Changing water to adjust PH Help 

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Donetta

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I purchased me new Betta Richie for my 6.6 gal tank last Thursday. When I tested the water that he came in the PH was 8.2, so I cleaned the tank and put fresh tap water in for him with the same PH to avoid shock. I want to use the bottled spring water that I have for him instead that has a PH of 7. How can I change over and use the spring water without shocking him? I read that a PH change of greater than .2 can cause shock. Thank you.
 

Tigerfishy

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You will have to acclimate him slowly. Start by changing the water with the water you wish to use, but only a little at a time. Change perhaps 5-10% every couple days (someone say if this is the right amount!), but put the new water in slowly too, over the course of an hour or two say...

Eventually there will be all new water, and water changes can be done as normal.

I can't say if this is the correct method, but I would do it this way to do it slowly and keep a close eye on the betta during this just in case.

Wait for more answers first, as I have never had to do this, but I know taking it slowly is always a good thing when you're changing any water conditions! Just don't use chemicals to alter the pH, if they fail, the tank crashes...
 

blkdeath75

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When it comes to pH, sometimes it's better to leave it be if they are living in it already. Changing it, if not done EXTREMELY slow, could be fatal if they are bred and kept/shipped in a higher pH water. I currently have neons and a betta living in 7.8-8.0 pH tap and they are all in real good shape.
 

Aquarist

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Good morning,

Some good information from members above.

As stated, most fish can adapt to the pH levels that we have to offer right from the tap. My pH level for my betta Wriggley is 8.0 and he's doing great.

To get a true pH level from your tap, fill a bucket with water and add an air stone/supply line. Wait 24 hours to test the pH. Wait another 24 hours and test again and compare the difference if any. Now you should have a true pH level.

Keep in mind that pH levels are going to drop over time. The best way to maintain a certain pH level is via frequent water changes. I never recommend chemicals to alter pH levels as they are unstable and can lead to a pH crash resulting in fish loss.

If you insist on using spring water, then with your next water change I recommend adding the spring water by doing the drip method for acclimation. Link below:
https://www.fishlore.com/acclimating-tropicalfish.htm

Here is a link on pH that will come in handy too:


Best wishes!
Ken
 

Tigerfishy

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The drip method, I couldn't remember the name of it for thinking too hard (it's so obviuos, I should have known, there's no excuse really...)! Thanks guys!!

I just never realised that they could live in that high a pH, I learnt something there!
 
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Donetta

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Now I'm trying to figure if I should adjust it at all. The books say 6.8 to 7.5 is best. Yes he was in PH of 8.2 but wud keeping it there shorten his life span? If leaving it in this range is best I can do that. He probably wasn't raised at that level but probably put in 8.2 at Petco. Can we take a vote? Lol. Should I Leave Richie in 8.2 PH water or should I slowly adjust down to the recommended level of 6.8 to 7.5 recommended by the breeders? Thanks!
 

Meenu

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Fluctuations in pH are much more likely to shorten his life span. I'd say leave the pH alone.
 

trailblazer295

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I'd leave it alone if he is healthy and active, most fish can handle water conditions above there "normal range" it is the stability and consistency that is the important thing. My local city water is known to be fairly hard and higher PH but fish raised in it get used to it and live normal length fish lives. It is when you try to control it to a certain number that stresses them out.
 

fraserm

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I'm just wondering why do you want to use bottled spring water? wouldn't that be more hassle?

Thanks
 
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Donetta

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Yea it is more of a hassel because I have to buy its probably $10 a month, bring home from store and always make sure I have it on hand. But I simply thought PH in such a high range was not healthy for him. In addition 8.2 is the PH rightout the tap and once it's acerated want the PH climb even higher? I'd hate to think he could be living in 8.4 PH.
 

Kupcake

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I think you should leave it as tap water. Changing the pH will be more stressful than him living out his life in higher than normal I think. Also, if you don't have spring water on hand, or if they stop making or carrying that specific spring water you will have to change him to another pH later...stick with what you have at home is my opinion.
 
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Donetta

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Ok. Thanks for all the responses, it's greatly appreciated.
 
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