eyes out for baby Corys in the coming months then!

I just use the filter that’s built in my Juwel Rio 180 LED. Is there any reason I’d want to turn that off and use a sponge filter instead?
 
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mattgirl

Aww well I’ll be keeping my eyes out for baby Corys in the coming months then!

I just use the filter that’s built in my Juwel Rio 180 LED. Is there any reason I’d want to turn that off and use a sponge filter instead?
No, you don't want to turn off your main filter. I run sponge filters in addition to my main filters. You can never have too much filtration. Too much water movement is possible if it is affecting your fishes ability to swim but never too much filtration.

I seldom use the words ever or never but when it comes to filtration I am comfortable using never too much.
 
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devsi

Ah ok! Thank you!

from what I know of sponge filters (which isn’t much), you use them with a air pump; so I’d just replace my airstone(s) with a sponge filter, is that right?
 
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DoubleDutch

Hi Devsi that does look like it could be red blotch & bacterial infection, meds & diseases aren’t my thing so I’ll ask DoubleDutch for his opinion.

If you want to use sand I’d suggest removing the gravel & doing it properly, if you put sand on top of the gravel it will just end up underneath it.

As for adding sand to stop algae I’ve never heard that before, you’re just covering it up & it’ll keep coming back unless you address the issue of why you’re getting algae to start with.
I am not sure. First thing jumping in mind is "they are rather thin". Could be the problem was allready "in the fish" when you bought them. A bad diet or worms maybe. Deworming is a good idea.
Second thing indeed is the gravel. Though smooth Corys seem to have issues on this size gravel (my suspecion is pollution by food / bacterial growth.

Melafix can definitely be used in case of adaption-issues (and Red Blotch), so I'd use that and try to save the others.
 
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mattgirl

Ah ok! Thank you!

from what I know of sponge filters (which isn’t much), you use them with a air pump; so I’d just replace my airstone(s) with a sponge filter, is that right?
Right. Since you are already running an airstone you are half way there. Just replace the airstone with a sponge filter. A sponge filter serves a double purpose. Like an airstone they oxygenate the water but are also a great place to bacteria to grow. One more plus to sponge filters. Once one is well seeded with bacteria it can be used to jump start or in some cases instantly cycle another tank.
 
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devsi

Melafix can definitely be used in case of adaption-issues (and Red Blotch), so I'd use that and try to save the others.

Sorry, I’m confused now. I thought the recommendation was not to medicate, especially not medicate the main tank? Isn’t this saying the opposite?

Just replace the airstone with a sponge filter. A sponge filter serves a double purpose. Like an airstone they oxygenate the water but are also a great place to bacteria to grow. One more plus to sponge filters. Once one is well seeded with bacteria it can be used to jump start or in some cases instantly cycle another tank.

Excellent, thanks again mattgirl ! I’ll look into replacing one of, if not both, of my air stones with sponge filters :)


mattgirl Cinabar Ouse DoubleDutch (sorry for tagging, I’m just very confused) - should I be going to buy some Melafix? Should I be treating the main tank or should I be buying a QT as a matter of urgency?

I thought I’d understood the advice to leave and not medicate, ensuring good water quality, and it should clear up over time.
 
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mattgirl

Good job on switching over to sponge filter(s) in place of air stones.

As far as the use of the medication DoubleDutch recommended. Since both Coradee and I called out to him for his expertise in medicating corys I do have to bow to his wisdom. If he thinks Melafix needs to be used I have to think it is a safe product. From what I have read about this product it is a very weak solution so shouldn't be a problem using it.

I might hold off for a while longer to see if clean water and a good diet is all that is needed though. How are all your little guys and girls doing this morning? are you seeing any more problems?
 
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devsi

Good job on switching over to sponge filter(s) in place of air stones.

Just looking for a good sponge filter to get and I'll be making the switch :) thanks for the help!

As far as the use of the medication @DoubleDutch recommended. Since both @Coradee and I called out to him for his expertise in medicating corys I do have to bow to his wisdom. If he thinks Melafix needs to be used I have to think it is a safe product. From what I have read about this product it is a very weak solution so shouldn't be a problem using it.

And I should use it in my main tank? Or should I be going to buy a QT ASAP, cycling it and transferring the corys to it and then medicating?

Just in case - DoubleDutch - I am in no way disagreeing with your recommendation, I am just confused and didn't know what course of action to take.

I might hold off for a while longer to see if clean water and a good diet is all that is needed though. How are all your little guys and girls doing this morning? are you seeing any more problems?

They all seem pretty happy, to be honest. The redness seems to be going down (or I'm just hoping it is).

I saw one of my otto's with a dodgy mark where it's eye is, but that may have been a Betta pecking it (as one did while I was trying to get a picture of it).

However, I did just notice this little guy (or girl) and it seems to have a bit of green discolouration? Is that something wrong or just a natural colouring?


1631109487536.png

Here's the oto - managed to get a good picture of him.


1631111102224.png
 
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mattgirl

Quite often when we first get fish we see each tiny difference and get concerned. Sometimes it is something to be concerned about but lots of times it isn't. I've never seen any kind of disease showing up as green on a fish.

My main concern would be the Betta pecking on any of the fish. Something like that can cause stress to the fish that are being picked on. Stress can lower immunity. In the wild fish can get away from aggressive fish. Unfortunately they don't have that option in our tanks.

Bettas have been known to not be the best option for a community tank. Keep a very close eye on her and if she continues to peck at any of the other fish she may need a tank of her own. Female bettas can be just as aggressive as male bettas. Out of nowhere she could go on a killing spree should she decide she doesn't want any other fish in the tank with her. She can cause a lot of damage very quickly should she decide she doesn't want any other fish in there with her.

I will let doubledutch answer the question about the QT and medication. I don't really think you need to rush out and buy a QT right now though. You may want to read up on melafix while waiting for him to log on. I suspect there are tons of threads here on the forum about it.
 
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