CO2 System for 75g

Dadio

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Yep, Co2 setups whether DIY or hightech have there challenges. Having played a great deal with DIY, what I found was that keeping the levels right are the biggest point. I resorted to a constant 1 bpm running 24hrs with my DIY (my setup gives me 4 weeks min before a recharge is needed), half dose of excel 1 once a week and controlled lighting have worked best for my O2A tank. I also found that lighting is one of if not the most important part of a tank, especially when trying to mimick true natural lighting cycles.
 
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Dom90

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Dadio said:
Yep, Co2 setups whether DIY or hightech have there challenges. Having played a great deal with DIY, what I found was that keeping the levels right are the biggest point. I resorted to a constant 1 bpm running 24hrs with my DIY (my setup gives me 4 weeks min before a recharge is needed), half dose of excel 1 once a week and controlled lighting have worked best for my O2A tank. I also found that lighting is one of if not the most important part of a tank, especially when trying to mimick true natural lighting cycles.
Then I'm assuming that lighting itself is even more important than co2 and nutrients then? So it's safe to say plants will still grow with high light even when co2 and nutrients are at a minimum (just relying on fish waste as opposed to liquid/dry ferts)?


 

Dadio

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Dom90 said:
Then I'm assuming that lighting itself is even more important than co2 and nutrients then? So it's safe to say plants will still grow with high light even when co2 and nutrients are at a minimum (just relying on fish waste as opposed to liquid/dry ferts)?
Let me explain it as this.

I have a 3200g waterpond and a few tanks and the only difference for me is, one is inside, the other outside.

Many people are having or have had the very same issues in ponds as we do in tanks and visa-verse where lighting is the culprit most of the time.

What I attempted to do when building my O2A tank was in part bring in what I also learned from pond building. Fighting algae is the same for both, same goes for plants and livestock.

My pond is setup to be in essence as natural as possible, yet controlled or should I say balanced. I use no ferts what so ever for the pond, in fact, I use the pond water for my non-ferted heritage seed garden. I used trellis, landscaping and vines to control natural lighting to offshoot evaporation, temperate rise and yet allow me to flower rose lotus and keep algae at bay. I've added a 55watt UV (on timer dusk to dawn), DIY filtration and efficient circulation of the waterways. In a pond structure, there is good algae that is very beneficial for stock and water quality just as there is bad. Same goes for tanks. The discharge of my koI feeds my water plants for the most part and the rest is taken care of by filtration.

Light plays a very major factor in the creation of life, without light not much creation happens. Nutrients require light in order to be used (photosynthesis) or broken down for assimilation. Moonlight also stimulates life; so how does one recreate this inside while keeping our creativity and personal tastes in the design process balanced? That is the major challenge we all face.

Here's what I can say more, when I set-out to build my O2A tank, it was my first tank in 20 years. From the very first, my concern was lighting. I was wowed by the features(gadgets) of one brand but it failed in essence to give me what I wanted. Sure it was(is) a stunning set-up, but still lacked something. After the failure(s), I wanted to take it another step forward and found what I believe to be the closest to what I achieve in ponds. The GroBeams which replaced my other unit give it that vibrant, natural light I wanted. The depth of light reach is better and shows in the regrow now present.

As for Co2, sure it can bring a fast lush growth, but one error and if the tank is dependant on this the tank will be at risk of a crash, and in worse case, death of stock. At first I had by bpm's just pushing it out with my previous led, all gung-ho to get that lush growth we all see in many setups, but now I realize patience is the most important part in this hobby.

Now with the unit I'm using my bpm is as stated (1 bpm) and most likely stop using it all together.
 

Donald Corbett

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I've been running this kit for over a year now. A ph controller is better all the way around. It eliminates guess work and fish obviously do better with stability. As far as upgrading light first that's the worst idea. Too much light without co2 is instant algae issues. Get co2 with you're current lights and start it off at maybe 15ppm (.5 ph drop). I use online diffusers on two tanks with good results. A planted+ is a good amount of light even for co2 so I wouldn't be too worried.
 

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