Constant Ammonia

A. Rozhin

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Ok so what I’m getting from this is to test bottled water see what the readings are. If I get that there is ammonia in the bottle water I know that my kit is off. But if there turns out to be ammonia in my well water what should I do then.
The bottled water is your control group. Test bottled, then tap/well, then tank. If it turns out all three shows ammonia, your kit is off. If it turns out tap and tank show ammonia, that's ammonia in your tap water, and the nitrogen cycle will take care of it just as if it came from a fish. You just need to allow for it and watch that it doesn't creep up past that amount, which means you are in a mini cycle. As long as you know your parameters, you can allow for them in your assessment of what to do with your readings. Good luck! I'd like to see how it turns out, the ammonia issue is interesting to me.

Edit: "If it turns out ONLY tap and tank show ammonia, then..."

@A. Rozhin is right ladies and gents. The nitrogen cycle doesn’t just refer to aquariums. It happens everywhere. If your well water has ammonia or nitrogen of some form, buy distilled water and use that for your water changes.
With respect, you don't want distilled, then you have to end up adding minerals back in. Your best course of action is R/O water (almost all "spring water" in the grocery store is regular water purified with reverse osmosis). Your only issue then is watching that the pH isn't too low (most R/O comes in at about 6.5). IMO, distilled water is a very bad choice.
 

Redshark1

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If ammonia is a naturally occuring compound why are we insisting on it being zero? That's not natural.

If fish produce ammonia constantly how can we ever achieve zero ammonia? That would be illogical.

I get the impression people are not using logic when discussing ammonia.

Surely all we need to achieve is total ammonia below the toxic level since we have agreed what level is toxic through scientific study.

The river near my house has total ammonia at 0.3 ppm.

My tap water has total ammonia at 0.25 ppm.

My five tanks have total ammonia at 0.25 ppm (one of them for 24 years).

My water butt (with no fish) has ammonia at much less than 0.25 ppm (yellow).

In my community free ammonia is considered toxic by the authorities at 0.02 ppm.

For my pH and temperature total ammonia becomes toxic at 2.5 ppm (i.e. produces 0.02 ppm free ammonia) if I believe the science.

So I don't worry about 0.25 ppm total ammonia because this is a tenth of the limit given and I have always found this figure when fish are present in my water.
 

A. Rozhin

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If ammonia is a naturally occuring compound why are we insisting on it being zero? That's not natural.

If fish produce ammonia constantly how can we ever achieve zero ammonia? That would be illogical.

I get the impression people are not using logic when discussing ammonia.

Surely all we need to achieve is total ammonia below the toxic level since we have agreed what level is toxic through scientific study.

The river near my house has total ammonia at 0.3 ppm.

My tap water has total ammonia at 0.25 ppm.

My five tanks have total ammonia at 0.25 ppm (one of them for 24 years).

My water butt (with no fish) has ammonia at much less than 0.25 ppm (yellow).

In my community free ammonia is considered toxic by the authorities at 0.02 ppm.

For my pH and temperature total ammonia becomes toxic at 2.5 ppm (i.e. produces 0.02 ppm free ammonia) if I believe the science.

So I don't worry about 0.25 ppm total ammonia because this is a tenth of the limit given and I have always found this figure when fish are present in my water.
Fish constantly produce ammonia, but if the biofilter is good, it is almost immediately changed to nitrite, then nitrate. Wherever the ammonia comes from, the biofilter will make these changes, whether endemic in the tap water, produced by fish, combination, etc.

If you test your ammonia in your tank and it does not come up 0, your fish are suffering. If you don't worry about .25 ppm ammonia, that's fine. Some people let their kids sleep in rooms with asbestos ceilings. Some people smoke cigarettes around their kids. It's always your choice, how you care for those who are in your care.
 

Algonquin

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if you put the vial against the white part of the card it will be easier to tell what colour it is....
 

Baba

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Fish constantly produce ammonia, but if the biofilter is good, it is almost immediately changed to nitrite, then nitrate. Wherever the ammonia comes from, the biofilter will make these changes, whether endemic in the tap water, produced by fish, combination, etc.

If you test your ammonia in your tank and it does not come up 0, your fish are suffering. If you don't worry about .25 ppm ammonia, that's fine. Some people let their kids sleep in rooms with asbestos ceilings. Some people smoke cigarettes around their kids. It's always your choice, how you care for those who are in your care.
I think what @Redshark1 wants to say, is that with his pH the free ammonia (NH3) is below the threshold to be considered toxic. The API test kit doesn't discriminate between NH3 or NH4, it will give you the total value. So having a reading of 0.25ppm doesn't necessarily mean you are killing your fish or smoking a cigar in your kid's bedroom while they sip on your moonshine out of asbestos cups.
 

Algonquin

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So was the 0 reading on your tank or tap? Did you test some bottled water? If you could take pics with the vials against the white part of the card and post them, you could get a second opinion (and 3rd, 4th, 5th... )

PS. wondering if there is ammonia in moonshine lol
 
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