Question Chloramine

dfisherman

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Got a report from my water company I do have chloramine. When and if I can ever establish a cycle will the bacteria take care of chloramine. Or do I need to get a water filter to remove it?
 
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dfisherman

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Good I use a extra filter that has carbon and I use Prime. But will this be why it's taking so long for my tanks to cycle?
 

firemouthfreak

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Cycling of fish tanks takes time.. Some cycles are faster than others.. I cycled using fish, and mine was done in 3 weeks. Are you doing a fishless cycle? If you are, I have no clue on how to do it and so hopefully the other members that do it will chime in.
 

jetajockey

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Hmm.. I guess I was one of the lucky ones
Yes, 3 weeks is a very short time. There are many different variables involved in tank cycling so its hard to say whether one certain thing attributed to fast cycling or if many things combined did it.
 

Shawnie

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If your filter has Activated Carbon then it can remove the Chloramine, if not then you should be adding Water Conditioner that removes chlorine and chloramine. Hope this helps
I respectfully disagree....activated carbon will NOT remove chloramines.....
Good I use a extra filter that has carbon and I use Prime. But will this be why it's taking so long for my tanks to cycle?
not sure what the history is of the tank dfisherman to give an answer for that.....sorry

do you have a thread about the situation?
 

bass master

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activated carbon can remove chloramines, they sell water filters full of activated carbon for this purpose, whether a filter cartridge with carbon will remove the chloramine before it kills your bacteria and your fish, however, is a different question.
 

Jaysee

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If water conditioner is being used, then whether or not A/C removes chloramines is a moot point. Water conditioners break the bond between chlorine and ammonia (chloramine), so that the chlorine is rendered harmless and the ammonia is converted to ammonium, which is then consumed by the biofilter. And if water conditioner is not required, there aren't chloramines.

People who have high amounts of chloramines should be dosing heavy on the conditioner, just to be safe.
 

Shawnie

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activated carbon can remove chloramines, they sell water filters full of activated carbon for this purpose, whether a filter cartridge with carbon will remove the chloramine before it kills your bacteria and your fish, however, is a different question.
I stand corrected and learned something new today! ty bassmaster! but, how long does it take? as you mentioned, running carbon can remove such things, but how long does it take and will it kill the bacteria if the process isnt instant....
http://www.algone.com/index.php?view=article&id=69:activated-carbon-in-the-aquarium&catid=39:aquarium-filtration&Itemid=53&option=com_content
 

bass master

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fascinating link shawnie! I had no idea how much surface area that stuff has, all kinds of good info in there

That link made it sound like in an aquarium setting, it will take the carbon 24-48 hours to remove most impurities, and as far as I know chlorine and chloramine will kill most bacteria almost instantly. So Im assuming its best not to add straight tap water to your tank even with fresh carbon.
 
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dfisherman

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The water we are talking about is used in my 6gal Betta tank, my 10gal guppy tank, and my 55gal going thru a fish less cycle. All of these tanks have had several threads posted on them. Was just wondering if the chloramine is slowing the cycle process down. I,m using triple the amount of prime. The chloramine average is 1.12ppm.x
 

firemouthfreak

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The water we are talking about is used in my 6gal Betta tank, my 10gal guppy tank, and my 55gal going thru a fish less cycle. All of these tanks have had several threads posted on them. Was just wondering if the chloramine is slowing the cycle process down. I,m using triple the amount of prime. The chloramine average is 1.12ppm.x
If you are using any type of water conditioner, the chloramine shouldn't be a problem, therefore I don't think it is slowing down the process.
 

bass master

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the standard dosage of prime should detox 3ppm of chloramine, I dont think a triple dose would be necessary, although Im not sure if that would slow down the cycle, I cant really help you out with any of the other cycling stuff, sometimes it just takes a while though, thats all I know
 

Kunsthure

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Look at it this way: you're getting free ammonia for your fishless cycle! Because of the chloramine used by my water treatment facility, I have 1ppm ammonia in my tap water.

How can carbon remove chloramine but not ammonia, though? If it removes chloramine, it should be removing ammonia since chloramine is just a compound if chlorine and ammonia.

-Lisa
 

bass master

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my guess would be that it is because chloramine (NH2Cl) is a larger molecule than ammonia (NH3) and has many more electrons. It is my understanding that AC works through london dispersion forces, Im not gonna get technical, but a larger molecule with more electrons will have stronger london dispersion forces and can be captured more easily by the activated carbon. Thats just my assumption though, could be wrong.

Keep in mind that two chemicals can act completely different when combined then they would alone, just look at salt, sodium chloride. Sodium will explode if exposed to air, and chlorine is toxic to humans when inhaled. Together, they form a compound that can be helpful to the human body and has many uses.
 

catsma_97504

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Was just wondering if the chloramine is slowing the cycle process down. I,m using triple the amount of prime. The chloramine average is 1.12ppm.x
Did you measure the chloramine from your tap or your tank? Chloramine can be dangerous with lead pipes as it will leach the lead increasing its concentration in your tap. Since chloramine is a disinfectant, if that is the measurement from your tank, then you are killing off your BB.

Did you ever try using the normal dose of Prime? Triple dose could be causing issues and slowing down your cycle.
 
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dfisherman

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The chloramine reading is from a report I got from my water dept. Don't know how to measure chloramine in tank? I was told by someone else on this form to use more prime with high ammonia readings from tap. You here different things from everyone/
 
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