Comfortable light level for betta

Vince3
  • #1
I've been seeing more attention to bettas not liking bright light, maybe because of it being mentioned in Fluval's video on betta care. What has your experience been? Would you say that plants for betta aquariums should be low-light, so that a more subdued light can be used?

Thanks!
 

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SanDiegoRedneck
  • #2
I've been seeing more attention to bettas not liking bright light, maybe because of it being mentioned in Fluval's video on betta care. What has your experience been? Would you say that plants for betta aquariums should be low-light, so that a more subdued light can be used?

Thanks!
As long as the betta has cover to get to shade when needed you should be ok with normal lighting.
Ps. Never seen that video.
I did respond to one of your old threads saying be careful of high light but from what I remember your tank is heavily planted. So that's good.
 

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swimmingslowly
  • #3
I was just wondering this myself. Anyone have any ideas on how to DIY dim my LED light? My Betta has areas for shade from the light but it’s still pretty bright.
 
Vince3
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
I was just wondering this myself. Anyone have any ideas on how to DIY dim my LED light? My Betta has areas for shade from the light but it’s still pretty bright.
What fixture do you have?

I think the best option is an adjustable fixture.
 
swimmingslowly
  • #5
What fixture do you have?

I think the best option is an adjustable fixture.

Nothing fancy it came with the TopFin 5 gallon retreat so I doubt there’s any dimmers that will attach to it?
 
Lisanna
  • #6
I've been seeing more attention to bettas not liking bright light, maybe because of it being mentioned in Fluval's video on betta care. What has your experience been? Would you say that plants for betta aquariums should be low-light, so that a more subdued light can be used?

Thanks!
During the day, your betta can just use natural sunlight. Yes, don't make your light too bright, as bettas' are shy little fish. They like to hide in things. Sometimes if a betta is newly transitioned/stressed/mating, they might want privacy, and having a light shining on them does not help.
At nightime, if you want your betta's sleep schedule to match yours, then turn the lights off so it might be easier for your fish to sleep. But normally, yes, I think a subdues light is better.
 

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Rose of Sharon
  • #7
My tanks came with led lights, but I don't use them. I bought a few led lights that are made to work with computers (powered by usb connections) because they have 3 settings. I can move them around the outside of the tanks as I like. I bought power strips with usb connections, and have the lights plugged into them. I can turn them off at night, low in the morning when the bettas are waking up, higher in the late morning and at feeding time, then down again. Just an idea. It works for us!
 
Vince3
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
Nothing fancy it came with the TopFin 5 gallon retreat so I doubt there’s any dimmers that will attach to it?
From what I've seen about LEDs in general, I think not all fixtures are compatible with dimmers. I'd guess the integrated kit light isn't compatible. TopFin might have a customer service number that could confirm that for you.
 
cdw202x
  • #9
I've been seeing more attention to bettas not liking bright light, maybe because of it being mentioned in Fluval's video on betta care. What has your experience been? Would you say that plants for betta aquariums should be low-light, so that a more subdued light can be used?

Thanks!

I have found that none of the bettas I've had like bright lights, especially the plakats. I thought maybe it was just the one I had that came with the TopFin tank (as you have) (and I actually started a thread about it a while ago: LINK_HERE), but actually the fish just didn't like lots of artificial light. My workaround for this was just to move the bettas to the sunniest room in my place and so far, this has worked wonderfully. The fish get natural sunlight (and darkness) so their daylight schedule matches up with mine and also the sunlight helps the plants grow.

That being said, I realize not everyone has this option, and for a while, testing out different lights, I ditched the TopFin light and the PennPlax light and went with this one from Amazon BeamsWork EA Full Spectrum LED. This particular model has a red light in it, which seemed to help the fish relax a little more and also the plants (java ferns) grew noticeably better in this one. I never did purchase the adapter for a timer for that one, but it does have one as well.
 
kansas
  • #10
Part of my betta tank has a thick mat of salvinia and part that i keep the surface open, so part of the tank is quite dark and part is bringt. I also have some hides that are dark.
 

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Vince3
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
I have found that none of the bettas I've had like bright lights, especially the plakats. I thought maybe it was just the one I had that came with the TopFin tank (as you have) (and I actually started a thread about it a while ago: LINK_HERE), but actually the fish just didn't like lots of artificial light. My workaround for this was just to move the bettas to the sunniest room in my place and so far, this has worked wonderfully. The fish get natural sunlight (and darkness) so their daylight schedule matches up with mine and also the sunlight helps the plants grow.
Unfortunately, the rooms where I have my aquariums don't quite have enough indirect sunlight for the plants. If I had that option, I'd definitely try it.

I have a 10 gallon with a plakat, and in another room a 5.5 gallon with a plakat. I've tried a couple of LED fixtures (both of which had white, red, and blue lights), as well as an Aqueon daylight T8 fluorescent bulb. The T8 is warmer and more subdued on both aquariums. Unfortunately, the 5.5 gallon gets overrun with algae with the T8. I have an Aqueon 12-inch Optibright on it, which is working out well. Since it doesn't span the whole tank, it's almost as subdued as the T8. On the 10 gallon, the T8 seems best. It's the most subdued of all the lights I've tried, and it's enough for my low-light plants.

Part of my betta tank has a thick mat of salvinia and part that i keep the surface open, so part of the tank is quite dark and part is bringt. I also have some hides that are dark.
I like the idea of a brighter area and dimmer area.
 
kansas
  • #12
Unfortunately, the rooms where I have my aquariums don't quite have enough indirect sunlight for the plants. If I had that option, I'd definitely try it.

I have a 10 gallon with a plakat, and in another room a 5.5 gallon with a plakat. I've tried a couple of LED fixtures (both of which had white, red, and blue lights), as well as an Aqueon daylight T8 fluorescent bulb. The T8 is warmer and more subdued on both aquariums. Unfortunately, the 5.5 gallon gets overrun with algae with the T8. I have an Aqueon 12-inch Optibright on it, which is working out well. Since it doesn't span the whole tank, it's almost as subdued as the T8. On the 10 gallon, the T8 seems best. It's the most subdued of all the lights I've tried, and it's enough for my low-light plants.


I like the idea of a brighter area and dimmer area.
a combination of a high surface flow and a lot of trimming keep an area open.
 
BettaRR
  • #13
I've been seeing more attention to bettas not liking bright light, maybe because of it being mentioned in Fluval's video on betta care. What has your experience been? Would you say that plants for betta aquariums should be low-light, so that a more subdued light can be used?

Thanks!

I have the same tank as you. I settled on unusual solution to cure this problem, but it has worked and my plants have continued to grow. I can't even tell you how I came up with the idea, but I got some duct tape (the original grey duct tape), cut a piece the entire length of the light.

Now you want to take that piece you just cut and cut them into three pieces, the long way. Then you get those three pieces and tape each row of three lights (I going by memory, maybe there are four rows of light, but cut the number of strips needed to match the number of rows on the light). The duct tape softens the bright light, while still providing plenty of light into the tank to not only see your fish, but maintain the life of live (low light) plants.

I did it about three or four months ago and it's worked out nicely for me. Just beware, I am not sure what might happen to the light if you try to remove the duct tape at a later date. I'm really happy with how it looks though and have no plans to ever remove it (I tried other fixes before this one, and they just didn't work for one reason or another).
 
BettaRR
  • #14
Another idea that I used before the duct tape had promise, but I just don't have the material and I've never been into a store that sells material. But I actually got a piece of the white material that is use to wrap electronics in packaging. Almost all electronics come wrapped in it, I have the same white material sitting next to me from my tablet. I cut a piece of it out making it fit the too of the aquarium perfectly, and just laid it directly on the top of the aquarium, below the light. This specific material was too thick and blocked out too much light.

But if you experiment with other see thru material, and feel comfortable in a material store, you could probably achieve the perfect light in the tank with this option at a very minimal cost, and you could then easily discard it or move it when the time comes.
 
Vince3
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
a combination of a high surface flow and a lot of trimming keep an area open.
With bettas preferring still water, how do you maintain high surface flow?
 

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