Cories

Cories

Aqua 59

Member
Aqua 59 submitted a new resource:

Cories - A complete care guide to corydoras.

Introduction
Corydoras, also called cories or armored catfish, are a small species of freshwater catfish that are becoming increasingly popular in the aquarium hobby due to their easy-care nature, and peaceful disposition. They are known as "beginner fish", as they are very easy to care for.

Appearance
Corydoras vaguely resemble the well-known catfish, with barbs on the chin that help with sensory. They come in many different color patterns, such as peppered,...
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  • Thread Starter

Aqua 59

Member
Well, I wrote it, but looked on some different websites to see if they all agreed on basic parameters/temperature and stuff. What do you disagree about?
 

Sarah73

Member
Aqua 59 said:
Well, I wrote it, but looked on some different websites to see if they all agreed on basic parameters/temperature and stuff. What do you disagree about?
Algae wafers are one thing you should rarely feed them as cories are meat eater. They eat shrimp pellets, bloodworms, brine shrimp, etc. They will only eat vegetables if that is what you give them. Second, you don't need a mop in order for the cories to breed. They will usually lay eggs on the walls. Third, three isn't enough. I would say 5 or more minimum.
 

Goldie&Yami

Member
Not all cories are easy to breed, different breeds(pygmys can be kept in a 10 gallon), and what I see and most importantly and highly highly recommended for the health of all catfish involved. Keep them in numbers of AT LEAST 6 or more. That's what will keep them happier, healthier, and keep bullying from happening.
 

Sarah73

Member
Goldie&Yami said:
Not all cories are easy to breed, different breeds(pygmys can be kept in a 10 gallon) and what I see and most importantly and highly highly recommended for the health of all catfish involved keep them in numbers of AT LEAST 6 or more. That's what keep them happier,healthier, and keep bullying from happening.
Pgymies can be kept in a 10 gallon, but that is for more advanced people. 15 is what I recommend to all newbies.
 

Goldie&Yami

Member
I by no means mean this to sound mean. Just IMHO I feel like anybody that should make a care guide should be someone that has had a lot of experience with raising that said fish. This didn't state anything I don't already know by just "Googling Coryadoras"
 
  • Thread Starter

Aqua 59

Member
So sorry. Okay, I edited it.
 

Sarah73

Member
Goldie&Yami said:
I by no means mean this to sound mean. Just IMHO I feel like anybody that should make a care guide should be someone that has had a lot of experience with raising that said fish. This didn't state anything I don't already know by just "Googling Coryadoras"
I could make one if you want? Just thought there was enough information on corydoras.
 

BottomDweller

Member
Different cories have different requirements. SterbaI cories can be kept in very warm water but peppered cories need water around 73f or below. They also get to different sizes and need different tank sizes. For example emerald cories get to over 3" long and need a 48" tank minimum while pygmies stay small and can be ok in a 20 gallon high.
 

Sarah73

Member
BottomDweller said:
Different cories have different requirements. SterbaI cories can be kept in very warm water but peppered cories need water around 73f or below. They also get to different sizes and need different tank sizes. For example emerald cories get to over 3" long and need a 48" tank minimum while pygmies stay small and can be ok in a 20 gallon high.
Was just about to say that! Didn't give me a chance to finish
 

Goldie&Yami

Member
BottomDweller said:
Different cories have different requirements. SterbaI cories can be kept in very warm water but peppered cories need water around 73f or below. They also get to different sizes and need different tank sizes. For example emerald cories get to over 3" long and need a 48" tank minimum while pygmies stay small and can be ok in a 20 gallon high.
See these are all things I'm learning the hard way. I think most ppl classify cories as all the same. I know I did at first. Right now I have Venezuela cories(or my LFS called them emerald) with peppered cories in a 20 high with a temp of 76 to 77. So now I'm currently working on a 30 gallon for the bigger cories.
 

Sarah73

Member
Aqua 59 said:
Aqua 59 submitted a new resource:

Cories - A complete care guide to corydoras.



Read more about this resource...
Here is what I am willing to do. I can completely copy your thing and make many edits and credit you in it. Sadly goldie is right, but that also saves people from having to google cories themselves.
 
  • Thread Starter

Aqua 59

Member
Okay, thank you! I don't want anybody to have bad info.
 

Sarah73

Member
Aqua 59 said:
Okay, thank you! I don't want anybody to have bad info.
So that means I can edit it? I'll send you the final draft and you can post it . Just make sure to mention who helped .
 

Goldie&Yami

Member
Sarah73 said:
Here is what I am willing to do. I can completely copy your thing and make many edits and credit you in it. Sadly goldie is right, but that also saves people from having to google cories themselves.
I LIKE THIS IDEA!!
I think researchers and fish lovers alike need to have something to read that can have emphasis on the differences within this species but also something to go to debunk certain myths, ideals, or common misunderstandings about Cories. So then maybe so many of the same beginner's mistakes won't be made.
 

Sarah73

Member
I can also add photos of what to look for when you see breeding

Edit: OP select one species of corydoras that you want to make as informational. We can't do a general for all cories because there are so many cories in the world.
 

Goldie&Yami

Member
Sarah73 said:
I can also add photos of what to look for when you see breeding

Edit: OP select one species of corydoras that you want to make as informational. We can't do a general for all cories because there are so many cories in the world.
I think the most common ones is good. The ones I see most at numerous LFS is emerald/bronze/albino and peppered.
And yes I agree on the breeding. I've been thinking about making a breeding guide for newbies or the unprepared as you will. You know like a guide for those who weren't exactly trying to breed or expecting it to happen that would still like to raise the fry but have limited funds or resources. Based off my experiences I would hope that I could help at least one other person in the same situation as me.
 

Sarah73

Member
Goldie&Yami said:
I think the most common ones is good. The ones I see most at numerous LFS is emerald/bronze/albino and peppered.
And yes I agree on the breeding. I've been thinking about making a breeding guide for newbies or the unprepared as you will. You know like a guide for those who weren't exactly trying to breed or expecting it to happen that would still like to raise the fry but have limited funds or resources. Based off my experiences I would hope that I could help at least one other person in the same situation as me.
very fine crushed flakes will work . But yeah it CAN be hard to raise them to adults.
 
  • Thread Starter

Aqua 59

Member
Sarah73 said:
So that means I can edit it? I'll send you the final draft and you can post it . Just make sure to mention who helped .
Sure! I appreciate it.
 

Sarah73

Member
Aqua 59 said:
Sure! I appreciate it.
My head is hurting a lot. I could do it tomorrow or I can just tell you what to correct.
 
  • Thread Starter

Aqua 59

Member
You can do it tomorrow. Thanks!
 

r5n8xaw00

Member
Goldie&Yami said:
Not all cories are easy to breed, different breeds(pygmys can be kept in a 10 gallon), and what I see and most importantly and highly highly recommended for the health of all catfish involved. Keep them in numbers of AT LEAST 6 or more. That's what will keep them happier, healthier, and keep bullying from happening.
Get six or more!

I never can find more then 2 or three of the same breed at one time everywhere I go. I can go to five different lfs and find all different types of breeds but never 6 or more in the same place at the same time. I wanted all Sterbia but I have only ever found but one, period.
 

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