Conversion Cost.

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ranga97

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Hey Saltwater FL...
Well I have a standard Freshwater tropical setup with the usual - heater, light, filter, air pump (for bubble wall). And I was just curious as to how much it would cost to convert mine after the fish grow old and pass away. There are plenty of Saltwater/Reef aquarium shops around my area and they have really kind people as there owners.

P.S my current setup says that it is for marine tanks also.
 

JRDroid

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This depends if you are planing Fish only with live rock (FOWLR) or a Reef with corals. Lets say you are doing FOWLR. You can use your tank, lights and heater. You are going to need a protien skimmer (130 for the cheapest ones that are worth having) Live rock (1-2 pounds per gallon at around 3-5 dollars a pound usually), and sand (can be cheap or expensive depending on what you want). So for your 70L you are looking at $130 Skimmer + $55.50 live rock + $20 (20lbs of aquarium grade sand)= $205.50. If you want a reef system you will need new lighting too, which is very expensive. Its hard to estimate without knowing the dimensions of your tank, but the cheapest of T5 HO (cheapest lighting for corals) is around $100.
 
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ranga97

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what if i just have corals like mushrooms and zoointhids with my current lighting system, and is a Protein skimmer immediately necessary?
 

JRDroid

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I am not sure about that. I know they don't need as much light as other corals, but i do not know if standard florescent lighting is sufficient. From what I have seen, while not 100% required, a protein skimmer is considered the most important piece of equipment for a marine tank. You are not supposed to use a traditional filter on a marine tank (that's what the live rock is for) and a protein skimmer removes the stuff that algae requires to grow and that some fish are sensitive to. So without a protein skimmer you have to be super on top of your regular water changes or you can have out of control algae blooms and sick fish.
 

MizRamzi

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Most zoas and shrooms will do well under compact florescent/atenic. I'm not savey on liters but the general rule of thumb for Saltwater is 4w per gallon. Of course this does not apply to higher end corals-sps and lps. Hope this helps.
 
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ranga97

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Well that doesn't make me feel good, I have only got around 1.3watts per gallon...
 

new_sw_gurl

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You could convert to a FOWLR tank and as you get the funds, upgrade your lighting and add your corals. I do not run a protein skimmer and I don't have problems. The way I see it, if I need it later, I can purchase it. It's been 4 months....so far so good!! Also, I would look into filtration options. There are a ton of combinations you could run. You can run a refugium, you can run a canister, you can add live rock with each or no live rock at all for a Fish Only setup. There's so many options. Choose what you feel you can keep up with.
 
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ranga97

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dont worry guys, I think i'll just get a african cichlid tank.

Thnks anyway, I appreciate
(reason being is that I can't afford all of that expensive stuff and protein skimmers etc.)
 

Stang Man

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Lighting is a must with at least 6 to 12 watts per gallon still not sure about liters!!! Lol As for filter not a good filter for salt better to make your own sump with an aquarium very easy to do. Skimmer is a must for any salt water system in my eyes. On lighting you must have a good quality light such as T-5 or power compacts or metal hilide these are the most important pieces to have in a reef setup do some shopping around to see how much it would cost you our prices in US are way different and so is the dealers for purchuse if I where you being where you are I would deffeniatly change to salt you have all the good stuff!!!!!!
 
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ranga97

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Don't worry...
 
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ranga97

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Well, after lot's of thinking, I am going to make the leap!

How does this sound-
a 24x18x18 tank (33gal)
a 18x10x10 sump (~8 gal)
a pvc overflow (1/2in)
a ~1000lph (260gph) return pump/internal filter.
a 4 tube t5 light fitting (3.2 watts per gal)
my filter media, substrate, LR and another pump for the tank itself.

What other things would I need?
 

Stang Man

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For Over flow neeeds to be a 3/4 or preferebly a 1 inch pipe. As for pump a minimum of 650 GPH. Lighting needs more wattage per gallon. And the most important pice of equipment is a skimmer a venturi driven.
 
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ranga97

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Alright...
 

funkman262

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Is there any reason you're wanting to do a pvc overflow instead of drilling the tank? You're probably going to want to use a larger sump for a tank that size. Keep in mind that if there's a power failure (or if the pump fails), you're going to have some water emptying out from the display tank into the sump so you need to consider that. Many people do this by only filling the sump halfway or less. The larger your sump, the more you can fill it while still leaving enough empty space. And even more important, the more water volume, the better so if you have the space for it, get as large of a sump as possible. Depending on headloss, you'll also probably want a more powerful return pump. I'm using a maxi-jet 1200 for my 10 gallon at about 4 feet of head. Make sure that your overflow is large enough to keep up with the return pump. If not, your display tank will flood (which is why Stang Man recommended larger diameter pipe). I think the minimum flow that Stang Man suggested (650gph), I think he's referring to the total flow, not the return pump flow (but he can correct me if I misunderstood). In other words, if you're return pump is flowing at 200gph after headloss, you'll want an internal pump with a minimum flow rate of 450gph. This isn't a definite rule though. I've heard of people having success with really high flow systems and others have done fine with low flow. It really depends on the fish and corals chosen. For an internal pump, I like the koralias because they have a nice diffused flow. Hope this helps
 
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ranga97

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I don't want to get my tank drilled because if I don't want it with a sump anymore, there will be a hole in it.
 
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