Cherry Shrimp In A Temporary Bucket, Ok?

JoeCamaro

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Hello
I have been wanting to build a cherry shrimp tank for the longest time. I have a 5 gallon tank that I want to use for them.
I found somebody that breeds them and I want to get some before they are gone, but the tank is not ready yet. I m working on it, but I still need to finish it.

I have a heather and a sponge filter that I bought to use in the RCS tank. The sponge is inside the HOB filter in my 46 gallon. I was thinking to use water from the 46 and use the sponge filter to get an instant cycle and use it in the temporary house.

Questions: Will RCS be ok in a temporary bucket or storage bin?
Do I need substrate or can they be in a bare bottom for a week?
Will I get an instant cycle with my sponge filter?

Thank you all.
 

SegiDream

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You may or may not get an instant cycle, if the sponge filter has been in there for about a month it should work. You probably don't need the heater, I don't use one with mine and per the room temperature the water stays between 70-75 degrees. The shrimp don't necessarily need a substrate at the moment but they will appreciate something to hold onto. Like a huge clump of moss or water lettuce or water sprite that has dangly roots, they'll spend all day "grazing" off something like that too.
 

Bithimala

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They should be fine for a bit in a bucket or storage bin, but agreed, plants or something will help them feel more secure. I've unintentionally kept some in a storage bin for about a year... felt horrible when I realized they were in there, which was well after I'd let the water that was sitting in there evaporate.
 

tjander

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Let me start out by saying that this comment is based on my experiences over a couple years with shrimp. I have killed my fair share over this time these are my lessons learned.

First, RCS must have a stable environment. PH and temperatures don’t matter ( within reason) to much but they must stay consistent.

Second, they need zero ammonia, and nitrite, and < 50 Nitrate

Third, a mature tank, lots of biofilm built up

Fourth, lots of hiding places. Driftwood is very popular with RCS, I think it’s a good place for biofilm to develop. Live plants are good, I have never not had live plants so I don’t know if it’s a must or not but shrimp like to graze off of them.

Fifth, every single time I rushed a setup no matter how perfect I think I had it, I killed most every shrimp.

My friend do yourself a favor, do not rush into it. Get your tank setup, add a small fish or two let it run for two to three months, pull the fish add your shrimp. Make sure you follow a good acclimation process ( I like the drip method )
A good light is a plus, helps in algae growth, and is needed for the plants.

Also, remember the smaller the tank the faster things change, in regards to your water. Ph may swing up or down very quickly as will water temperature. Make sure you understand how your tank reacts as it matures.

The person who breeds them, will have many more shrimp going forward so you should have ample opportunity to get more. Please don’t rush your setup, your chances for success are not good if you rush.

Again, this is based on my experiences only. Others may have had different results. Do some research while your tank is getting established lots of info on the net is available.

Good luck
 

Rtessy

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I've been keeping some CBS michlings in a 5gal as a temporary quarantine for a few weeks now. It's entirely uncycled, I had had cycled media to put in but got a weird bacterial outbreak so I decided against it. I bought a new tiny sponge filter (they were without a filter for four days, but I had a spare airpump so there was surface movement) and they also have a heater set to 73°. I threw in a TON of anacharis, enough to cover about half of the actual tank, and surprisingly I haven't seen any signs of nutrient deficiencies yet. I wouldn't rush into it, they always do much better in a tank that has been going for 1-2 months after being fully cycled, but if weird circumstances arise it is possible to keep them in a temporary bucket.
 
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JoeCamaro

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tjander said:
Let me start out by saying that this comment is based on my experiences over a couple years with shrimp. I have killed my fair share over this time these are my lessons learned.

First, RCS must have a stable environment. PH and temperatures don’t matter ( within reason) to much but they must stay consistent.

Second, they need zero ammonia, and nitrite, and < 50 Nitrate

Third, a mature tank, lots of biofilm built up

Fourth, lots of hiding places. Driftwood is very popular with RCS, I think it’s a good place for biofilm to develop. Live plants are good, I have never not had live plants so I don’t know if it’s a must or not but shrimp like to graze off of them.

Fifth, every single time I rushed a setup no matter how perfect I think I had it, I killed most every shrimp.

My friend do yourself a favor, do not rush into it. Get your tank setup, add a small fish or two let it run for two to three months, pull the fish add your shrimp. Make sure you follow a good acclimation process ( I like the drip method )
A good light is a plus, helps in algae growth, and is needed for the plants.

Also, remember the smaller the tank the faster things change, in regards to your water. Ph may swing up or down very quickly as will water temperature. Make sure you understand how your tank reacts as it matures.

The person who breeds them, will have many more shrimp going forward so you should have ample opportunity to get more. Please don’t rush your setup, your chances for success are not good if you rush.

Again, this is based on my experiences only. Others may have had different results. Do some research while your tank is getting established lots of info on the net is available.

Good luck
Thank you, that was very informative. I have to admit that I rushed it, though. I already bought the shrimp and set-up the tank.
I think it is now a game of "survival of the fittest".

I will keep watching them and try to provide the best living conditions as I can. I can't move them to my established tank, because probably they won't last a minute before they get eaten.

If things don't go well, I will take this as a lesson. I wish I read your post before I bought the shrimp, but now it is too late for that.

I appreciate the info.
 

tjander

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Question, do you have anything else in the tank besides the shrimp?
If not then the bio load from shrimp is very small. My point is the nitrates should not get too high. Keep an eye on the conditions but I would try and hold off on water changes as long as you can. Others have posted what the parameters should be so try to get to that point and leave it alone.
Hope you understand where I am coming from, I am not saying don’t do water changes, but do smaller ones maybe every other week if your water parameters will allow it.
5 gal tank do less then a gallon.

Good luck to you
 

Tsin21

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They will be fine as long as you provide them with lots of plants. I have cherry shrimps breeding in my buckets outside and they have been there for more than 6 months . No filter, only plants and water top off when I pwc my main tank.
 

Sarah73

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Oh let me say! Once you move the sponge filter to the 5 gallon, move the shrimp immd there so the cycle will contiune to go.
 

tjander

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How many shrimp did you get? I don’t know how many you need to keep the cycle going. Again due to the light bio load, I would think a lot. But if they don’t produce a lot of ammonia then maybe it not important. Just add Prime to the water.
 
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JoeCamaro

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Thank you everybody for your input and suggestions.

The 5 gallon tank was set up on Sunday.
Here is the link to the build thread.

I got 12 shrimp to start with. There is nothing else in the tank. I could move an oto, but being a new tank, there is no algae for him, although I feed them other things too.

Thanks all.
 
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