CO2 for Beginners

Bentley

I have a nine gallon betta tank with low maintenance plants: Java fern, various Anubias, and Christmas moss. The Java fern is turning brown and yellow pretty rapidly. I am dosing with Flourish, but I’m wondering if the temperature is too high for Java fern (78 degrees).

I’m also battling a minor algae problem.

I’ve long considered adding co2 to my tank to manage algae and encourage plant growth (I’d love to see an Anubias flower!). I’d also like to add some plants that require co2.

Can anyone recommend a beginner-level co2 system? I’ve thought about the bottles with the gel mixes, but I’m not sure how well they work.

Also open to any recommendations and tips on optimal lighting for plants mentioned above. I have a programmable Current LED light, and I’m not sure how to program the lights to best benefit the plants.

Thank you!
 

Jojo205

I don’t know the answers to most of your questions, but I definitely know your tank isn’t too warm for the java fern. My tank is 79, sometimes 80 degrees (I have a hard time reading the thermometer and my heater isn’t super accurate) and the java fern is doing just fine.
 
Upvote 0

Bentley

I don’t know the answers to most of your questions, but I definitely know your tank isn’t too warm for the java fern. My tank is 79, sometimes 80 degrees (I have a hard time reading the thermometer and my heater isn’t super accurate) and the java fern is doing just fine.
Thanks!
 
Upvote 0

Backblast72

I have a nine gallon betta tank with low maintenance plants: Java fern, various Anubias, and Christmas moss. The Java fern is turning brown and yellow pretty rapidly. I am dosing with Flourish, but I’m wondering if the temperature is too high for Java fern (78 degrees).

I’m also battling a minor algae problem.

I’ve long considered adding co2 to my tank to manage algae and encourage plant growth (I’d love to see an Anubias flower!). I’d also like to add some plants that require co2.

Can anyone recommend a beginner-level co2 system? I’ve thought about the bottles with the gel mixes, but I’m not sure how well they work.

Also open to any recommendations and tips on optimal lighting for plants mentioned above. I have a programmable Current LED light, and I’m not sure how to program the lights to best benefit the plants.

Thank you!
Good Evening Bentley,
In a nine gallon tank a small CO2 system would go a long way. As far as this I personally use a DIY kit and it works great for me. I bought my kit on Amazon from a company call ZRDR; it uses a combination of Citric Acid and Baking Soda plus water. I bought the 2 liter bottle. Which on your nine gallon should last you a month if not longer per batch mixture. Your plants also need to be fed, carbon is the main nutrient they need. However, they will also need Macro and Micro nutrients to stay healthy and grow. I use a liquid fertilizer called Thrive from NilocG. I also buy it in Amazon or you can go to their website directly. As far as the lights you will have to see what your plants need. I would recommend leaving them on for at least eight hours and then turning them off. Plants will produce oxygen during the period of time in which your lights are in through photosynthesis. However, once your lights go off they will consume oxygen and produce carbon dioxide. So for the dark period ( the period of time when your lights are off. I would recommend running one to two air stones with an air pump on a timer. Set your air pump to come on 15 minutes before your lights turn off and run it until the next day at what ever time you decide your lights to come on. I would recommend turning the air pump at least an hour before your lights come on and have your CO2 system come on as your air pump is turning off. The idea with this is so that the concentration of CO2 within your water column is at a higher level before your lights come on and this way your plants will begin producing oxygen through the consumption of carbon dioxide; which is needed by the plants to produced the chlorophyll which they use to carry out photosynthesis. Follow the fertilizer’s recommendation an adjust these requirements to the needs of your tank, the same goes s for the light duration. If your plants still look a little yellow or brown after starting all this increase the duration of lights or cut back depending on what you plants are telling you. Furthermore, remember that lights, carbon dioxide, and fertilizers create by the nature of how they work a delicate balance between all three of them. A balance which will be vividly visible through your plants. Let me know how it works out and if you need any help just reach out and I will gladly help you with anything I can. I will post pictures of the fertilizer, and the CO2 system I use.

DCA0B857-E7BA-4D07-836E-A1F77C6D493F.jpeg
91F394E1-1ADB-43F0-AC3B-6E3EF45329EF.jpeg

CB71997C-949D-47D0-94B8-26243EE7CC88.jpeg
04CE885C-5685-45C1-AD11-1ADCACBBE28D.jpeg
 

Attachments

  • E05428E7-0A41-413D-9E7D-28B10F9B2B5B.jpeg
    E05428E7-0A41-413D-9E7D-28B10F9B2B5B.jpeg
    185.9 KB · Views: 13
Upvote 0

Bentley

Good Evening Bentley,
In a nine gallon tank a small CO2 system would go a long way. As far as this I personally use a DIY kit and it works great for me. I bought my kit on Amazon from a company call ZRDR; it uses a combination of Citric Acid and Baking Soda plus water. I bought the 2 liter bottle. Which on your nine gallon should last you a month if not longer per batch mixture. Your plants also need to be fed, carbon is the main nutrient they need. However, they will also need Macro and Micro nutrients to stay healthy and grow. I use a liquid fertilizer called Thrive from NilocG. I also buy it in Amazon or you can go to their website directly. As far as the lights you will have to see what your plants need. I would recommend leaving them on for at least eight hours and then turning them off. Plants will produce oxygen during the period of time in which your lights are in through photosynthesis. However, once your lights go off they will consume oxygen and produce carbon dioxide. So for the dark period ( the period of time when your lights are off. I would recommend running one to two air stones with an air pump on a timer. Set your air pump to come on 15 minutes before your lights turn off and run it until the next day at what ever time you decide your lights to come on. I would recommend turning the air pump at least an hour before your lights come on and have your CO2 system come on as your air pump is turning off. The idea with this is so that the concentration of CO2 within your water column is at a higher level before your lights come on and this way your plants will begin producing oxygen through the consumption of carbon dioxide; which is needed by the plants to produced the chlorophyll which they use to carry out photosynthesis. Follow the fertilizer’s recommendation an adjust these requirements to the needs of your tank, the same goes s for the light duration. If your plants still look a little yellow or brown after starting all this increase the duration of lights or cut back depending on what you plants are telling you. Furthermore, remember that lights, carbon dioxide, and fertilizers create by the nature of how they work a delicate balance between all three of them. A balance which will be vividly visible through your plants. Let me know how it works out and if you need any help just reach out and I will gladly help you with anything I can. I will post pictures of the fertilizer, and the CO2 system I use.

DCA0B857-E7BA-4D07-836E-A1F77C6D493F.jpeg
91F394E1-1ADB-43F0-AC3B-6E3EF45329EF.jpeg

CB71997C-949D-47D0-94B8-26243EE7CC88.jpeg
04CE885C-5685-45C1-AD11-1ADCACBBE28D.jpeg
Hello BackBlast72,
Thank you so much for the information and the recommendations! I have seen that particular Co2 system on Amazon, so I’m glad to hear that it is working for you. I’ll also look into the fertilizer you recommend. Is it a more complete fertilizer than Flourish? Also what is the ChemiPure Green in the photo? It looks like a filter material.

Beautiful tank!!! Thanks again for the helpful information!
 
Upvote 0

Backblast72

The chemipure green is a specialized type of carbon made specifically for planted aquariums. This type of carbon does not remove the nutrients and minerals your plants needs to thrive. So if you have a planted aquarium and want to use carbon this is the way to go. The bags are lasting me at least four to five months before I have to change them. Your water will be crystal clear.
 
Upvote 0

Similar Aquarium Threads

  • Question
Replies
7
Views
348
smee82
Replies
9
Views
325
Nickguy5467
  • Question
Replies
3
Views
167
Chanyi
Replies
3
Views
159
CoconutTheBetta
  • Question
Replies
1
Views
94
Mudminnow

New Plant Threads

Latest Aquarium Threads

Top Bottom