Constant Algae Issues

dmarcus13

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I have an Aqueon 10 gallon tank with 3 happy guppies and 2 snails. But for most of the five months as a beginner fish owner, I have dealt with an annoying algae problem.

At first it was an algae bloom that turned my water green. I solved this after using the Green Killing Machine UV filter. However, now it’s just weekly algae growth on my glass, gravel, plant, snail shells and all over my filter, cartridge and ammonia controlling sponge.

I feed my guppies tropical flakes or blood worms. They are fed twice a day. The tank is not by a window. I keep the light on for an average of 8 hours/day. And I change about 25% water weekly and use Prime with my new water.

Like I said, my fish are happy and water levels are tested and in good shape. I’m wondering what I should be doing differently Should I invest in new equipment? I have a Quietflow10 filter. And my UV filter I’ve only used once several months ago after my water turned green.

I’ve attached photos.

Thanks in advance!

Dave
 

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_xXDrowning_In_TanksXx_

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I would use the Twinstar Nano Algae Inhibitor from buceplant. It's expensive, but since you're having consistant problems, it seems worth your while.
 

jjohnwm

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I can't tell from the photos; is your tank planted? I see a leaf or two but not sure if it's real or plastic.

If planted, you should start to see the algae becoming less prevalent once the plants begin to fill in and grow. If not planted...the photoperiod should be cut way back.

Lightly planted tanks are tough; the plants require light, but small numbers of plants will never out-compete algae for nutrients, so...you get over-run with the stuff. Starting with more plants helps in this respect. Floating plants, especially types that actually float on top of the surface, like duckweed, water lettuce, frogbit, etc. are great because they shade the water (bad for algae) and also usually grow quickly which translates to excellent nutrient (nitrate) utilization. The more they "eat"...the less there is for the algae.

.
 

DuaneV

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I mean, algae IS a sign of a healthy tank. Its a growing plant, produces oxygen and absorbs ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. Personally, I like algae. Not only does it filter the water, produce oxygen and give your fish a healthy snack, I think it makes the tank look more natural.

If you really want it gone, dial back the lights. 8 hours is pretty long. 6 hours max is really all you need, maybe less depending on what plants you have.
 
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dmarcus13

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It is very lightly planted. I have one plant, and three betta buddies (from when I previously had bettas in my tank, R.I.P.). The plant that is currently in used to be bigger but over time I’ve had to remove dead leaves.

I attached a picture of the tank after it was fully cleaned.


jjohnwm said:
I can't tell from the photos; is your tank planted? I see a leaf or two but not sure if it's real or plastic.

If planted, you should start to see the algae becoming less prevalent once the plants begin to fill in and grow. If not planted...the photoperiod should be cut way back.

Lightly planted tanks are tough; the plants require light, but small numbers of plants will never out-compete algae for nutrients, so...you get over-run with the stuff. Starting with more plants helps in this respect. Floating plants, especially types that actually float on top of the surface, like duckweed, water lettuce, frogbit, etc. are great because they shade the water (bad for algae) and also usually grow quickly which translates to excellent nutrient (nitrate) utilization. The more they "eat"...the less there is for the algae.

.
Ok thanks! That makes me feel better. I wasn’t aware of the benefits of algae.

Part of my concern beyond just aesthetics and having to clean the objects in my tank is that my filter, (the cartridge and sponge) are overridden with the algae. So I wasn’t sure if this is a big deal.

I’ll see what happens with a change to 6 hours of lights per day.


DuaneV said:
I mean, algae IS a sign of a healthy tank. Its a growing plant, produces oxygen and absorbs ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. Personally, I like algae. Not only does it filter the water, produce oxygen and give your fish a healthy snack, I think it makes the tank look more natural.

If you really want it gone, dial back the lights. 8 hours is pretty long. 6 hours max is really all you need, maybe less depending on what plants you have.
 

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aae0130

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Some times algae is caused by high phosphates in the water. It can be like that straight from the tap. There are some chemicals available that reduce phosphates if it is the issue. Also, the carbon in filters releases phosphates into the water column. It isn’t usually a problem unless you are already plagued with high phosphates from your source water.
 

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