Correct placement of filters intake/output?

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Crow

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Hi
Newbie here. I have two external cannisters to set up my 200 gal tank. Where is the best place to put intakes and outputs?
I thought I woud have intakes at each end with the left one outputting accross surface from middle of tank directed to right and vice versa for other. This I think would give enough surface agitation and flow direction of tank water would be from centre to ends. Is this a good idea or am I way off track?
I would really appreciate thoughts.
Thankyou
Richard
 

Isabella

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If I personally had 2 canister filters, I would probably do something like this:
(this is just a suggestion)
 
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Crow

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hi
Thanks Isabella. I hadn't thought of it that way but I can see a lot of sense in it. I would ask though, would I be better to have one intake lower near bottom? In your diagram the intake on right could be placed lower to take in lower debris. It would still create your circular waterflow. How would this affect?. Sorry to ask question about it but new and curious to all reasonings.
Thanks
Richard
 

Isabella

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Richard, this picture shows the tank's TOP view. It's like you're looking down into your tank. It's not an eye-level view.

The circular water flow is mainly created by the outflow tubes and the directions in which they're pointed at. You basically want your 2 outflow tubes (1 from each canister filter) to let the water flow in the same direction. The direction is counter-clockwise in this picture (once again, it's a top view).

The intake tubes should neither be placed too low nor too high. If you'll have sand, you might want your intake tubes in the middle, so that the sand doesn't get into the filter. If you'll have gravel, you can have the intake tubes around 2" above the gravel. I understand you want the filter to suck out the debris. But most of the time, the filter alone won't do this job. To clean your gravel well, it's best to vacuum it with a special gravel vac (during water changes). The gravel vac (or siphon tube) is available at fish stores and it's cheap.

EXCEPTION: If your tank will be fully planted, then you should not poke the gravel with the siphon tube as it will damage plants' root systems. In planted tanks you usually hover the siphon tube above the gravel during your water changes. It's also recommended to gently stir/poke the gravel in a planted tank with some thin stick, from time to time, so that there are no dangerous gas pockets trapped under the gravel. This gas is poisonous to fish.
 
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Hi
Thanks again Isabella. Got the picture now. I know we newbies don't seem real bright but never gonna be any different if questions are not asked. I am looking to learn not just listen. I will take your advice and set things up as suggested.
Thanks again
Richard
 

Isabella

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You're welcome Richard I had been a newbie too, and even now, I am still learning. You always learn something new, no matter what area you're studying . So, of course, ask as many questions as you need. That is why this forum exists. Most of what I know about tanks and fish, I have learned from Fish Lore and its wonderful moderators as well as many wonderful members
 
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