Cleaning Tanks and Equipment after Dead Fish

  • Thread starter Goose61
  • Start date
  • Thread starter
  • #1

Goose61

New Member
Member
Messages
22
I have a number of nets and tanks that I used to quarantine a Betta who recently passed from Dropsy, and wondering as to the best technique(s) to sterilize them for reuse. I know that there are some commercial products available, as well as old standbys such as bleach, or food safe alcohols such as ethanol (Everclear) diluted to appx. 70%.

Or, in the case of the nets, should they just be disposed of due to their relatively low expense?
 
  • #2

AquaticQueen

Well Known
Member
Messages
3,191
Sorry about you betta.
You could get rid of the nets if you really don't want to sterilize them but you might as well if you are sterilizing everything else.
I would do a 15 minute bleach dip in case he had some fungas or ich that you didn't notice in the past. 1 part bleach to every 10 parts water. Give everything a rinse afterwards.
I probably wouldn't sterilize the tank(s) with bleach. If fish are living in there for prolonged periods of time, any bleach residue from the tank walls may mix with the water and harm your fish.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #3

Goose61

New Member
Member
Messages
22
Thanks.

How about Marimo balls? There were Marimo balls in my fish's primary tank before he died, and I was worried as to the potential spread of any residual disease pathogens if they were to be reused again (and if so, how does one go about sterilizing Marimo balls).
 
  • #4

MacZ

Fishlore VIP
Member
Messages
4,127
Without a fish to live on/in most pathogens die off within latest 2 weeks. Unless you had fish tuberculosis (which is rare!) don't worry. Just use the chance for some rescaping and cleaning the corners now that there is no fish present in the tank. Do some big waterchanges and gravel vac thoroughly. For the nets if you think it's necessary just pour hot (just below boiling) water in a containier, put the nets in and let them soak (except they are of cheap plactic, in which cse 70°C are enough. Salt the water if you like, rinse them afterwards, done.

Also you don't have to disinfect any plants like the mossballs.
 
  • #5

AvalancheDave

Well Known
Member
Messages
2,573
Most pathogens are natural residents of fish and water. Fish are big sources of food and shelter for bacteria among other things.

New fish would just bring pathogens with them even if you were able to sterilize everything,

I would recommend lowering stress (keep organic waste from building up, etc.) and improving diagnosis and treatment.
 
  • #6

Sanderguy777

Well Known
Member
Messages
1,010
AquaticQueen said:
Sorry about you betta.
You could get rid of the nets if you really don't want to sterilize them but you might as well if you are sterilizing everything else.
I would do a 15 minute bleach dip in case he had some fungas or ich that you didn't notice in the past. 1 part bleach to every 10 parts water. Give everything a rinse afterwards.
I probably wouldn't sterilize the tank(s) with bleach. If fish are living in there for prolonged periods of time, any bleach residue from the tank walls may mix with the water and harm your fish.
I thought bleach used chlorine as its active ingredient, and that Prime, Safe, etc neutralized chlorine.
Maybe I'm mistaken, and obviously we want to clean it out more than just neutralize it, but im just curious
 
  • #7

MacZ

Fishlore VIP
Member
Messages
4,127
Sanderguy777 said:
I thought bleach used chlorine as its active ingredient, and that Prime, Safe, etc neutralized chlorine.
Maybe I'm mistaken, and obviously we want to clean it out more than just neutralize it, but im just curious
Chlorine is added to tap water as a disinfectant. Bleach is concentrated chlorine and can be used for that purpose extremely diluted and has to be thoroughly rinsed afterwards. In my opinion it's overkill and environmentally a really stupid idea, as just a little of the stuff is enough to ruin gallons and gallons of drinking water.
 
Top Bottom