Cherry shrimp dying.

PhoenixPhire

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IMG_4610.JPGAbout two weeks ago I got 6 cherry shrimp in my 20 gal long, it has been setup for like a year now with tetras but I got rid of them, anyways 3 of the cherry shrimp have died,I have checked my water parameters GH is 80 but it is really hard to tell on the API strips, the KH 20 ph 6.5 and 0 nitrites. I do weekly 10% water change. S I don't know how to tell if it is a disease or what (this is my first time ever with cherry shrimp. I had a friend give me one amano shrimp so it has been in the tank for almost half a year.
 

StarGirl

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That white ring they call the white ring of death. See if you can find some threads on molting issues I think that was what that was from. Not a cherry expert by any means.
 

Inner10

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Molting problem because your KH is too low and your PH is a little low. You have a buffering substrate in there?
 

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Have you done a water change recently, and perhaps the temp or ph wasn't stable? I'm not a shrimp expert, but I heard the shrimp are vulnerable to swings in ph
 

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You mean ppm, right? In that case, your GH is much too low...shrimp and other crustaceans need substantial amounts of calcium and magnesium to molt (If you mean degrees, both KH and GH are far too high). I would recommend slowly increasing the GH to several times that amount over a few water changes.
 

richiep

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Looks like you've got some serious moult issues there, your ph is to low at 6.5 it will stress shrimp which leads to health problems, you gh is to low that needs to go up to 140 to 160ppm 8 to 9 Dkh. the one in the picture doesn't have disease but as moult issues
You must raise you ph slowly or run the risk of killing all
 
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PhoenixPhire

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Joshaeus said:
You mean ppm, right? In that case, your GH is much too low...shrimp and other crustaceans need substantial amounts of calcium and magnesium to molt (If you mean degrees, both KH and GH are far too high). I would recommend slowly increasing the GH to several times that amount over a few water changes.
how would I do that; what would you recommend.
 
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PhoenixPhire

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Inner10 said:
Molting problem because your KH is too low and your PH is a little low. You have a buffering substrate in there?
My substrate is one part fluval stratum for plants, and two parts Carib sea eco complete. I also have a cuttlebone, and have heard that it is good for snails because it has calcium, so maybe I could do the same?
 
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PhoenixPhire

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Joshaeus said:
You mean ppm, right? In that case, your GH is much too low...shrimp and other crustaceans need substantial amounts of calcium and magnesium to molt (If you mean degrees, both KH and GH are far too high). I would recommend slowly increasing the GH to several times that amount over a few water changes.
I don't mean degrees. :)
 
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PhoenixPhire

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richie.p said:
Looks like you've got some serious moult issues there, your ph is to low at 6.5 it will stress shrimp which leads to health problems, you gh is to low that needs to go up to 140 to 160ppm 8 to 9 Dkh. the one in the picture doesn't have disease but as moult issues
You must raise you ph slowly or run the risk of killing all
I read that 1 degree is 17.9 ppm for gh, but is it the same for kh? I'm assuming so....
 

Inner10

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PhoenixPhire said:
My substrate is one part fluval stratum for plants, and two parts Carib sea eco complete. I also have a cuttlebone, and have heard that it is good for snails because it has calcium, so maybe I could do the same?
Stratum will strip your KH and buffer your PH down. It's good for Caridina but not great for Neos. Carib sea is supposedly inert...but they all mess with your values a but at first, hence why most planted substrates say to do big water changes at first.

There isn't a heck of a lot you can do to increase your PH or KH as your substrate will keep buffering, and you will just exhaust it's capacity quicker.
 
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PhoenixPhire

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Inner10 said:
Stratum will strip your KH and buffer your PH down. It's good for Caridina but not great for Neos. Carib sea is supposedly inert...but they all mess with your values a but at first, hence why most planted substrates say to do big water changes at first.

There isn't a heck of a lot you can do to increase your PH or KH as your substrate will keep buffering, and you will just exhaust it's capacity quicker.
Should I try removing some substrate and replacing maybe with crushed coral?
 

Inner10

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PhoenixPhire said:
Should I try removing some substrate and replacing maybe with crushed coral?
I really don't know, this is where I've reached the limit of my experiences and I really don't wanna throw out advice without having the first hand experience. I tried to keep Neos with a buffering substrate and lost a few due to molt issues aswell yet I've read online stories of people having success keeping Neos with active substrates. The best solution is rehome them in a tank with a different substrate or keep different shrimp. Amanos seem to molt fine with active substrate.

Depending on how much stratum you have in there some water changes may eat up the buffering capacity.

What are the parameters of your source water?
 

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I find neos quite compatible with fluval stratum. Fluval stratum will lower the KH but not GH. Mind you, fluval stratum is also not the buffer-iest of buffering substrates. Keep your GH up with a GH booster and feed them calcium rich foods. Try keeping a minimum of 6 degrees GH (107 ppm).
 

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I've had problems with my shrimp as well, and with my digging I found this guide for shrimp in general. A method you could use is using RO water then adding the KH degrees, which could be used by adding baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) and you could add GH by the methods listed by the others. If you don't have a RO unit, I buy water from Walmart from their machine, costs like 39 cents per gallon and it only has trace ions which is like 12 ppm. It works great for my shrimp tank. Also, would recommend getting an apI gh/kh test kit, the dropper bottle one. It's like 12 dollars but we'll worth it
 

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