Cichlid swim bladder issue?

Hemikyle

Tank
What is the water volume of the tank? 125 Gallons
How long has the tank been running? 1 year +
Does it have a filter? 2 HOB and 1 Cannister
Does it have a heater? 2 Heaters
What is the water temperature? 79°F
What is the entire stocking of this tank? (Please list all fish and inverts.)
Yellow Lab Mbunas
White Mouth Mdokas
Parrot Cichlids
Convict Cichlids
Peacock Cichlids
Tropheus Duboisi
Blue Polar Cichlid
Hap Cichlids
Frontosa Cichlid
Cuckoo Catfish

Maintenance
How often do you change the water? Every week.
How much of the water do you change? Roughly 30% - 50%.
What do you use to treat your water? Prime
Do you vacuum the substrate or just the water? Vacuum substrate.

*Parameters - Very Important
Did you cycle your tank before adding fish? Yes.
What do you use to test the water? API Test Kit
What are your parameters? We need to know the exact numbers, not just “fine” or “safe”.
Ammonia: 0 -.25ppm
Nitrite: 0ppm
Nitrate: 0ppm
pH: 7.8

Feeding
How often do you feed your fish? Once everyday.
How much do you feed your fish? As much as they can eat within 2 minutes.
What brand of food do you feed your fish? Omega One.
Do you feed frozen? Yes
Do you feed freeze-dried foods? Yes

Illness & Symptoms
How long have you had this fish? 11 months
How long ago did you first notice these symptoms? 2 weeks ago.
In a few words, can you explain the symptoms? Tends to float up to top of tank if not swimming around or is in motion.
Have you started any treatment for the illness? Yes epsom salt bath, and peas.
Was your fish physically ill or injured upon purchase? No.
How has its behavior and appearance changed, if at all? Appearance has not changed but behavior has as far as not being able to swim in the water instead rises to the top of the tank if not swimming around.

Explain your emergency situation in detail. (Please give a clear explanation of what is going on, include details from the beginning of the illness leading up to now)
The peacock cichlid tends to float at the top of the tank when not in motion and can't seem to stay at the bottom or in the middle of the tank. Seems to possibly be a swim bladder issue but unsure. Any suggestions, thoughts, or ideas on treatments would greatly help out the cichlid and be appreciated! Thanks.
 

Attachments

  • 20210712_144134.jpg
    20210712_144134.jpg
    169.8 KB · Views: 13
  • 20210712_144035.jpg
    20210712_144035.jpg
    211.2 KB · Views: 12
  • 20210712_144001.jpg
    20210712_144001.jpg
    158.7 KB · Views: 13
  • 20210712_143953.jpg
    20210712_143953.jpg
    193.5 KB · Views: 12
  • 20210712_143911.jpg
    20210712_143911.jpg
    210 KB · Views: 13
  • 20210712_143845.jpg
    20210712_143845.jpg
    151.2 KB · Views: 13
  • 20210712_142310.jpg
    20210712_142310.jpg
    241.8 KB · Views: 14
  • 20210712_142305.jpg
    20210712_142305.jpg
    182.2 KB · Views: 14
  • 20210712_142255.jpg
    20210712_142255.jpg
    192.9 KB · Views: 15
  • 20210712_142254.jpg
    20210712_142254.jpg
    203.9 KB · Views: 15

MacZ

That fish is very likely one of the whipping boys of the tank and very low in the pecking order. The surface in the corners is often the last place where they can hide away. That's a common thing in tanks with a stocking like yours. Often infections and parasites take advantage of the stressed animal and can end them quite quickly.

You are aware that peas are more of an urban legend and don't work on carnivores like Aulonocara?
Epsom salt baths may help with dropsy, reducing the swelling using the osmotic pressure, but the underlying beginning kidney failure is not going to go away with that.

Either take it out and rehome it or put it in a hospital tank and nurse it back to health. Either way, when a fish is at that stage you often have little to no chance to reintegrate it to the tank or to bring it back from that state without very aggressive meds, that often rather speed up the inevitable, than help. Sometimes they only help for a while until the fish finally succumbs to the infection anyways.
 
Upvote 0

A201

MacZ summed up the situation very well. I agree, the pictured OB Peacock is likely the lowest Cichlid in the hierarchy. As long as he is eating & can endure the beating, it might be a good idea to allow him to stay in the tank
Sometimes when the weakest cichlid is removed, the dominant Cichlids shift their aggression towards the Cichlid that had been second from the bottom in the hierarchy. That fish becomes the next whipping boy.
Annoying aggression is just a reality of keeping Cichlids, especially African Cichlids.
 
Upvote 0

Hemikyle

Would introducing more female cichlids over time to my tank lessen the aggression with all my male cichlids?
 
Upvote 0

MacZ

No, that would be rather like fanning the flames.
 
Upvote 0

Hemikyle

So it's pretty much inevitable is what your saying for the cichlids and its just how it is?
 
Upvote 0

A201

Virtually all Cichlids are territorial & will display aggression to assert dominance or to protect their nest.
Adding females to your African tank will guarantee excessive digging and most of your fish being bannished to one side of the tank, while a mated pair, guarding their nest, will dominate the other side.
 
Upvote 0

MacZ

Virtually all Cichlids are territorial & will display aggression to assert dominance or to protect their nest.
Adding females to your African tank will guarantee excessive digging and most of your fish being bannished to one side of the tank, while a mated pair, guarding their nest, will dominate the other side.

Looking at the species list, parrots and convicts will do this, the Malawis and Tanganyikans will just go nuts from any female hormons. And seeing the stocking density in the pictures I wouldn't be surprised if there are already females in the mix.

So it's pretty much inevitable is what your saying for the cichlids and its just how it is?

Largely. Only handpicked stocking (species, sexes, individual temperaments, density) and a good structure of rocks can minimize this.
 
Upvote 0

Hemikyle

Looking at the species list, parrots and convicts will do this, the Malawis and Tanganyikans will just go nuts from any female hormons. And seeing the stocking density in the pictures I wouldn't be surprised if there are already females in the mix.



Largely. Only handpicked stocking (species, sexes, individual temperaments, density) and a good structure of rocks can minimize this.
Gotcha looks like I'll be getting more rocks!! I'll send a picture and see if maybe what I have is enough or not, get some opinions.
 
Upvote 0

MacZ

Yeah, post a picture and try a full, detailed stocking list. With that info we can help you optimize it.
 
Upvote 0

Hemikyle

Here's what my tank looks like you think adding more rocks would help the situation? More taller decor like in the middle?
 

Attachments

  • 20210801_122320.jpg
    20210801_122320.jpg
    126.9 KB · Views: 8
  • 20210801_122313.jpg
    20210801_122313.jpg
    127.1 KB · Views: 8
  • 20210801_122232.jpg
    20210801_122232.jpg
    164.8 KB · Views: 8
  • 20210801_122220.jpg
    20210801_122220.jpg
    174.5 KB · Views: 8
Upvote 0

Similar Aquarium Threads

  • Question
Replies
1
Views
79
Initiate
Replies
3
Views
75
Rosemoss
Replies
3
Views
76
HungriestPuffer
Replies
3
Views
141
Slapp
Replies
7
Views
150
Jubie101

Latest Aquarium Threads

Top Bottom