Common Goldfish In A Semitropical Tank.

Josh McVay

Active Member
Member
Messages
62
Reaction score
18
Location
Hampton, Virginia
Experience
Just started
I have a very healthy community tank and while I was working at my local pet store, I couldn't help noticing that a few of the common goldfish that we market as feeder fish were absolutely gorgeous. And I couldn't bring myself to let them get eaten, so I brought them home and accilmated them to the aforementioned semitropical tank.

My first worry was that it was too warm for them, but they seem to be thriving in the 75°f water. I did a bit of research and found that they live anywhere between 65-72° temperatures. I felt a bit more comfortable knowing that. I also have a bubbler that oxygenates the water pretty nicely, so oxygen is of no issue.

My second worry was of the other fish in my 55 gallon. One is a 5.5 inch long rainbow shark that is relatively nice to the other fish, but I wasn't sure of his appreciation towards the two new karp in the tank. After a day, I realized Salvador (my shark) is mild mannered towards them and tolerate them even better than he does my raphael catfish. I also have a few bolivian rams (6) that I was most worried about due to their need to have prestine water (which is the current condition) and karp tend to be pretty dirty. After a bit of time of that worry lingering in my head, I realized that I have a 90 gallon filter pumping way more water than necessary (I like a prestine tank) and a green machine running as well. I do 30% water changes weekly, siphoning the gravel very well each time. So my worry of dirty water is not necessary.

I know that rams do get aggressive at breeding time, but they have yet to show intense fin biting aggression, even on momma's time of the month after laying her eggs. Hahaha. So I am not much worried about that. If it becomes a problem, I can easily remove the goldfish.

To my surprise, my impulse buy is not all that bad. In fact, it adds a lot of personality to my tank that was rather dull before. The 4 inch pretty karps are, as far as I can tell, THRIVING and loving the tank. My other fish still act normal on top of that. Sometimes the rams check them out, but never nibble.

I can't help feeling I had that crazy stroke of luck you hear about every now and then. However, Many people say their goldfish died in such conditions within a few days. Mine have been going strong and... not even remotely sick for a week and a half.

What is everyone's thoughts on this? I can already tell there will be some "NO! WHAT ARE YOU DOING's" and some "GET THOSE POOR GOLDFISH OUT OF THERE's", but I see no problems, whatsoever. They are a lot happier than they were in that cramped feeder tank.

(Never thought I would have both the goldfish and tropical hashtags in the same post. Hahahaha!)
 

Carrot29

New Member
Member
Messages
25
Reaction score
9
Location
Canada
Experience
1 year
I mean I've read about Oscars living with bettas... So I'm not surprised that your set up is working, and I'm glad it is working for you! It's very interesting to see unique fish interacting with each other, who in nature wouldn't. I hope that your fish continue to tolerate each other nonetheless! Just be careful, over time your rainbow or rams might try to assert themselves after they're familiar with the 2 karps, as they're innately competitive.
 

Sion

Active Member
Member
Messages
304
Reaction score
178
Location
UK
Experience
More than 10 years
Common goldfish will quickly outgrow your tank, they grow to several feet long. Unless you can rehome the goldfish to a pond, I think you'll run into water quality issues within a few months and start losing fish.
 

FishFish221

Well Known
Member
Messages
3,287
Reaction score
1,500
Location
Ontario, Canada
Experience
3 years
First of all, there's stunting. The goldfish are able to grow to about a feet to a feet and a half, but in a tank that size their growth will get stunted and may never reach that size, which can also decrease their lifespan and increase the chance of health problems.

The goldfish may also start getting more aggressive as they grow, because of the lack of space.
 

Taff

Active Member
Member
Messages
277
Reaction score
146
Location
Wales
Experience
More than 10 years
HI there, Bolivian Rams are just about the most hardy, forgiving and least aggressive dwarf cichlid. They are great fish but there is a limit to how much nitrate they can cope with.


Having massive over filtration will deal with the ammonia and nitrite produced but of course it all turns to nitrate in the end.

Under normal conditions 30% water changes are adequate but when overfiltering a high bioload they may be required every other or with 2 x 12"+ goldfish every day.

Apart from the size of the goldfish which many have already questioned; I would plead for you to test nitrate twice a week (remembering to beat the living daylights out of bottle #2 as per instructions). Otherwise nitrate levels could reach extreme levels while your fish do not show it (but it is causing major health issues down the road). I have known Bolivian Rams to survive apparently OK with 160ppm nitrate! However their owner thought something was wrong with the fish as they never paired up or bred. After testing their water; giving proper advice in terms of how much water needed to be changed for that tanks bioload; throwing in a few handfuls of water sprite etc thus getting nitrates down below 10ppm they started breeding.
 

tunafax

Well Known
Member
Messages
1,267
Reaction score
788
Location
Canada
Goldfish will be more or less alright up to mid-highish seventies. The biggest issue with warm water is lack of air. Get enough aerators and water movement and bubblers and all that stuff, and it won't be the problem.
Overstocking & water quality will be your problem. One of those goldfish will be making more waste than the entire stock of your tank, so whatever filtration you had on it, I guarantee you'll need to at least double it. Also tank size, but ehhh someone else can get to that. Congrats on karps.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
OP
Josh McVay

Josh McVay

Active Member
Member
Messages
62
Reaction score
18
Location
Hampton, Virginia
Experience
Just started
Awesome. I was thinking I would put them in their own tank when I move. They are only 4 inches long right now, so I am not too incredibly worried about it at the moment. I will test everything every few days to be sure it is fine. Worst case scenereo, I give yhem to my friend, eho has a koI pond. I am sure he won't refuse taking them.

Also, karps was just me trying to sound funny.
 

KakeHugs

Well Known
Member
Messages
662
Reaction score
273
Experience
5 to 10 years
Running them at high temperature isn't going to harm them
I'm sure like everyone else is saying you will have to move them eventually but I have had to do the same thing before. My goldfish get stuck inside for the winter and they hate me for it lol
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #10
OP
Josh McVay

Josh McVay

Active Member
Member
Messages
62
Reaction score
18
Location
Hampton, Virginia
Experience
Just started
I have deceided to separate them into their own tank with my 4 gambusia I have been trying to breed. I haven't had much success, so it will be alright. The gambusia can take room temperature water. I actually caught them where the temperature is 65-75 average over the course of 4 months or so. They are...... Extremely hardy fish. I bet I couldn'tkill them if I tried.

To answer a few questions:

Taff said:
HI there, Bolivian Rams are just about the most hardy, forgiving and least aggressive dwarf cichlid. They are great fish but there is a limit to how much nitrate they can cope with.


Having massive over filtration will deal with the ammonia and nitrite produced but of course it all turns to nitrate in the end.

Under normal conditions 30% water changes are adequate but when overfiltering a high bioload they may be required every other or with 2 x 12"+ goldfish every day.

Apart from the size of the goldfish which many have already questioned; I would plead for you to test nitrate twice a week (remembering to beat the living daylights out of bottle #2 as per instructions). Otherwise nitrate levels could reach extreme levels while your fish do not show it (but it is causing major health issues down the road). I have known Bolivian Rams to survive apparently OK with 160ppm nitrate! However their owner thought something was wrong with the fish as they never paired up or bred. After testing their water; giving proper advice in terms of how much water needed to be changed for that tanks bioload; throwing in a few handfuls of water sprite etc thus getting nitrates down below 10ppm they started breeding.
Nitrates and nitrites are fine in the 55 community tank, even after taking them out. I tend to test it bimonthly. My bolivian rams have become beautiful. They have bright red pectoral fins and red rims on their dorsal and tail fins. Two of my girls aren't quite as colorful yet, as I just bought them. They are, however, gettingmore colorful by the day. I dare say my rams are happy. ;P

FishFish221 said:
First of all, there's stunting. The goldfish are able to grow to about a feet to a feet and a half, but in a tank that size their growth will get stunted and may never reach that size, which can also decrease their lifespan and increase the chance of health problems.

The goldfish may also start getting more aggressive as they grow, because of the lack of space.
Thanks for the info. I may donate them to my friend's pond at the price of getting to visit them every now and then.

Sion said:
Common goldfish will quickly outgrow your tank, they grow to several feet long. Unless you can rehome the goldfish to a pond, I think you'll run into water quality issues within a few months and start losing fish.
I will be doing that shortly. Goldfish do tend to grow slower in a tank, so I will hold onto the 4-inch fellas for a bit.

Carrot29 said:
I mean I've read about Oscars living with bettas... So I'm not surprised that your set up is working, and I'm glad it is working for you! It's very interesting to see unique fish interacting with each other, who in nature wouldn't. I hope that your fish continue to tolerate each other nonetheless! Just be careful, over time your rainbow or rams might try to assert themselves after they're familiar with the 2 karps, as they're innately competitive.
Yep! I have put them into their own tank with some gambudia, however. I love the karps, but I will be donating them to a pond. They are gorgeous. :'/
 

puffer boi

Well Known
Member
Messages
912
Reaction score
235
Experience
1 year
Josh McVay said:
Awesome. I was thinking I would put them in their own tank when I move. They are only 4 inches long right now, so I am not too incredibly worried about it at the moment. I will test everything every few days to be sure it is fine. Worst case scenereo, I give yhem to my friend, eho has a koI pond. I am sure he won't refuse taking them.

Also, karps was just me trying to sound funny.
that worst case scenario sounds more like a best case scenario. the goldfish will get stunted so they will die a lot sooner in ur tank. I would give to friend so that they can be happy
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
OP
Josh McVay

Josh McVay

Active Member
Member
Messages
62
Reaction score
18
Location
Hampton, Virginia
Experience
Just started
puffer boi said:
that worst case scenario sounds more like a best case scenario. the goldfish will get stunted so they will die a lot sooner in ur tank. I would give to friend so that they can be happy
Alrighty. Either way, it is better than being eaten by a snapping turtle or massive cichlid. But you are right. I will get them a good home.
 

peapod

New Member
Member
Messages
25
Reaction score
6
I wonder if yoy have some photos. Would love to ser these little fellas. They sound rather nice.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
OP
Josh McVay

Josh McVay

Active Member
Member
Messages
62
Reaction score
18
Location
Hampton, Virginia
Experience
Just started
peapod said:
I wonder if yoy have some photos. Would love to ser these little fellas. They sound rather nice.
Here is one of them. I wish I disn't have to get rid of them. The other one isn't quite as pretty, but it is close. I am reeeeaally thinking about keeping them until I move, then setting up the 40gal (yes. I know that isn't enough, but I already have it and will be moving within the year) This will give me plenty of time to get another 55 or a 75 for them. This is the tank that I have been trying to breed the gambusia in. The green thing is a mesh box that I am keeping mamma in.
 

Attachments

peapod

New Member
Member
Messages
25
Reaction score
6
Josh McVay said:
Here is one of them. I wish I disn't have to get rid of them. The other one isn't quite as pretty, but it is close. I am reeeeaally thinking about keeping them until I move, then setting up the 40gal (yes. I know that isn't enough, but I already have it and will be moving within the year) This will give me plenty of time to get another 55 or a 75 for them. This is the tank that I have been trying to breed the gambusia in. The green thing is a mesh box that I am keeping mamma in.
cute! Now you made me want to dig a outdoor pond.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #16
OP
Josh McVay

Josh McVay

Active Member
Member
Messages
62
Reaction score
18
Location
Hampton, Virginia
Experience
Just started
peapod said:
cute! Now you made me want to dig a outdoor pond.
Yesssssss. I would love to, as well. But I have no clue how and I would have to wait until I move into a real house. Hahahaha. I might end up doing that instead of keeping a 75 for them. I think they would be really happy in a several hundred gallon pond. Hmmm. My dream is to build a shed and put a 2000-3000 gallon aquarium to keep peakock bass and other fancy fish in. Maybe I could also build a pond in it. (Yes. I know this sounds crazy, but I believe I can make it happen)
 

peapod

New Member
Member
Messages
25
Reaction score
6
Josh McVay said:
Yesssssss. I would love to, as well. But I have no clue how and I would have to wait until I move into a real house. Hahahaha. I might end up doing that instead of keeping a 75 for them. I think they would be really happy in a several hundred gallon pond. Hmmm. My dream is to build a shed and put a 2000-3000 gallon aquarium to keep peakock bass and other fancy fish in. Maybe I could also build a pond in it. (Yes. I know this sounds crazy, but I believe I can make it happen)
I live in new zealand and it costs about 4000-5000 nzd to have a pond build professionally. But I think it would cost a lot more less if we do DIYs, might still have to hire a digger or it might take forever digging that...
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #18
OP
Josh McVay

Josh McVay

Active Member
Member
Messages
62
Reaction score
18
Location
Hampton, Virginia
Experience
Just started
That is true... I think the most efficient way to do it is to rent a small excavator. Hm.
 

New Threads

Similar Threads

Follow FishLore!

FishLore on Social Media

Online statistics

Members online
286
Guests online
3,517
Total visitors
3,803

Aquarium Photo Contests

Aquarium Calculator

Top Bottom