Cichlids - tell me why?

SpecialPatrolGroup

Hi all. I know I'm posting a lot but I just love this hobby of mine and am so keen to keep learning. I don't want to be one of *those* members constantly posting though ... please feel free to ignore me

So, about cichlids. From what I understand they can be very aggressive. I'm curious as to why one would want to keep aggressive fish. What do you do if they attack each other? Or is it manageable if you have it all set up in a certain way?

I've read that they have great personalities but to be honest, I think they would be stressful fish to keep, I get quite distressed if any of mine are aggressive to one another and I only have 'beginner' fish!

I'd love to hear more from those who have cichlids about your reasons for choosing them
 

jkkgron2

What cichlids are you interested in?

I’ve never kept some of the more aggressive cichlids, but I have kept dwarf cichlids and tanganyikan shell dwelling cichlids and I’ve found them to be aggressive, but not to the point where it’s not manageable.

For most cichlids like my shell dwellers it depends on the individual fish. Usually, provided there’s enough space and caves, there’s only a small amount of fighting after territory and hierarchy has been established. Once in a while though there’s a bully that just won’t stop fighting with the other fish. That’s usually when problems start occurring. IME removing the bully and/or adding more caves will help.
 
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Batmantheanglefish

I have rams, angelfish, and a flowerhorn. They are all cichlids. The rams and angels are usually not aggressive and I’ve kept them with other tropical fish with zero problems in a well planted tank with lots of hiding spots. The flowerhorn on the other hand can’t be kept with any fish, decor, and plants. He will literally destroy anything in the tank. He even pushes the sand around! His personality makes up for it though he always is very social and almost is asking to be pet during water changes!
 
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Ouse

Aggression can be managed depending on the setup and stocking density. You want places for individual cichlids to make territories and they will fight for their space.
 
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SpecialPatrolGroup

I have rams, angelfish, and a flowerhorn. They are all cichlids. The rams and angels are usually not aggressive and I’ve kept them with other tropical fish with zero problems in a well planted tank with lots of hiding spots. The flowerhorn on the other hand can’t be kept with any fish, decor, and plants. He will literally destroy anything in the tank. He even pushes the sand around! His personality makes up for it though he always is very social and almost is asking to be pet during water changes!

Really? How amazing! So what's the tank like - surely not just empty! Do you have a photo? I'd love to see him.
What cichlids are you interested in?

I’ve never kept some of the more aggressive cichlids, but I have kept dwarf cichlids and tanganyikan shell dwelling cichlids and I’ve found them to be aggressive, but not to the point where it’s not manageable.

For most cichlids like my shell dwellers it depends on the individual fish. Usually, provided there’s enough space and caves, there’s only a small amount of fighting after territory and hierarchy has been established. Once in a while though there’s a bully that just won’t stop fighting with the other fish. That’s usually when problems start occurring. IME removing the bully and/or adding more caves will help.


It's probably very clichèd but I would love an angelfish. Actually I would like more than one but I only want female fish and I read that angelfish are virtually impossible to sex until they're ready to spawn. My new tank is almost as tall as it is long so I am ready to try an angelfish.

I'm also interested in kribensis.

Tank mates will be 3 x female mollies, 2 x female platys, 5 x albino cories and either Harlequin rasboras or some kind of tetra. I'm quite keen on the kerri tetra. Possibly I'll also have three or four female honey gouramis. I'm not sure yet.
 
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Batmantheanglefish

Well....it’s actually empty besides sand lol here’s a pic. I tried rocks and that didn’t go too well he rammed himself into them a bunch so I took them out. He makes a mess with sand he pushes it all to one side so I have to redo it everyday. Ignore the algae I cleaned it already.
 

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Dechi

Mbunas are among the most aggressive cichlids. I have to admit I regretted getting them at first. But since I had put so much effort (and money) into this project, I had to keep going.

Fast forward 4 months later I really do like my fish. They are a special bunch and you need to take special precautions so they don’t kill each other but they grow on you. They exhibit many interesting behaviors that I had never seen in my numerous other tank set-ups.
 
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veggieshark

Everybody enjoy different things and have different reasons to keep something. Aggressiveness turns you off if you like a peaceful community. For some, that aggressiveness is enjoyable to watch. Sometimes it is the challenge of keeping something that difficult that makes it attractive. Curbing the aggression so you can keep everything you want together is not always the goal, though it might be.

I do enjoy community tanks by the way, and stay away from fish that a) get larger than 6" and b) so aggressive/predatory that it can't be kept together with anything else. Still, there are quite a few options to work with.
 
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SpecialPatrolGroup

Well....it’s actually empty besides sand lol here’s a pic. I tried rocks and that didn’t go too well he rammed himself into them a bunch so I took them out. He makes a mess with sand he pushes it all to one side so I have to redo it everyday. Ignore the algae I cleaned it already.

Oh he's naughty! Are all flowerhorns like him or did you just get lucky? :-D

He's a cool-looking fish, I wonder why he behaves like that?
 
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jkkgron2

It's probably very clichèd but I would love an angelfish. Actually I would like more than one but I only want female fish and I read that angelfish are virtually impossible to sex until they're ready to spawn. My new tank is almost as tall as it is long so I am ready to try an angelfish.

I'm also interested in kribensis.

Tank mates will be 3 x female mollies, 2 x female platys, 5 x albino cories and either Harlequin rasboras or some kind of tetra. I'm quite keen on the kerri tetra. Possibly I'll also have three or four female honey gouramis. I'm not sure yet.
What’s the tank size? I have both angelfish and kribensis, and they don’t fight each other at all. So if you want to and the tank is big enough you probably could keep both. They’re also with albino corys and they have been kept with tetras and platys without issues.
 
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PurpleReign19

Hi all. I know I'm posting a lot but I just love this hobby of mine and am so keen to keep learning. I don't want to be one of *those* members constantly posting though ... please feel free to ignore me

So, about cichlids. From what I understand they can be very aggressive. I'm curious as to why one would want to keep aggressive fish. What do you do if they attack each other? Or is it manageable if you have it all set up in a certain way?

I've read that they have great personalities but to be honest, I think they would be stressful fish to keep, I get quite distressed if any of mine are aggressive to one another and I only have 'beginner' fish!

I'd love to hear more from those who have cichlids about your reasons for choosing them
Cichlids can be very cool looking and are known to have great personalities. Its usually best to tru and put them with fish they would coexist in the wild with to reduce aggression. Lots of sightbreaks too will help.
 
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St3v3

Hi all. I know I'm posting a lot but I just love this hobby of mine and am so keen to keep learning. I don't want to be one of *those* members constantly posting though ... please feel free to ignore me

So, about cichlids. From what I understand they can be very aggressive. I'm curious as to why one would want to keep aggressive fish. What do you do if they attack each other? Or is it manageable if you have it all set up in a certain way?

I've read that they have great personalities but to be honest, I think they would be stressful fish to keep, I get quite distressed if any of mine are aggressive to one another and I only have 'beginner' fish!

I'd love to hear more from those who have cichlids about your reasons for choosing them
One of the main things that I like most about cichlids is they are very human interactive. When you arrive at a tank the tetras won't really care to see you.Cichlids on the other hand will swim up to the glass to greet you.The category of cichlids is very diverse where species of one genus or family may be completely different from those of another genus. Some cichlids are aggressive yet there is plenty of species that aren't overly aggressive.Another attraction to cichlids is some have very unique coloration and others may have much more elaborate patterns of color.
 
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Batmantheanglefish

I have no idea I think he’s just Weird like that. I think all flowerhorns are kinda the same just some will tolerate decor others won’t. Mine definitely won’t lol. Somehow there is a little mystery snail in there that he hasn’t bothered yet!
 
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SpecialPatrolGroup

What’s the tank size? I have both angelfish and kribensis, and they don’t fight each other at all. So if you want to and the tank is big enough you probably could keep both. They’re also with albino corys and they have been kept with tetras and platys without issues.

Tank size only 30 gal but it's quite tall.
 
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Fae

Really? How amazing! So what's the tank like - surely not just empty! Do you have a photo? I'd love to see him.



It's probably very clichèd but I would love an angelfish. Actually I would like more than one but I only want female fish and I read that angelfish are virtually impossible to sex until they're ready to spawn. My new tank is almost as tall as it is long so I am ready to try an angelfish.

I'm also interested in kribensis.

Tank mates will be 3 x female mollies, 2 x female platys, 5 x albino cories and either Harlequin rasboras or some kind of tetra. I'm quite keen on the kerri tetra. Possibly I'll also have three or four female honey gouramis. I'm not sure yet.

I wouldn't do the honey gouramis in there, they are very peaceful fish and don't do well when they have to fight for their food/space. They are also very small compared to angelfish, but big enough to become targets
 
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MacZ

Cichlids are a very diverse group, with over 1700 described species and I guess 500-1000 more, spread across 3 continents and dozens of different biotopes. Sizes range from a few cm to almost a meter. I have kept at least 60 different species from 2 different continents, mostly from East Africa, but also from West and Central Africa and from South America.

Most cichlids will only be aggressive within their species and the range can be from displaying and chasing to outright killing conspecifics that are not willing to spawn. Speaking of spawn, if ever most cichlids only become aggressive to other species when breeding.
Aggression can never be prevented completely, but it is often not the reason people want to keep them. If you look and listen you might notice most people first fall in love with their colours and shapes and are bitterly disappointed, sometimes even traumatized, when the fish show aggression. Most often this comes from bad choice of tank mates, wrong combination of species and sexes, too little structure and hiding spaces or a too small tank. Most dwarf cichlids for example should not be combined with other bottom dwellers.

So to keep cichlids in a harmonious setup, research and providing the best possible conditions is key. Community tanks, even biotope communities, can be the worst setup to keep cichlids in.

Many species should be kept in species and biotope tanks.

Tank mates will be 3 x female mollies, 2 x female platys, 5 x albino cories and either Harlequin rasboras or some kind of tetra. I'm quite keen on the kerri tetra. Possibly I'll also have three or four female honey gouramis. I'm not sure yet.

You want a peaceful tank and want to put in livebearers and tetras. Doesn't add up.

I would drop the livebearers completely. They need completely different water parameters to the rest and tend to stress other fish in the tank a lot. Tetras on the other hand are bickering and fighting among each other all the time.
Possibly a good combination would be gourami (1m/2-3f) on top, rasboras or danios (10 or more) to the middle and dwarf loaches (6-10 depending on the species) on the ground. That's a combination close to what you would find in the wild, still has movement and nice colours and if any aggression it's within a species.
Generally better keep appropriate numbers of fewer species instead of a wild mix of more in insufficient numbers, which stresses the fish a lot.

Concerning the gourami, make sure they have plenty of cover in the surface region by floating plants, high growing stem plants, vallisneria and/or twigs hanging into the water from above.
 
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RayClem

I think you may find this story interesting. Years ago when I lived in an apartment I had a 29 gallon community tank. One of the fish in that tank was a Jack Dempsey cichlid. They really need a much larger tank. Anyway, the Jack Dempsey (as you might expect from the name) could get rather aggressive. However, he never bullied the smaller fish in the tank. He was the "king of the tank". He was fun to watch and interact with.

One day, while at a pet store, I spotted a snakehead. They are now banned in the USA because they can be invasive, but they weren't back in the 70s. The store manager warned me that snakeheads were highly aggressive, but I figured since I had the Jack Dempsey in the tank that things would work out.

As soon as I placed the snakehead in the tank, it began to chase after all the fish in the tank with the exception of the Jack Dempsey. A hour or so later, I saw the Jack Dempsey swimming around with the jaws of the snakehead protroding from his mouth. He had come up behind the snakehead and swallowed everything with the exception of the business end which contained razor sharp teeth. Thus, the lifespan of the snakehead was quite short short. I carefully extracted the remains of the snakehead from the Jack Dempseys mouth. Things went right back to the peaceful balance that had existed before I foolishly added the snakehead (lesson learned). Of course, I cannot read the mind of a fish, but I surmise that the Jack Dempsey considered this to be his tank. He ruled over the tank and protected his "subjects". He was not about to let a bully harass the fish under his protection.

If you have a large enough tank, cichlids make wonderful pets. You just need to make sure you do not have species that will fight constantly with each other.
 
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chromedome52

Everyone keeps calling Cichlids "aggressive". They are not actually aggressive, they are territorial. This is much of the secret to figuring out how to keep them. Give them enough room, and most Cichlids, even those with bad reputations, are nowhere near as violent as expected. There are a very few that seem to be genuinely aggressive, and will go out of their way to attack another fish, but even these calm down when given sufficient space.

The catch is, most aquaria aren't big enough to give them their space. So we come up with ways to make it seem that they have their space while leaving space for other fish. Plants, rocks, and other "decorations" break up the line of sight, so they cannot see potential intruders at a reasonable distance. Some species, such as Angels, are far less territorial than others, and learn to tolerate such intrusions. Small species, such as Apistogramma, are often more protective than large species, but they defend a smaller territory.

One of the most confusing things for novice aquarists is that they can buy a bunch of young, juvenile Cichlids and these fish get along in the tank for months. Then suddenly, one day, "out of the blue", they start ripping on one another. That's called reaching maturity. Once they "hit puberty", so to speak, the urge to reproduce starts to control their lives, and that means they have to establish territories. For most species this is strictly the males, but there are a few where females can get impatient, as well.

There are books on how to decorate Cichlid tanks specifically. I haven't read any of them, as I tend to trust my instincts. I have been wrong on occasion. That's how we learn.

As to why we keep them: many are beautiful, they tend to behave more intelligently than your community type fish, and most protect their young. It is the observation of how the different species approach this task that can be quite fascinating. It is the main reason for their territoriality.
 
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SpecialPatrolGroup

Cichlids are a very diverse group, with over 1700 described species and I guess 500-1000 more, spread across 3 continents and dozens of different biotopes. Sizes range from a few cm to almost a meter. I have kept at least 60 different species from 2 different continents, mostly from East Africa, but also from West and Central Africa and from South America.

Most cichlids will only be aggressive within their species and the range can be from displaying and chasing to outright killing conspecifics that are not willing to spawn. Speaking of spawn, if ever most cichlids only become aggressive to other species when breeding.
Aggression can never be prevented completely, but it is often not the reason people want to keep them. If you look and listen you might notice most people first fall in love with their colours and shapes and are bitterly disappointed, sometimes even traumatized, when the fish show aggression. Most often this comes from bad choice of tank mates, wrong combination of species and sexes, too little structure and hiding spaces or a too small tank. Most dwarf cichlids for example should not be combined with other bottom dwellers.

So to keep cichlids in a harmonious setup, research and providing the best possible conditions is key. Community tanks, even biotope communities, can be the worst setup to keep cichlids in.

Many species should be kept in species and biotope tanks.



Sorry, this makes me laugh. You want a peaceful tank and want to put in livebearers and tetras. Doesn't add up.

I would drop the livebearers completely. They need completely different water parameters to the rest and tend to stress other fish in the tank a lot. Tetras on the other hand are bickering and fighting among each other all the time.
Possibly a good combination would be gourami (1m/2-3f) on top, rasboras or danios (10 or more) to the middle and dwarf loaches (6-10 depending on the species) on the ground. That's a combination close to what you would find in the wild, still has movement and nice colours and if any aggression it's within a species.
Generally better keep appropriate numbers of fewer species instead of a wild mix of more in insufficient numbers, which stresses the fish a lot.

Concerning the gourami, make sure they have plenty of cover in the surface region by floating plants, high growing stem plants, vallisneria and/or twigs hanging into the water from above.

Well, see, the thing about my original post was to, what was it ... "look and listen"? I'm new, and I'm learning.

It's a shame you feel you have to laugh at my post and my inexperience. All of the fish I listed have been living together beautifully in my extremely peaceful community tank for months. I have never seen an iota of bickering amongst my tetras, my mollies all hang together like they've been besties since fry-hood, they don't bother the others at all. My platy just cruises around, and my guppy unexpectedly had 26 fry who have had a ball in the tank, survived like champions and it's been a joy to watch them grow. The first lot of fry she had we did expect, and separated her in time. They're thriving in another tank. The two cories I have in there are loving life.

I got a bigger tank so they'd have more room, not because the combination isn't working.

Thanks for your detailed post, which didn't answer my questions but did make me feel embarrassed.

I do thank you for the information regarding the gouramis - I had planned to leave the tetras where they are now and only move the livebearers to the new tank. I had wanted rasboras for the schooling fish in that tank.

I think I'm actually going to put all of the guppies into a purpose-built pond. We have a very temperate climate in Western Australia and I have an already-cycled, well-planted pond in our courtyard, which is undercover and sheltered. Heating it will be easy.

I have had a lot of success (so far) with my tanks and my goldfish pond and I'm sure that much of that has probably been luck, but I am also very diligent with my tanks and, bearing in mind that I am still a novice, I am making sure I know as much as I can before adding any new species to the mix.

Everyone keeps calling Cichlids "aggressive". They are not actually aggressive, they are territorial. This is much of the secret to figuring out how to keep them. Give them enough room, and most Cichlids, even those with bad reputations, are nowhere near as violent as expected. There are a very few that seem to be genuinely aggressive, and will go out of their way to attack another fish, but even these calm down when given sufficient space.

The catch is, most aquaria aren't big enough to give them their space. So we come up with ways to make it seem that they have their space while leaving space for other fish. Plants, rocks, and other "decorations" break up the line of sight, so they cannot see potential intruders at a reasonable distance. Some species, such as Angels, are far less territorial than others, and learn to tolerate such intrusions. Small species, such as Apistogramma, are often more protective than large species, but they defend a smaller territory.

One of the most confusing things for novice aquarists is that they can buy a bunch of young, juvenile Cichlids and these fish get along in the tank for months. Then suddenly, one day, "out of the blue", they start ripping on one another. That's called reaching maturity. Once they "hit puberty", so to speak, the urge to reproduce starts to control their lives, and that means they have to establish territories. For most species this is strictly the males, but there are a few where females can get impatient, as well.

There are books on how to decorate Cichlid tanks specifically. I haven't read any of them, as I tend to trust my instincts. I have been wrong on occasion. That's how we learn.

As to why we keep them: many are beautiful, they tend to behave more intelligently than your community type fish, and most protect their young. It is the observation of how the different species approach this task that can be quite fascinating. It is the main reason for their territoriality.

Thank you!! Amazing.
 
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MacZ

Well, see, the thing about my original post was to, what was it ... "look and listen"? I'm new, and I'm learning.

It's a shame you feel you have to laugh at my post and my inexperience. All of the fish I listed have been living together beautifully in my extremely peaceful community tank for months. I have never seen an iota of bickering amongst my tetras, my mollies all hang together like they've been besties since fry-hood, they don't bother the others at all. My platy just cruises around, and my guppy unexpectedly had 26 fry who have had a ball in the tank, survived like champions and it's been a joy to watch them grow. The first lot of fry she had we did expect, and separated her in time. They're thriving in another tank. The two cories I have in there are loving life.

I got a bigger tank so they'd have more room, not because the combination isn't working.

Thanks for your detailed post, which didn't answer my questions but did make me feel embarrassed.

I do thank you for the information regarding the gouramis - I had planned to leave the tetras where they are now and only move the livebearers to the new tank. I had wanted rasboras for the schooling fish in that tank.

I think I'm actually going to put all of the guppies into a purpose-built pond. We have a very temperate climate in Western Australia and I have an already-cycled, well-planted pond in our courtyard, which is undercover and sheltered. Heating it will be easy.

I have had a lot of success (so far) with my tanks and my goldfish pond and I'm sure that much of that has probably been luck, but I am also very diligent with my tanks and, bearing in mind that I am still a novice, I am making sure I know as much as I can before adding any new species to the mix.



Thank you!! Amazing.

I'm sorry if my post came across that hostile. I only laughed at one thing and only that thing, and that was livebearers and tetras and "peaceful". Everything else was not to make fun of you but to put out information you can possibly use and suggestions that may help.
Even if I react openly amused, it's rarely in mean spirit.
 
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RayClem

I'm sorry if my post came across that hostile. I only laughed at one thing and only that thing, and that was livebearers and tetras and "peaceful". Everything else was not to make fun of you but to put out information you can possibly use and suggestions that may help.
Even if I react openly amused, it's rarely in mean spirit.


I have read a lot of your posts Mac and I have never though you came across as mean spirited. I do not believe that was your intention this time either.

One of the reasons I posted my story about the Jack Dempsey and snakehead is that during our fishkeeping journeys, nearly all of us do things that are stupid. My purchase of the snakehead certainly qualified. However, I learned a valuable lesson in the process.

I do have a combination of livebearers and tetras in my tanks. I do not have mollies, but I do have platys and guppies along with Serpae tetra and bleeding heart tetras. I keep the pH around 7.5 which is a suitable compromise for both. I know it would be better to have separate tanks for each type of fish, but I like the variety of color, shape and movement.
 
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BigBeardDaHuZi

I love cichlids because they generally seem to be a step up in intelligence. Some of them even get pet-like, (usually the South or Central American ones), but most of the cichlids I have kept seem more aware of their surroundings. As they are not usually a schooling fish, you tend to get more individualistic behaviors too.
Several of the fish in my tank will glass surf occasionally, but there are two or three that tend to glass surf a lot. They seem to like it (although, it is so subjective, it is hard to really know). The tank boss is gliding around the tank, making sure that everyone knows he's the boss. A blue dolphin (C. Moori) that I recently added, is working himself up the heirarchy chain of the tank. The "fighting" is all very mild, but you can see them sorting themselves out. There are three baby C. Geertsi in the tank. Their behavior is very different than all of the other juveniles in the tank. They are pretty cute and fun to watch. It is also exciting to see what they will look like some day, as cichlids tend to color up with age. All of my fish are getting more colorful by the day, which is really cool.

Also, cichlids are just gorgeous.

Sorry, kindof a rambling answer, but these are some of the reasons I love cichlids.
 
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pagoda

I have Gold and Blue Rams and a Red Throat Apisto...not all in the same aquarium obviously but spread over 5 aquariums...I can honestly say that I have not seen serious behavioural issues with any of them.

Yes we do have the occasional squabbling over food or if one is having a bad day he or she lets everyone else know about it. On the whole they are endearing, very interactive little fish. They greet you in the morning....OK cos the pink lights go on which means "FOOOOOOOODDDDDDDDDD!!" but they really do interact alot with their humans....mine often sit beside the glass mouthing and fin swishing as if putting the world to rights :)

Despite what you might read, they are not that demanding to care for, just basic good husbandry will keep them happy and healthy. Very intelligent fish, easy to train to the lighting......to explain that.....mornings at 0500 the lighting comes on blue, that gets everyone awake, about an hour later I switch to purple and then everyone is huddled under the feed hatches, once fed the light is changed to low intensity white until around 1430-1500 then its back to purple and you can see the activity start to drop down, an hour later it goes to blue and everyone finds their spot for the night, lights right off an hour later and thats it til morning. All lighting is extremely low intensity (cloudy day not bright sunlight) so no algae issues and the fish are relaxed and not startled.

Any fish can be trained but the Cichlid seems alot more capable and willing to be trained.....mine also keep the Cories in check sometimes, they don't bully them, just a stare will do which is met by a moody tail swish from the Cory and the Ram looks at me as if to say "I give up.....what can I do...they never listen to me!" :D
 
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Dechi

Several of the fish in my tank will glass surf occasionally, but there are two or three that tend to glass surf a lot. They seem to like it (although, it is so subjective, it is hard to really know).

It’s funny how two people interpret the same behavior differently. I have some fish that occasionally do glass surfing and I always see it as them being stressed, like they’re looking for a way out of the tank. I’m questioning myself if I should rehome them or not.

All lighting is extremely low intensity (cloudy day not bright sunlight) so no algae issues and the fish are relaxed and not startled.

I’m doing the opposite. I’m purposely trying to grow algae for the fish to forage on. It is working but they like it so much it can’t really grow, it gets eaten before it has a chance to. Every night before going to bed, when the lights are blue, they will nibble on the algae.
 
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TClare

I have read a lot of your posts Mac and I have never though you came across as mean spirited. I do not believe that was your intention this time either.

One of the reasons I posted my story about the Jack Dempsey and snakehead is that during our fishkeeping journeys, nearly all of us do things that are stupid. My purchase of the snakehead certainly qualified. However, I learned a valuable lesson in the process.

I do have a combination of livebearers and tetras in my tanks. I do not have mollies, but I do have platys and guppies along with Serpae tetra and bleeding heart tetras. I keep the pH around 7.5 which is a suitable compromise for both. I know it would be better to have separate tanks for each type of fish, but I like the variety of color, shape and movement.
I was also very surprised that the OP would be offended by any of these posts that were all interesting and helpful I thought.
 
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jmaldo

I have to admit when I first started I did not care for Cichlids. I really have no idea why but...
Over time my favorite are Bolivian Rams. I first noticed their stop start swimming. Then their colors, especially in their breeding dress. And of course raising their spawns. I liken them to puppies, so personable, always come to "Greet" me when I approach the tank. I know they have been conditioned and are just looking for food, but...
I have kept Electric Blue Acara my second favorite along with Angels, Discus, an assortment of GBR, Gold, Dark, Hybrid rams and now keeping Africans. Have to admit the colors are spectacular.
The journey continues....
 
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Biz

I never gave fish a single thought, until I inherited a yellow lab cichlid at work. I was the junior person and given the reaponsibility of a neglected 10 gallon that was left behind by an employee who transferred. It was covered in algae and had one yellow fish, some of the senior employees told me the yellow fish had killed some tankmates. I did some research and found out it was a cichlid and put it in a much larger tank and set the tank up nicely. The tank became the pride of the office, and the fish had so much personality. He kept everyone entertained and really came alive for anyone that visited my desk. That fish made me fall in love with fishkeeping, I just know I will end up with another cichlid, even though I'm trying the community tanks currently. Cichlids are truly pets.
 
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Amyjw

Hi all. I know I'm posting a lot but I just love this hobby of mine and am so keen to keep learning. I don't want to be one of *those* members constantly posting though ... please feel free to ignore me

So, about cichlids. From what I understand they can be very aggressive. I'm curious as to why one would want to keep aggressive fish. What do you do if they attack each other? Or is it manageable if you have it all set up in a certain way?

I've read that they have great personalities but to be honest, I think they would be stressful fish to keep, I get quite distressed if any of mine are aggressive to one another and I only have 'beginner' fish!

I'd love to hear more from those who have cichlids about your reasons for choosing them
Personally I love cichlids. For one they are so interesting, beautiful, highly intelligent and unique. From my experience with my cichlids, they get along together very well and always have. I only have semi aggressive/ agressive tanks. I have terrible luck with any community tanks I have ever tried. I do read alot of our forum members saying how overly aggressive some of their cichlids are but I've never had an issue (knock on wood). Research everything you can before pulling the trigger tho
 
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