Cory Cat Schooling

TrainerRuby

Do different Cory cat types not intermingle? I had an albino Cory and I went and got five more to make a small school. They didn't have any other albinos so I told them whatever Cory's are fine and came back with four pandas and a bronze but they all seem to stay separate for the most part the albino hangs around the right the bronze in the left and the pandas all hang out in the middle
 

jacob thompson

Sometimes closely related cory catfish species will mix their schools but most of the time they will not.
 

Deku-Cory

No, different species don't school together. Albino Cories are almost always albino Bronze Cories, so they school together. Some types such as Bronze and Pandas aren't known to be tight schoolers, but they still do best in groups. I have a large group of Bronze Cories, and they don't really school, but they are much more confident and active than when I had only a few. They are so much fun to watch in groups! You'll want at least 5 of each to make a good school. (5 Pandas, 5 Bronze/Albino)
 

oldsalt777

Do different Cory cat types not intermingle? I had an albino Cory and I went and got five more to make a small school. They didn't have any other albinos so I told them whatever Cory's are fine and came back with four pandas and a bronze but they all seem to stay separate for the most part the albino hangs around the right the bronze in the left and the pandas all hang out in the middle

Hello Train...

Corydoras aren't schooling fish, they're shoaling fish. There's a considerable difference. Different Corys will forage together sometimes, but will go off on their own once they become used to their tank. Watch Tetras, those are true schooling fish.

Old
 

bizaliz3

They will often hang with other cory species if they are not given any other option. (in your case, not so much it appears) But there is most definitely a noticeable difference when they are kept in groups of their own kind.
Yes, they are shoaling, rather than schooling. But its the same concept. They are much more comfortable in groups...most specifically groups of their kind. They are more active, more social and much more fun to watch! So it is rewarding for the fish AND the fish keeper to have them kept in groups of one type.
I have done it both ways. Early on in my fish keeping career, I mixed species to give myself more variety. They did hang out together. But...that was about it. When I put my first group of all one kind...it was majorly different. They followed each other everywhere and were more active...it was just so nice to see.
 

Lynn78too

Yes, they are shoaling, rather than schooling. But its the same concept. They are much more comfortable in groups...most specifically groups of their kind
Shoaling is not the same as schooling.
I've always explained shoaling as kids running around on the playground together. It's kind of chaotic but they're all together and except an occasional stray one, none of them are going off to hang out on their own.
Schooling is similar to Canada geese. They move as one unit, they turn left and right as if their brains are all wired together. Some species school better than others, if you've ever seen videos of sardines they are the ultimate schoolers. Tetras are good schoolers as well however don't assume that because you get a dozen tetras that they'll school well.

Do different Cory cat types not intermingle? I had an albino Cory and I went and got five more to make a small school. They didn't have any other albinos so I told them whatever Cory's are fine and came back with four pandas and a bronze but they all seem to stay separate for the most part the albino hangs around the right the bronze in the left and the pandas all hang out in the middle
You're asking a coyote and a wolf to hang out together. They're not the same and though in desperation they might interbreed (not sure if Corys do or don't) they would prefer to be with their own kind.

That said, you already have them, you can either return a couple of them or get more. This time be specific though.
 

bizaliz3

Shoaling is not the same as schooling.
I've always explained shoaling as kids running around on the playground together. It's kind of chaotic but they're all together and except an occasional stray one, none of them are going off to hang out on their own.
Schooling is similar to Canada geese. They move as one unit, they turn left and right as if their brains are all wired together. Some species school better than others, if you've ever seen videos of sardines they are the ultimate schoolers. Tetras are good schoolers as well however don't assume that because you get a dozen tetras that they'll school well.


You're asking a coyote and a wolf to hang out together. They're not the same and though in desperation they might interbreed (not sure if Corys do or don't) they would prefer to be with their own kind.

That said, you already have them, you can either return a couple of them or get more. This time be specific though.

I know it's not the same.
I said "same concept"
 

DoubleDutch

I know it's not the same.
I said "same concept"
And a lot if corys often don't school or shoal like other fish anyway hahaha. They "group" or let's call it they "Cory".

My Peppereds often operate in groups of 2 - 3 individuals.
 

bizaliz3

And a lot if corys often don't school or shoal like other fish anyway hahaha. They "group" or let's call it they "Cory".

My Peppereds often operate in groups of 2 - 3 individuals.

Haha. Well...there is no denying that they like the company of other like themselves. Grouping...cory-ing....whatever it may be!

Is it possible your cories that are hanging out in duos and trios still feel comfort knowing that there are more of them in there? Or do you think the 2 or 3 would be equally happy if it were just them? I am genuinely curious.
 

DoubleDutch

Haha. Well...there is no denying that they like the company of other like themselves. Grouping...cory-ing....whatever it may be!

Is it possible your cories that are hanging out in duos and trios still feel comfort knowing that there are more of them in there? Or do you think the 2 or 3 would be equally happy if it were just them? I am genuinely curious.
Ohhh I think you're compeltely right about that part that they are more comfortable with as many of their own species around.
My venezuelans (about 25) are often in small groups but socialize, play and interact in changing groups.
Corys simply are social fish and act completely different in a bigger group than in a smaller one (as you stated earlier).
I've more than once adopted loners (Peppered) and you don't know what you see when they arrive in a decent group (really moving to watch them meeting).

Lonely Corys / small groups thriving is a contradictio in terminis. It is said by people that never seriously watched the behaviour of the same Corys in a decent group.
 

Redshark1

Maybe the word for a group of Corydoras is "corral" which they certainly are in an aquarium.

Interesting to watch several hundred in an LFS all pointing and swimming in the same direction as one. Also seen this on youtube video of wild Corydoras. This makes sense rather than individuals doing their own thing and colliding continually.
 

jjohnwm

Different terms for different behaviours. A group of Corydoras is a "parade-ground", where as tetras assemble into "class-rooms", "raves" or "bus-loads" depending upon the exact species. Live-bearers, of course, group themselves in "orgies". Most gouramis group into either "square-dances" or "bar-fights" and barbs are always in "street-gangs" or "teams".

Realistically though, all the various natural groupings disappear most of the time in most aquariums. If you were observing a large group of Corydoras or tetras in nature, you might debate if it was a school or a shoal...but when you consider that the typical home aquarium would probably fit a dozen or a hundred times into the area covered by the group of fish, you realize that when they are confined together into a tank they are already closer together than they necessarily would be in a natural setting. It's like herding a bunch of kids into a school bus and then telling them to split into teams and play baseball in there. Just not enough room to behave in a natural fashion.
 

Redshark1

Its a paradox.

Schooling and shoaling are different.

But as a concept they are the same.

What are they as an abstract concept?
 

jjohnwm

It's a paradox, wrapped in an enigma, topped with a puzzle, dipped in quandary sauce and with a side order of "...huh???"

Wait...what was the question again?
 

86 ssinit

Different terms for different behaviours. A group of Corydoras is a "parade-ground", where as tetras assemble into "class-rooms", "raves" or "bus-loads" depending upon the exact species. Live-bearers, of course, group themselves in "orgies". Most gouramis group into either "square-dances" or "bar-fights" and barbs are always in "street-gangs" or "teams".

Realistically though, all the various natural groupings disappear most of the time in most aquariums. If you were observing a large group of Corydoras or tetras in nature, you might debate if it was a school or a shoal...but when you consider that the typical home aquarium would probably fit a dozen or a hundred times into the area covered by the group of fish, you realize that when they are confined together into a tank they are already closer together than they necessarily would be in a natural setting. It's like herding a bunch of kids into a school bus and then telling them to split into teams and play baseball in there. Just not enough room to behave in a natural fashion.

It's a paradox, wrapped in an enigma, topped with a puzzle, dipped in quandary sauce and with a side order of "...huh???"

Wait...what was the question again?

Great answers!!! No there not wild anymore. Many many generation removed from wild. There now aquarium fish. Who knows what they’ll do?
 

Isobelle

My pandas don’t even like to school with each other haha. They stay separate unless they’re eating (they’re fed in a dish) or they’re scared. They’re attached at the fins during water changes because hey don’t like the siphon, but other than that usually a couple hang out together and the rest are separately exploring.
 

ystrout

My pandas don’t even like to school with each other haha. They stay separate unless they’re eating (they’re fed in a dish) or they’re scared. They’re attached at the fins during water changes because hey don’t like the siphon, but other than that usually a couple hang out together and the rest are separately exploring.
My pandas normally don't either. They normally are exploring or eating by themselves nowhere near each other. But every once in a while, they'll cuddle or play leapfrog and literally sit on top of each other.

It's also funny yours hate the siphon. All of my fish EXCEPT my pandas hate it. The pandas will actually swim up to me during the water change and I have to be careful not to suck them up the siphon haha.
 

Lynn78too

Different terms for different behaviours. A group of Corydoras is a "parade-ground", where as tetras assemble into "class-rooms", "raves" or "bus-loads" depending upon the exact species. Live-bearers, of course, group themselves in "orgies". Most gouramis group into either "square-dances" or "bar-fights" and barbs are always in "street-gangs" or "teams".

Realistically though, all the various natural groupings disappear most of the time in most aquariums. If you were observing a large group of Corydoras or tetras in nature, you might debate if it was a school or a shoal...but when you consider that the typical home aquarium would probably fit a dozen or a hundred times into the area covered by the group of fish, you realize that when they are confined together into a tank they are already closer together than they necessarily would be in a natural setting. It's like herding a bunch of kids into a school bus and then telling them to split into teams and play baseball in there. Just not enough room to behave in a natural fashion.
They kind of remind me of cattle standing in a field. They're not clumped together but they all face the same direction. Is it coincidence and they just all like the sun on their butts?
 

bizaliz3

My pandas don’t even like to school with each other haha. They stay separate unless they’re eating (they’re fed in a dish) or they’re scared. They’re attached at the fins during water changes because hey don’t like the siphon, but other than that usually a couple hang out together and the rest are separately exploring.

Imagine how much scarier those scary moments would be if the didnt have each other!!

The fact that they aren't together means they are stress free yay!!
 

86 ssinit

One or a dozen Cory’s in a tank they are allways fun to watch. For some reason I allways think of them as super Mario with a broom cleaning the tank. .
 

Isobelle

I love them! I wanted some with my last betta but he was a real jerk and I only had a 10 gallon. As soon as I had a bigger tank I knew all I wanted were some panda cories! They’re very clumsy though and keep getting their food stuck places so they have to eat in a terracotta dish till they’re older. I think I may try a small pot though as the tetras with them are little food thieves.
 

AquaticJ

Some Cories Corying
 

uncle fishy

I have two green corys and three albino corys in a community tank with a bunch of different mid swimmers and they certainly rest under the same ornament and at least "hang out" together most of the time. I've seen them all spawn in a pack on several occasions too. No tank should be without some of these wonderful, interesting, gentle and beneficial fish.
 

DoubleDutch

Some Cories Corying
Anxious to know what they're watching hahaha. They look amazed (and amazing).

Think you've the most beautiful ones AJ
 

AquaticJ

This is actually their album cover!
 

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