Chili Rasbora Deformity Question

NotSarah

Hey guys -

So I added some chili rasboras to my tank. They’re all doing well, eating when I feed them and exploring their environment - they seem happy! I noticed that one of them has part of their tail fin missing, it’s a small piece and there is no other discoloration on the tail indicating rot or disease - unless it could be fin rot without discoloration or any other symptoms..I hope not. Another thing I noticed was that same fish has a slightly deformed spine - there is a curvature to it, not huge. The chilis are still juveniles so the curve might become more apparent as it grows.

As for the tail fin - I did some preliminary reading/research before coming here. Supposedly fins can grow back, which makes total sense! Is there anything I could do to help him out more though in that process (aside from keeping water clean and parameters stable)? He doesn’t seem to have any issues swimming or anything, but I’m still keeping my eye on him to make sure there aren’t any changes or new developments. Also, is he going to be able to live a happy/healthy life with these deformities? Is it possible the tail fin was that way when he was born considering the spine is also deformed?

For reference:
- They’re in a tank with neocardinas and pygmy corys - so I don’t think anyone would have nipped at their fin. I really hope not…
- The water parameters are normal/fine (not sure if that matters here but I felt I should mention that)
- Lastly, I used Kordon Fish Protector when I moved them in to help with the stress. Also don’t know if that matters but just wanted to note everything I could think of!

Thanks to anyone who helps! :)
 

SparkyJones

two things that may help, keep nitrates really low, like below 10ppm to promote a healthy immune system and healing, and low stress.

You could try and add Seachem equilibrium to the tank following the recommended dosage, it's for plants but it will raise calcium in the water and the GH some, and the fish will absorb what they need of the calcium and this might sort out the curved spine, it depends if it's a birth defect from egg, an injury, or caused by a deficiency during development.

Neither of these will hurt anyone in the tank if you did them, if anything it would help everyone look their best.
 

NotSarah

two things that may help, keep nitrates really low, like below 10ppm to promote a healthy immune system and healing, and low stress.

You could try and add Seachem equilibrium to the tank following the recommended dosage, it's for plants but it will raise calcium in the water and the GH some, and the fish will absorb what they need of the calcium and this might sort out the curved spine, it depends if it's a birth defect from egg, an injury, or caused by a deficiency during development.

Neither of these will hurt anyone in the tank if you did them, if anything it would help everyone look their best.
Thanks for that. Great tips.

Nitrates are super minimal, close to zero. I don’t have a big bio load in the tank and I care for it well.

I’ve read into equilibrium before - won’t a swing in water parameter affect shrimp? Thought they were very sensitive to that.
 

SparkyJones

Thanks for that. Great tips.

Nitrates are super minimal, close to zero. I don’t have a big bio load in the tank and I care for it well.

I’ve read into equilibrium before - won’t a swing in water parameter affect shrimp? Thought they were very sensitive to that.
I don't think so, People keep shrimp and plants in the same tank, and add buffers/fertilizers/co2 ect. as needed.

For sure the shrimps can benefit from Calcium also for their shrimpy shells, As long as the GH is between 4-8 dGH (75-145ppm) should be fine. it's just a bit more calcium, in case the fish is low on it or the tank is low on it,
the thing is though the GH test doesn't differentiate between calcium, or potassium, or magnesium, or what the ratio is of these. so it could read a 6 dKH, and be all Potassium and Magnesium and no Calcium.

I don't think it would hurt anything if it's done within reason. Shrimp have problems with Chlorine, Ammonia and Nitrites, Not even a little bit of those.
they can have issue with temperature change, or a pH shift.
Fairly certain people supplement GH and KH when needed either by adding calcium carbonates or those buffer shells or pyramid block things without issue.
I'm not suggesting messing with KH or the pH, only the GH which is the nutrients in the water.
 

NotSarah

I don't think so, People keep shrimp and plants in the same tank, and add buffers/fertilizers/co2 ect. as needed.

For sure the shrimps can benefit from Calcium also for their shrimpy shells, As long as the GH is between 4-8 dGH (75-145ppm) should be fine. it's just a bit more calcium, in case the fish is low on it or the tank is low on it,
the thing is though the GH test doesn't differentiate between calcium, or potassium, or magnesium, or what the ratio is of these. so it could read a 6 dKH, and be all Potassium and Magnesium and no Calcium.

I don't think it would hurt anything if it's done within reason. Shrimp have problems with Chlorine, Ammonia and Nitrites, Not even a little bit of those.
they can have issue with temperature change, or a pH shift.
Fairly certain people supplement GH and KH when needed either by adding calcium carbonates or those buffer shells or pyramid block things without issue.
I'm not suggesting messing with KH or the pH, only the GH which is the nutrients in the water.
Still going to get equilibrium I think depending on parameters if tank im cycling. But sad update, the fish is on the bottom of the tanks swims every now and then, but stays on the bottom. I’m assuming this is a fatal sign?
 

SparkyJones

Still going to get equilibrium I think depending on parameters if tank im cycling. But sad update, the fish is on the bottom of the tanks swims every now and then, but stays on the bottom. I’m assuming this is a fatal sign?
Yeah. Rasboras aren't known for laying down really, they are usually swimming or worst case suspending in place to rest. It's not a good sign when a fish that always mobile and up in the water is down on the bottom. Sorry.
 

NotSarah

Yeah. Rasboras aren't known for laying down really, they are usually swimming or worst case suspending in place to rest. It's not a good sign when a fish that always mobile and up in the water is down on the bottom. Sorry.
yeahhh, I think I was just unlucky. The lfs felt bad too and gave me credit for the next batch he gets. Being nice pays off thankfully. I feel bad for the fish though. I know this stuff happens, but oof.
 

SparkyJones

yeahhh, I think I was just unlucky. The lfs felt bad too and gave me credit for the next batch he gets. Being nice pays off thankfully. I feel bad for the fish though. I know this stuff happens, but oof.
yeah, I mean there's defects that should be culled out from every batch of fish, but some just slip through the cracks, or a breeder spends a lot of time inspecting fish, or being too critical and culling fish that don't need to be.

That one slipped through the cracks most likely. Sorry for your loss.
 

NotSarah

yeah, I mean there's defects that should be culled out from every batch of fish, but some just slip through the cracks, or a breeder spends a lot of time inspecting fish, or being too critical and culling fish that don't need to be.

That one slipped through the cracks most likely. Sorry for your loss.
Thank you. Yeahhh, I’ll try and inspect the next ones before I take them home if they let me. Learned my lesson the hard way. Thankfully my other ones are still happy :)
 

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