Chlorine Present After Using Seachem Prime???

TheShapeofGuillermo
  • #1
Ok y’all... I listened and got the Seachem Prime. Ammonia levels in my new TopFin 3.5 gallon are at 0 as they should be, but I still can’t get a clear reading on Nitrate levels, and Nitrite is at 1.0 according to my Tetra Easy Strips (I haven’t tried Nitrite readings on my API Master test yet, not have I been able to get an accurate Nitrate reading with the liquid kit).

However, there’s a big problem with that Seachem. Based on stellar reviews by the betta community I got some for my new Female Half Moon betta, BUT guess what’s still showing up on the tests .__. Chlorine is showing up in dangerous levels in my tank. What gives? I thought Seachem was the answer to my prayers but it seems like it’s not worth what I paid for if chlorine is still showing up... I went back to using my old TopFin water dechlorinator, but why is Chlorine still showing up with prime? I let my water sit for 15 minutes before adding beneficial bacteria supplement and do partial 30% water changes every day.

Could it be other items in the tank causing the spike? I have a fairly heavy planted tank with three Anubias Nana, an Asian Fern, and one amazon sword. My fish also has some big rock decorations, a cichlid house, and the Anubias Nana and Asian Fern are glued onto the decorations with Seachem Flourish Glue. Let me know if you all have any theories on why my chlorine levels are still high.
 

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cla001
  • #2
How to you test for chlorine? What does the test show?

From what I understand, chlorine reaction with sodium thiosulphate (which I believe is likely the main ingredient in Prime) is rather straightforward. Unless you are seriously underdosing Prime, you shouldn't really be having this issue. Do you know if your local water has chlorine or chloramine used as a treatment agent?
 
Wraithen
  • #3
I'm curious how you are testing for chlorine/chloramines also. Never heard of this. Have you also tested after the top fin product?
 
TheShapeofGuillermo
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
How to you test for chlorine? What does the test show?

From what I understand, chlorine reaction with sodium thiosulphate (which I believe is likely the main ingredient in Prime) is rather straightforward. Unless you are seriously underdosing Prime, you shouldn't really be having this issue. Do you know if your local water has chlorine or chloramine used as a treatment agent?

As per my post, I use Tetra Easy Strips to test in addition to API Master test kit. My strips read 0 Chlorine in my other tank that used Top Fin Conditioner, but in the one where I tried prime, it reads 1.0 according to the testing strips.
 
Wraithen
  • #5
How much prime did you add and how did you measure. This is pretty curious. Prime strips chlorine and chloramines and converts then to ammonia, which it then makes safe.

I understood you used strips for the nitrogen, didn't realize that also included chlorine. I don't think I'm familiar with them. Sorry.

Eta: what do you mean by you cannot get an accurate test with the apI master kit? I would test nitrite with it since it's only one bottle and it's the easiest color chart to read.
 
cla001
  • #6
Just curious - have you ever tried using these strips on completely untreated tap water to see what levels of chlorine are there?
Honestly, I don't have a good explanation of your chlorine reading after using Prime - all in all, it likely contains a relatively simple chemical with quite a predictable behavior, so it should remove chlorine/chloramine with no issue.

There is an almost 10 years old thread on Seachem forums that at least once mentions Prime reliably removing ~1.2ppm of chlorine if used in a standard dosage. It also mentions some competitive products initially having a much higher concentration (removing up to 7ppm of chlorine already in standard dosage). That said, my only hypothesis will be that you have water with relatively high chlorine/chloramine concentration (e.g. closer to the top of acceptable levels) and Prime in standard dosage cannot dechlorinate it all. I think the only solution for a peace of mind would be to use a double dose of Prime in that tank (e.g. add a second dose after it already showed 1ppm in water) and repeat the chlorine testing.

Can you access your local water quality reports to see what levels of chlorine/chloramine your municipality uses?

Do you think if there is any chance of pure "physical" factors leading to these readings? (e.g. Prime added to still water and didn't mix well enough, then tested immediately; Prime bottle with bad stabilizer in it / not shaken before use). Just my guesses though )
 
TheShapeofGuillermo
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
Just curious - have you ever tried using these strips on completely untreated tap water to see what levels of chlorine are there?
Honestly, I don't have a good explanation of your chlorine reading after using Prime - all in all, it likely contains a relatively simple chemical with quite a predictable behavior, so it should remove chlorine/chloramine with no issue.

There is an almost 10 years old thread on Seachem forums that at least once mentions Prime reliably removing ~1.2ppm of chlorine if used in a standard dosage. It also mentions some competitive products initially having a much higher concentration (removing up to 7ppm of chlorine already in standard dosage). That said, my only hypothesis will be that you have water with relatively high chlorine/chloramine concentration (e.g. closer to the top of acceptable levels) and Prime in standard dosage cannot dechlorinate it all. I think the only solution for a peace of mind would be to use a double dose of Prime in that tank (e.g. add a second dose after it already showed 1ppm in water) and repeat the chlorine testing.

Can you access your local water quality reports to see what levels of chlorine/chloramine your municipality uses?

Do you think if there is any chance of pure "physical" factors leading to these readings? (e.g. Prime added to still water and didn't mix well enough, then tested immediately; Prime bottle with bad stabilizer in it / not shaken before use). Just my guesses though )

Honestly at this point I’m a little dumbfounded... I just tested a plain bucket of water during a water change for another betta and now it’s saying there’s 0 chlorine???? I tested my Veiltail’s tank and the same reading came up for 0 chlorine (this tank was dosed with prime as well due to a tail injury).

I did another water change and tried the test again in my 3.5 gallon with my female betta, and now it’s coming up as 0 chlorine, minimal nitrite (which I treated promptly with some prime) and o nitrate.

I’ve been using a little over half a teaspoon per 1 gallon of water change in my bucket, but I’m a little confused as to dosage for smaller tanks (it reccomended half a capful for ten gallons, but after consulting this website some say you need minimal dosage of prime).

I have no idea honestly with my prime, it came in the mail and there was leakage from my fin rot medicine and garlic guard, so I’m wondering if that is possibly the culprit??
 
Aqua Hands
  • #8
Easy test strips don't actually test for chlorine IMO. I have dipped mine in straight tap water with has a bit of chlorine and it didn't show.
 
TheShapeofGuillermo
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
How much prime did you add and how did you measure. This is pretty curious. Prime strips chlorine and chloramines and converts then to ammonia, which it then makes safe.

I understood you used strips for the nitrogen, didn't realize that also included chlorine. I don't think I'm familiar with them. Sorry.

Eta: what do you mean by you cannot get an accurate test with the apI master kit? I would test nitrite with it since it's only one bottle and it's the easiest color chart to read.

I added little over half a teaspoon to the water. I’m not sure how much goes in.

I cannot get an accurate reading with nitrate on the API Master test kit. Nitrite is easy as is everything else but Nitrate always gives me problems even when other strip tests confirm the presence.

Easy test strips don't actually test for chlorine IMO. I have dipped mine in straight tap water with has a bit of chlorine and it didn't show.

I’ve tried before and they’re pretty accurate, but I’m not sure my water actually has chlorine. It’s desert water so I’m not sure what we have XD
 
Wraithen
  • #10
Are you banging the #2 bottle on the counter pretty hard? I promise you won't break it. That bottle doesn't stay mixed and a part of it will crystallize. Smack it 20 to 30 times on the counter and then shake it for 30 seconds. That usually does the trick.
 
bgclarke
  • #11
There is an almost 10 years old thread on Seachem forums that at least once mentions Prime reliably removing ~1.2ppm of chlorine if used in a standard dosage. It also mentions some competitive products initially having a much higher concentration (removing up to 7ppm of chlorine already in standard dosage). That said, my only hypothesis will be that you have water with relatively high chlorine/chloramine concentration (e.g. closer to the top of acceptable levels) and Prime in standard dosage cannot dechlorinate it all. I think the only solution for a peace of mind would be to use a double dose of Prime in that tank (e.g. add a second dose after it already showed 1ppm in water) and repeat the chlorine testing.

Can you access your local water quality reports to see what levels of chlorine/chloramine your municipality uses?
Thanks for that link.

I went and checked the latest water reports for our two treatment plants and the average is 1.8 ppm with a maximum of 2.3 ppm.

I haven't had any odd side effects that I can tell.

I follow the two drops per gallon rule and dose for the full volume of the tank, as opposed to just dosing for the amount of water being changed.

I do add some extra drops, 2 to 8 depending on tank size, so maybe that's enough to cover the extra amount.
 
cla001
  • #12
I’ve been using a little over half a teaspoon per 1 gallon of water change in my bucket, but I’m a little confused as to dosage for smaller tanks (it reccomended half a capful for ten gallons, but after consulting this website some say you need minimal dosage of prime).
Insulin syringe. It is simply amazing for smaller precise dosages of prime (well, pretty much of everything). The normal/standard Prime dosage as stated by Seachem is 0.1 ml per 1 gal which is hard to measure using regular syringes for smaller tanks. Insulin syringes are amazing to this end as they are designed to measure stuff almost down to 0.01ml accuracy or even better.
I don't know how easily you can get them locally (I guess depends on a state/municipality, some states like NJ might even consider those syringes "drug paraphernalia" lol), but they are usually easy to get online. Some people say you can often just come to the pharmacy and ask for one.

Honestly at this point I’m a little dumbfounded... I just tested a plain of water during a water change for another betta and now it’s saying there’s 0 chlorine???? I tested my Veiltail’s tank and the same reading came up for 0 chlorine (this tank was dosed with prime as well due to a tail injury).

From what I've heard, test strips can be very inaccurate from time to time and they are extremely sensitive to many factors like sweat on hands when handling them, small unnoticeable drops of liquids on them etc etc etc. I honestly wouldn't lose my mind over random chlorine readings using these strips as long as you are using some kind of dechlorinator/conditioner.

Nitrate always gives me problems even when other strip tests confirm the presence.
I don't know if that's the case with you, but I figured it takes some time and practice to familiarize yourself with how different readings of API tests look like. I recently ran (just for the sake of my own understanding) an experiment with nitrates and another experiment with ammonia. Useless as it might look, it actually gave me much confidence in my ability to "read" colors properly as now I have some in mind with what I need to compare it to... So, just a thought, maybe, if you have some time, you can run something similar for yourself and see how different concentrations would read? (following other advice from this thread about shaking etc.)
 
TheShapeofGuillermo
  • Thread Starter
  • #13
Easy test strips don't actually test for chlorine IMO. I have dipped mine in straight tap water with has a bit of chlorine and it didn't show.

I’ve had quite a bit of luck with them, but perhaps it depends on the Strip brand? I’m not sure... thank you for your time!

Are you banging the #2 bottle on the counter pretty hard? I promise you won't break it. That bottle doesn't stay mixed and a part of it will crystallize. Smack it 20 to 30 times on the counter and then shake it for 30 seconds. That usually does the trick.

I’ll have to start trying that, but I’m wondering how to open up the little vial once you shake it to mix solution one? Thank you so much for responding

Insulin syringe. It is simply amazing for smaller precise dosages of prime (well, pretty much of everything). The normal/standard Prime dosage as stated by Seachem is 0.1 ml per 1 gal which is hard to measure using regular syringes for smaller tanks. Insulin syringes are amazing to this end as they are designed to measure stuff almost down to 0.01ml accuracy or even better.
I don't know how easily you can get them locally (I guess depends on a state/municipality, some states like NJ might even consider those syringes "drug paraphernalia" lol), but they are usually easy to get online. Some people say you can often just come to the pharmacy and ask for one.



From what I've heard, test strips can be very inaccurate from time to time and they are extremely sensitive to many factors like sweat on hands when handling them, small unnoticeable drops of liquids on them etc etc etc. I honestly wouldn't lose my mind over random chlorine readings using these strips as long as you are using some kind of dechlorinator/conditioner.


I don't know if that's the case with you, but I figured it takes some time and practice to familiarize yourself with how different readings of API tests look like. I recently ran (just for the sake of my own understanding) an experiment with nitrates and another experiment with ammonia. Useless as it might look, it actually gave me much confidence in my ability to "read" colors properly as now I have some in mind with what I need to compare it to... So, just a thought, maybe, if you have some time, you can run something similar for yourself and see how different concentrations would read? (following other advice from this thread about shaking etc.)
Thank you very much for your cohesive, in-depth answers really it means a lot and I hope I can figure this mystery out!
 
Michael.j.gomez
  • #14
Hello, I've read on this site, a good rule of thumb that's from the seachem official forum is 4 drops of prime per gal. I use eye dropper w/no problems. Hope this helps.(thread was my plecostomus) I think!
 
TheShapeofGuillermo
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
Hello, I've read on this site, a good rule of thumb that's from the seachem official forum is 4 drops of prime per gal. I use eye dropper w/no problems. Hope this helps.(thread was my plecostomus) I think!
Thank you so much!
 

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