Converting 20 Gallon Hex

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BlazeitChris

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Alright so long story short, I now know why people don't like hex tanks when compared to normal rectangular tanks :dead:. After I re-homed my angels I considered trying a crayfish or maybe a couple of African Clawed frogs but I think I want to give reptiles a shot. My tank dimensions are: 21" height, 20" depth, 16" wide.

I did some research and it seems like the best beginner reptiles are either leopard geckos or crested geckos. Both have pros and cons so I don't know which one to choose for my first lizard.

My questions:
1) Can I use slate/ceramic tile as a substrate? I've seen it done with beardies and leopards but can't find anything on crested geckos. I want the tank to be easy to clean while looking nice so I don't want to use soil, repticarpet, or paper towels.

2) Do they need a special kind of light a heat lamp or UV, or will a normal desk lamp make due?

3) What kind of live plants can I put in the tank? I'd like some kind of vine for the sides and something to make the tank look more attractive.

Thanks.:;bananad2
 

CanadianFishFan

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I have a baby crested gecko. You may need to find a different lid because they need to be able to breath but not escape. Also tile could work but they keeping the humidity up would be hard. A crested gecko would work great because they like taller tanks as they climb up. They do need the a heater and I suggest a light so they know what night and day is because they are nocturnal. ( I suggest you research more on that) I don't know any live plants but make sure to have lots of them and things for them to climb on.
 
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BlazeitChris

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CanadianFishFan said:
I have a baby crested gecko. You may need to find a different lid because they need to be able to breath but not escape. Also tile could work but they keeping the humidity up would be hard. A crested gecko would work great because they like taller tanks as they climb up. They do need the a heater and I suggest a light so they know what night and day is because they are nocturnal. ( I suggest you research more on that) I don't know any live plants but make sure to have lots of them and things for them to climb on.
Why would having tile make the humidity hard to maintain? I figured if I could just mist whatever plants I decide to put in the tank as well as mist the walls to manage humidity. What kind of light do you use? There's so much variety out there!
 

CanadianFishFan

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BlazeitChris said:
Why would having tile make the humidity hard to maintain? I figured if I could just mist whatever plants I decide to put in the tank as well as mist the walls to manage humidity. What kind of light do you use? There's so much variety out there!
I have the Zoo med light stand with the light thing that the bulb goes in. I have a regular incandescent bulb and a heater one for night. The tile would not take in the moisture like soil or paper towel.
 
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BlazeitChris

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CanadianFishFan said:
I have the Zoo med light stand with the light thing that the bulb goes in. I have a regular incandescent bulb and a heater one for night. The tile would not take in the moisture like soil or paper towel.
I understand the humidity aspect of soil but I would imagine it would be exponentially more difficult to clean than tile? I've also read instances where soil begins to give off an unpleasant odor over time due to the presence of organic matter.
 

CanadianFishFan

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BlazeitChris said:
I understand the humidity aspect of soil but I would imagine it would be exponentially more difficult to clean than tile? I've also read instances where soil begins to give off an unpleasant odor over time due to the presence of organic matter.
I notice no smell from my EcoEarth... The tiles would be easy to clean with a small brush or just wipe it.
 

CatPlaysWithPets

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BlazeitChris said:
I understand the humidity aspect of soil but I would imagine it would be exponentially more difficult to clean than tile? I've also read instances where soil begins to give off an unpleasant odor over time due to the presence of organic matter.
I find it significantly easier with eco earth. All you really have to do is spot clean and then deep clean 1x a month
 
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