Correct or best placement for heater?

where/how do you keep heater?

  • vertically

    Votes: 42 32.6%
  • horizontally

    Votes: 29 22.5%
  • back of tank

    Votes: 42 32.6%
  • other

    Votes: 16 12.4%

  • Total voters
    129

takadi

Valued Member
Messages
101
Reaction score
1
Points
103
Experience
Just started
I voted vertical because the one heater I kept horizontally failed two months later
 
  • Moderator

Mike

Fishlore
Messages
6,796
Reaction score
1,804
Points
633
Experience
More than 10 years
Resurrecting this poll
 

Señor Pescado

Valued Member
Messages
175
Reaction score
145
Points
88
Experience
3 years
I keep mine vertically on the back wall of the tank, a half inch off the substrate, and almost touching my HOB filter intake tube. It ends up being slightly off-center from the middle of the tank, left-to-right. When I had fake plants, I noticed that there was good circulation flow in this area of the tank.
 

MissPanda

Well Known Member
Messages
511
Reaction score
688
Points
138
Mines on the left beneath my filter and the thermometer reader is on the right of the tank. It is vertically placed.
 

Sorg67

Well Known Member
Messages
1,055
Reaction score
683
Points
123
Experience
Just started
I like mine horizontally near the bottom so that I do not have to turn it off for water changes and since heat rises it seems reasonable to have it at the bottom. Of course that only works for fully submersible heaters that allow horizontal orientations. Important to read the instructions of each individual heater to make sure you follow the appropriate guidelines.
 

lilirose

Well Known Member
Messages
750
Reaction score
636
Points
103
Experience
More than 10 years
In my big tank (which is a 90 liter/23 gallon, but 90cm/35 inches long so a bit longer than a US 20 long) I have one small heater on each end and one in the middle of the back. It works very well, the small heaters are far less obtrusive than a single big one at the back (which is what I started out with) and the temperature is stable throughout the tank.
 

mattgirl

Fishlore Legend
Messages
10,130
Reaction score
9,071
Points
758
Experience
More than 10 years
Poll should have been multiple choice. Mine is vertical and on the back of my tank. I have it situated between the 2 HOB filters. It is designed to be fully submersible but I'm not at all comfortable submersing it. By not doing so I can adjust the temp if needed without having to reach into the water to do it.
 

jinjerJOSH22

Well Known Member
Messages
1,709
Reaction score
1,609
Points
173
Experience
1 year
Mine are usually horizontal at the back but it really depends, mostly because I always forget to account for it when I'm scaping then have to shove it in anywhichway :D
 

CaptainAquatics

Well Known Member
Messages
2,006
Reaction score
1,143
Points
208
Experience
3 years
I like to have mine in my filters if they fit
 

Momgoose56

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,964
Reaction score
3,790
Points
458
Experience
More than 10 years
psalm18.2 said:
Where in the aquarium should the heater be? I have a 20 gallon long w/ heater in back horizontally in middle. Another on side under 2nd filter. Where and how do you keep yours?
My 'rules': Not right under filter intake. Vertical if fish rest on horizontal surfaces, if horizontal, placed near bottom of the tank (heat rises) .
 

angelcraze

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,252
Reaction score
3,543
Points
498
Experience
More than 10 years
I have them vertical and not fully submerged. My heaters are old and I don't trust that they are fully sealed anymore. Probably safe, just my own worry. I'd be nervous about a fish getting burned if I had them horizontal as well, I could see a pleco sitting on it, but again, I might just be paranoid. It would be nice to hide them and not worry about unplugging/ plugging back in during water changes.

Momgoose56 said:
My 'rules': Not right under filter intake. Vertical if fish rest on horizontal surfaces, if horizontal, placed near bottom of the tank (heat rises) .
Why not just under filter intake? Just curious. Because you don't want heated water going though the filter?
 

John58ford

Valued Member
Messages
457
Reaction score
411
Points
73
Experience
3 years
In the sump of course.

I suppose in my other tanks, wherever they fit. I always pay close attention to manufacturer instructions as far as vertical vs horizontal. I like my vertical ones close to the filter intake on the side opposite of the outlet. If it's a horizontal install I put it where it gets some flow but is out of sight.

My only real personal rule (besides read the instructions) is far enough from an airstone or eductor that it doesn't get any extra bubbles sticking to it.
 

Dennis57

Well Known Member
Messages
592
Reaction score
451
Points
83
Experience
More than 10 years
I have my heater horizontal about an 1" off of my rocks. I use the titanium heater with a controller.
 

Momgoose56

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,964
Reaction score
3,790
Points
458
Experience
More than 10 years
angelcraze said:
I have them vertical and not fully submerged. My heaters are old and I don't trust that they are fully sealed anymore. Probably safe, just my own worry. I'd be nervous about a fish getting burned if I had them horizontal as well, I could see a pleco sitting on it, but again, I might just be paranoid. It would be nice to hide them and not worry about unplugging/ plugging back in during water changes.


Why not just under filter intake? Just curious. Because you don't want heated water going though the filter?
You don't want 'super heated' water going into the filter intake certainly. I don't know how warm the water is rising from my heater so that's just my rule for heater placement. Some heater manufacturers also have cautions that state not to place heaters right next to filter intakes.
 

John58ford

Valued Member
Messages
457
Reaction score
411
Points
73
Experience
3 years
Momgoose56 said:
just my rule
It makes me smile we all have our personal rules and norms.
I totally get your logic, and have seen something similar with a tetra HT heater I have. It swings the temps as allot, like almost 3 degrees before it engages. Once it does engage it's chugging along for 8-10 minutes to catch up. In low flow, it does get very hot, like true to the no touch warning sign hot.
That's why I moved it closer to the intake though as counter intuitive as it sounds. Though it has been relagated to a sump system as a back up since this test:

I only use one HOB in my fish room at this point, it's set up on the back left slightly centered on a 10 gallon. This is my current 3 month QT. Remember the old school double bulb hoods? It has a cut out right there for the hob. In this one there are 2 clear paths of turbulent water, a fast one on the left near the outflow, and a slower one on the right, same pattern but larger. I like the heater vertical about 2 inches from the intake on right side, the end of the slowest return route, as this is likely the coolest water in the tank.

In testing of locations, using thermometers in each corner and a digital BBQ thermometer stuck right by the heater this kept things the most level. The heaters water at 1" using the tetra HT 10 gets up to about 90 degrees toward the end of hearing cycle. The corners of the tank stay at ~78 and ~76 respectively. The tetra would cycle on when water near it got down to 75. At that time the corners were still about 77 and 76, never figured that out, I credit magic and thermal mass+turbulent water friction. With the other half of the digital thermometer in the HOB, I would see 75-83 degrees through heater cycles.

With the heater in the slow corner, the fast corner and filter could drop to 72 degrees and water near the heater into the mid- high 90s.

With the heater on the fast side corner it was slightly better at the heater and filter but the slow side would get down to 72 and stay there, oh my.

Due to this, in a single filtered tank I try to stay 2-3 inches away from the intake (including the size of the pre-filter) putting the heater just about smack in the middle vertically. I also have gone to a digital heater that cycles at a closer temperature and only stays on about a minute at a time, the highs never clear 82 at one inch from the heater, and the corner and filter temps reflect that by being truly stable +/- 1.5 degrees.

I think of your heater could do it, horizontally near the bottom on the slow side would yield similar results, though I haven't tested that way as it doesn't fit well enough in my case.

In my most overworked sump system I use one cheap aqueon 150 watt heater, and one digital 150 watt heater to heat 60 gallons with a 10-20 degree cooler room temp. The heaters are after my filtration and before the pumps I find the temps in the sump to remain under 85 and the tanks are very stable at 80 in the closest tank and 77 in the longest run, right before the weir. The two heaters are within 3 inches of each other in a vertical chamber with very high flow, strangely they never cycle together, but something must be working right as they take turns and keep it at the right temp.

If 2" + 1" of pre filter is what momgoose would consider not close, I think we have a difference in thought and expression, with likely very similar results. I love these threads.

If anyone wants to try and confirm my testing, I used a thermo pro tp08, with one probe clipped into an air line suction cup, and the other in the chamber of the hob. My corner thermometers were the cheap glass ones. I would use something else as they take about 60 seconds to show a 5 degree change in my experience, but I have dozens of those and only one BBQ thermometer. I boiled it's leads before using it in tank.
 

Momgoose56

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,964
Reaction score
3,790
Points
458
Experience
More than 10 years
John58ford said:
It makes me smile we all have our personal rules and norms.
I totally get your logic, and have seen something similar with a tetra HT heater I have. It swings the temps as allot, like almost 3 degrees before it engages. Once it does engage it's chugging along for 8-10 minutes to catch up. In low flow, it does get very hot, like true to the no touch warning sign hot.
That's why I moved it closer to the intake though as counter intuitive as it sounds. Though it has been relagated to a sump system as a back up since this test:

I only use one HOB in my fish room at this point, it's set up on the back left slightly centered on a 10 gallon. This is my current 3 month QT. Remember the old school double bulb hoods? It has a cut out right there for the hob. In this one there are 2 clear paths of turbulent water, a fast one on the left near the outflow, and a slower one on the right, same pattern but larger. I like the heater vertical about 2 inches from the intake on right side, the end of the slowest return route, as this is likely the coolest water in the tank.

In testing of locations, using thermometers in each corner and a digital BBQ thermometer stuck right by the heater this kept things the most level. The heaters water at 1" using the tetra HT 10 gets up to about 90 degrees toward the end of hearing cycle. The corners of the tank stay at ~78 and ~76 respectively. The tetra would cycle on when water near it got down to 75. At that time the corners were still about 77 and 76, never figured that out, I credit magic and thermal mass+turbulent water friction. With the other half of the digital thermometer in the HOB, I would see 75-83 degrees through heater cycles.

With the heater in the slow corner, the fast corner and filter could drop to 72 degrees and water near the heater into the mid- high 90s.

With the heater on the fast side corner it was slightly better at the heater and filter but the slow side would get down to 72 and stay there, oh my.

Due to this, in a single filtered tank I try to stay 2-3 inches away from the intake (including the size of the pre-filter) putting the heater just about smack in the middle vertically. I also have gone to a digital heater that cycles at a closer temperature and only stays on about a minute at a time, the highs never clear 82 at one inch from the heater, and the corner and filter temps reflect that by being truly stable +/- 1.5 degrees.

I think of your heater could do it, horizontally near the bottom on the slow side would yield similar results, though I haven't tested that way as it doesn't fit well enough in my case.

In my most overworked sump system I use one cheap aqueon 150 watt heater, and one digital 150 watt heater to heat 60 gallons with a 10-20 degree cooler room temp. The heaters are after my filtration and before the pumps I find the temps in the sump to remain under 85 and the tanks are very stable at 80 in the closest tank and 77 in the longest run, right before the weir. The two heaters are within 3 inches of each other in a vertical chamber with very high flow, strangely they never cycle together, but something must be working right as they take turns and keep it at the right temp.

If 2" + 1" of pre filter is what momgoose would consider not close, I think we have a difference in thought and expression, with likely very similar results. I love these threads.
:) I just have one big heater in my 125 that keeps temp consistent 24/7 and hangs horizontally below the canister outflow on one end. Temp at both ends is exactly the same, temp sensors are on front/ side of tank at each end, furthest away from heater, intake, outflow and sensors are 5.5 feet apart. Works for me!
 

John58ford

Valued Member
Messages
457
Reaction score
411
Points
73
Experience
3 years
Momgoose56 said:
horizontally below the canister outflow
I like that but you using a canister is almost as much cheating as me using my sump;). Do you have yours set up in a river (intake on one side outlet on the opposite) or in a more traditional inlet low on the same side as a higher outlet? I've been wanting to make a post about this one specifically for the sump and canister guys but it's so dependent on our target breeds I'd have to have 3 different poles in one thread lol.
 

Momgoose56

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,964
Reaction score
3,790
Points
458
Experience
More than 10 years
John58ford said:
I like that but you using a canister is almost as much cheating as me using my sump;). Do you have yours set up in a river (intake on one side outlet on the opposite) or in a more traditional inlet low on the same side as a higher outlet? I've been wanting to make a post about this one specifically for the sump and canister guys but it's so dependent on our target breeds I'd have to have 3 different poles in one thread lol.
River. Low intake one end, outflow up high on the other end. One outlet on outflow angled toward surface down the length of the back, other pointed lower toward front side. Problem with these older fx5's is you can't adjust flow volume so I have to direct flow from one outlet against the front wall to keep from creating a constant 'toilet bowl swir'l in the tank (it's not really that extreme but still...) lol!
I'd love a big sump tho. I'd like to have plants AND the heater in it- can't keep plants in one piece in a cichlid tank.
How big would a sump have to be for a 125-180 overstocked tank?
Edit: well that was a dumb question, it would have to be at least as big as the canister and then some for plants, right? Maybe a 30 gallon tank?
 

John58ford

Valued Member
Messages
457
Reaction score
411
Points
73
Experience
3 years
Momgoose56 said:
How big would a sump have to be for a 125-180 overstocked tank?
Specializing in nano sumps, I've always looked at how small I can make it and gone from there the best source of numbers I could find was for fluval. I reverse engineered one of their all in one systems. Using the ratio of rings they had in one of there tanks I found about a liter of ceramics per one hundred of water. That tank has a pump with average turnover at about 6x pretty hour. In my designs I have always more than doubled it as you know from other threads on seeding and cycling etc. The smallest I could do for a 125 would fit in a 5 gallon, with about 2 gallons for filtration including mechanical (floss and sponge) and 2-3 liters of rings under them gravity fed. The next chamber would be heaters flowing up, then spill down to a pump/carbon chamber.

If I was doing one for show and wanted a planted refuge so the cichlids wouldn't tear up the plants I would wall the back of a 20 long or 40 breeder with black acrilic, use the rear half for filter/ heat chambers, then the front half for planted refuge. I would spill in the middle for mechanical, chamber to the left for bio, spill out the top left corner into the refuge, spill into the top right chamber for heaters carbon or polishing, upflow toward center for heaters, then spill into a final chamber for the pumps. I always design so my bio, and heaters cannot be pumped dry so a downward spill to the pumps is my M.O.

I have a 125 build planned for the summer and this would be my dream sump, I however want to make it the same width half the depth of the 125 and mount it overhead so I can grow surface plants like water Lilly and bamboo and grapes up a light rack :). I'm watching Craigslist for a leaky 125 or a come and get it kind of post so I can pull the silicone and cut it to size.
 

juniperlea

Well Known Member
Messages
1,103
Reaction score
764
Points
123
I just don't want to see them. So, in the summer, I keep them either vertically or horizontally, at the back. My room temp in summer is between 78 and 80 F. I basically rarely touched them. Winter is a problem. Base board electric heat. It's affecting the tanks. It really is. I don't want to look at the heaters, but, I now have to move them towards the front, so I can more easily access that annoyingly and incredibly tiny knob! Welcome to electric baseboard heat. It's feast or famile. Therefore, Front It Is, vertically or horizontally!
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom