Changing Water And Conditioning

acjag
  • #1
Ok, I'm somewhat new to hobby. I just performed a water change and added some Aqueon water conditioner per instructions on label. Within their label they have written that conditioner " Detoxifies heavy metals, ammonia and other elements released from fish waste." Awesome. Wait a minute. Detoxifies heavy metals. What do they think is in my water that needs detoxified? If were harmful to fish then it's probably harmful to me and my family or unless quantity is low enough that it's not harmful to humans but would be to fish, ok I'll buy that scenario. I live in a boro so I'm certain the water has be treated in some form or fashion. So now is the question that if it detoxifies heavy metal then the liquid ferts I add 24 hours later are rendered useless? One more question that probably will make a seasoned hobbyist shiver, guess what I use for ph down.
 
matthewb01
  • #2
Well I use seachem prime. Btw you mix it in the water before you do the water change. Don't put tap water in the tank and then use the conditioner. Its main purpose really is just dechlorinating the water. I wouldn't worry about heavy metals. I use ro/dI water on some tanks just to be safe and primed tap water on others. Just don't add your fertilizer before the water change and you're fine. I add mine right after.
 
Francine
  • #3
Uhhh why do you want to alter your PH? What is it at now? 99% of fish will adapt to whatever the ph in your tank is... and using those products will just make it jump all over the place... you will add the PH down and then it will slowly climb back up and then you will add it again and it will climb back up.... usually there is no need to alter ph... unless it’s extreme... mine is 8.3 out of the tap and I use nothing and never have... my fish, Axolotls and fully aquatic frogs are all fine... (I have 8 + tanks lol) and have never used any ph stuff

As for the heavy metals I’m not really sure what that part means but it’s more for the chlorine and chloramines that the city adds to the water... it’s finw for humans.... VERY toxic for fish... in my personal opinion I prefer to use Prime... it’s more widely used and recommended but that’s totally your call...but if you so choose finish off that bottle and maybe switch.... it’s a very good product....
Just make sure you are doing the dosing correctly.... if you are using buckets and know exactly how many gallons you have taken out... add it to your last bucket based on what you took out only..... other choose to add it directly to the tank (like for people who do water changes with a python) then you add it as your tank is filling back up BUT you add it for how many gallons your tank is.... hope that helped a little...
(And there are ways to more naturally lower your PH but I would just leave it as is if it’s not extreme) believe me most fish will adapt to it
 
matthewb01
  • #4
Uhhh why do you want to alter your PH? What is it at now? 99% of fish will adapt to whatever the ph in your tank is... and using those products will just make it jump all over the place... you will add the PH down and then it will slowly climb back up and then you will add it again and it will climb back up.... usually there is no need to alter ph... unless it’s extreme... mine is 8.3 out of the tap and I use nothing and never have... my fish, Axolotls and fully aquatic frogs are all fine... (I have 8 + tanks lol) and have never used any ph stuff

As for the heavy metals I’m not really sure what that part means but it’s more for the chlorine and chloramines that the city adds to the water... it’s finw for humans.... VERY toxic for fish... in my personal opinion I prefer to use Prime... it’s more widely used and recommended but that’s totally your call...but if you so choose finish off that bottle and maybe switch.... it’s a very good product....
Just make sure you are doing the dosing correctly.... if you are using buckets and know exactly how many gallons you have taken out... add it to your last bucket based on what you took out only..... other choose to add it directly to the tank (like for people who do water changes with a python) then you add it as your tank is filling back up BUT you add it for how many gallons your tank is.... hope that helped a little...
(And there are ways to more naturally lower your PH but I would just leave it as is if it’s not extreme) believe me most fish will adapt to it
Yeah I'm not really sure about the heavy metals too lol. I just know to avoid buying protien powder with heavy metals in them I'm assuming lead?
 
Francine
  • #5
Probably... but why do you want to lower your PH and what is it out of the tap and then what is your “true” PH?
 
matthewb01
  • #6
Probably... but why do you want to lower your PH and what is it out of the tap and then what is your “true” PH?
Beats me! I didn't start this thread . I currently have 4 tanks and don't touch the ph on any of them. The only tank I will even consider messing with the ph for is when I set up my 12o gallon mbuna tank and that's if the rock doesn't raise it enough in the first place. As to why the person that started this thread does it doesn't really make sense to change the ph for fish that don't require soft or hard water such as discus or african cichlids.
 
matthewb01
  • #7
I am also wondering why would I shiver after hearing the reason?
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
I'm not understanding why so much negative thoughts on lowering ph (no offense intended). All the reading I've done says that this type of fish or that type of plant likes this certain ph. This is why I adj. ph to neutral 7. It's written that a neutral ph of 7 is best for community tanks.
 
matthewb01
  • #9
I'm not understanding why so much negative thoughts on lowering ph (no offense intended). All the reading I've done says that this type of fish or that type of plant likes this certain ph. This is why I adj. ph to neutral 7. It's written that a neutral ph of 7 is best for community tanks.
It just isn't really necessary as most freshwater fish can tolerate a wide range of ph. Unless you have discus you really don't need to go through any crazy methods of lowering ph. I have loads of dritfwood in my 55 gallon. If you want to keep your ph lower just put driftwood in. Boil it first to remove tannins unless you want tea colored water.
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #10
I am also wondering why would I shiver after hearing the reason?
my question was to what I use to lower ph, not why.
 
matthewb01
  • #11
my question was to what I use to lower ph, not why.
Oops. But anyway as long as your aquarium ph is in between 6.5-7.5 you're fine as most fish need ph somewhere around there. Some prefer 6-7 some prefer 6.5-7.5 but unless I'm trying to create a biotope tank where I'm trying to get as close to a fishes natural habitat specifically to entise breeding. I wouldn't worry about the ph unless it's way off.
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
It just isn't really necessary as most freshwater fish can tolerate a wide range of ph. Unless you have discus you really don't need to go through any crazy methods of lowering ph. I have loads of dritfwood in my 55 gallon. If you want to keep your ph lower just put driftwood in. Boil it first to remove tannins unless you want tea colored water.
So then if I back out of this forum and hop into the plants forum of fish lore and it states about water parameters for certain plants or go to a freshwater forum section on fish and they talk about water parameters for the various fish that intend to stock my tank with just to ignore their advice?
 
matthewb01
  • #13
So then if I back out of this forum and hop into the plants forum of fish lore and it states about water parameters for certain plants or go to a freshwater forum section on fish and they talk about water parameters for the various fish that intend to stock my tank with just to ignore their advice?
But as you said certain plants. There are some fish and plants that are more difficult to keep that require a specific ph and will be stressed or die if the ph is not correct. Most plants and fish do not have these specific requirements. If you think that your fish will be happier and healthier if you lower your ph then continue to do that. I am just trying to say it isn't necessary unless you have a specific species of fish or plant that requieres a very specific ph. I'm not telling you it's forbidden as I will be doing just the same when I set my mbuna tank only I need to raise my ph. What fish and plants do you have?
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
Uhhh why do you want to alter your PH? What is it at now? 99% of fish will adapt to whatever the ph in your tank is... and using those products will just make it jump all over the place... you will add the PH down and then it will slowly climb back up and then you will add it again and it will climb back up.... usually there is no need to alter ph... unless it’s extreme... mine is 8.3 out of the tap and I use nothing and never have... my fish, Axolotls and fully aquatic frogs are all fine... (I have 8 + tanks lol) and have never used any ph stuff

As for the heavy metals I’m not really sure what that part means but it’s more for the chlorine and chloramines that the city adds to the water... it’s finw for humans.... VERY toxic for fish... in my personal opinion I prefer to use Prime... it’s more widely used and recommended but that’s totally your call...but if you so choose finish off that bottle and maybe switch.... it’s a very good product....
Just make sure you are doing the dosing correctly.... if you are using buckets and know exactly how many gallons you have taken out... add it to your last bucket based on what you took out only..... other choose to add it directly to the tank (like for people who do water changes with a python) then you add it as your tank is filling back up BUT you add it for how many gallons your tank is.... hope that helped a little...
(And there are ways to more naturally lower your PH but I would just leave it as is if it’s not extreme) believe me most fish will adapt to it
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
But as you said certain plants. There are some fish and plants that are more difficult to keep that require a specific ph and will be stressed or die if the ph is not correct. Most plants and fish do not have these specific requirements. If you think that your fish will be happier and healthier if you lower your ph then continue to do that. I am just trying to say it isn't necessary unless you have a specific species of fish or plant that requieres a very specific ph. I'm not telling you it's forbidden as I will be doing just the same when I set my mbuna tank only I need to raise my ph. What fish and plants do you have?
I was under the impression that controlling ph was paramount along with other parameters. There a couple tetras, scissor tails, one albino rainbow, one red eye, couple nerite, one chinses algae eater, two glow light. I think I have 8 fish 2 snails. not many. There probably 10 separate ludwigia repens stems (propagation) and three bacopa (its slow growing). Ludwigia was well but has slowed also, some type of deficiency that i'm currently working on.
 
matthewb01
  • #16
The whole thing with ph is you want it to be constant. When ph fluctuates it can cause problems. What are you dosing and what type of lights? I had all different kind of plants in my 120 gallon. My lighting sucked. I never wanted to spend money on a better light. I dosed K, Fe, CO2, and flourish but my plants always died. A few weeks ago I moved all of my plants into my other tanks with very bright LEDs, continued dosing, and also purchased root tabs and my plants have all been making great progress.
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #17
Oops. But anyway as long as your aquarium ph is in between 6.5-7.5 you're fine as most fish need ph somewhere around there. Some prefer 6-7 some prefer 6.5-7.5 but unless I'm trying to create a biotope tank where I'm trying to get as close to a fishes natural habitat specifically to entise breeding. I wouldn't worry about the ph unless it's way off.
Oh, sorry I fail to mention what I use to lower ph. Years ago (2 or 3) after a water change I ran out of the official fish safe, aquarium store purchased product and was upset (mad). It's Sunday evening and everything is closed. Keep in mind that this stuff isn't cheap for all the more you get in a container so I went to my shed and pulled out ph down for swimming pool. I said to my wife well it's either going to kill them or work it's 50/50. So I tried and bingo no issues. It works and ph in the aquarium would stay stable for a month without any adjusting. This is true because I went an entire month with no water change. By the way the ph down I'm using is made by clorox. Now though maybe I don't need to stress so much about it.
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #18
The whole thing with ph is you want it to be constant. When ph fluctuates it can cause problems. What are you dosing and what type of lights? I had all different kind of plants in my 120 gallon. My lighting sucked. I never wanted to spend money on a better light. I dosed K, Fe, CO2, and flourish but my plants always died. A few weeks ago I moved all of my plants into my other tanks with very bright LEDs, continued dosing, and also purchased root tabs and my plants have all been making great progress.
I agree with you on lighting. I use root tabs as well and dose with flourish comp. when comp is gone I'm switching to thrive. My bulb is over 10 years old and want to purchase a new super t8. Budget constraints are keeping me from just running out and getting one.
 
matthewb01
  • #19
Oh, sorry I fail to mention what I use to lower ph. Years ago (2 or 3) after a water change I ran out of the official fish safe, aquarium store purchased product and was upset (mad). It's Sunday evening and everything is closed. Keep in mind that this stuff isn't cheap for all the more you get in a container so I went to my shed and pulled out ph down for swimming pool. I said to my wife well it's either going to kill them or work it's 50/50. So I tried and bingo no issues. It works and ph in the aquarium would stay stable for a month without any adjusting. This is true because I went an entire month with no water change. By the way the ph down I'm using is made by clorox. Now though maybe I don't need to stress so much about it.
Hm interesting hey if it works and your fish are healthy that's great! I've always been more of a fan of using tons of driftwood to lower ph or certain types rock to raise it. I'm thinking about going with limestone for my mbuna tank to raise the ph I don't know too much about ph raising rocks other than that.
 
matthewb01
  • #20
I agree with you on lighting. I use root tabs as well and dose with flourish comp. when comp is gone I'm switching to thrive. My bulb is over 10 years old and want to purchase a new super t8. Budget constraints are keeping me from just running out and getting one.
I used to use T5 and never had results. I have very recently switched to LED it's so much cheaper and so much brighter. Also a lot more efficient. I'm never using fluorescent again and have never used metal hallide before.
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #21
The whole thing with ph is you want it to be constant. When ph fluctuates it can cause problems. What are you dosing and what type of lights? I had all different kind of plants in my 120 gallon. My lighting sucked. I never wanted to spend money on a better light. I dosed K, Fe, CO2, and flourish but my plants always died. A few weeks ago I moved all of my plants into my other tanks with very bright LEDs, continued dosing, and also purchased root tabs and my plants have all been making great progress.
After weeks of observing plant deficiency I was thinking nitrogen deficiency but my nitrates are 10-20 ppm (API test kit not very user friendly) so nitrogen shouldn't be a problem so this leaves magnesium, boron, lights or CO2. I don't run CO2 and don't use excel but may in future. We have some borax and epsom salt around my place and had thought of mixing up a brew but not sure of proper procedure for home brew.
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #22
Hm interesting hey if it works and your fish are healthy that's great! I've always been more of a fan of using tons of driftwood to lower ph or certain types rock to raise it. I'm thinking about going with limestone for my mbuna tank to raise the ph I don't know too much about ph raising rocks other than that.
Years ago someone mentioned to me about real seashells in an aquarium raises ph. Not sure if there is any merit to this though.
 
matthewb01
  • #23
Years ago someone mentioned to me about real seashells in an aquarium raises ph. Not sure if there is any merit to this though.
I believe that it is true and I saw on a youtube video 5 things this guy would do differently if when he restarted his cichlid tank and he said he wouldn't use seashells as a substrate. I agree they are a great method for raising ph but there's just something about using a nice white sandbed that I love. I use pool filter sand on all of my tanks except my saltwater which I used live sand for.
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #24
I used to use T5 and never had results. I have very recently switched to LED it's so much cheaper and so much brighter. Also a lot more efficient. I'm never using fluorescent again and have never used metal hallide before.
Instead of purchasing a super t8 couldn't I convert mine to an LED? Mine is one 48" bulb. This tank is about 20+ years old. Here is another question, how to I removed hard water spots from aquarium hood glass? I've tried scrubbing with some white vinegar but no much help. Maybe letting vinegar soak for a few hours would be best?
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #25
I believe that it is true and I saw on a youtube video 5 things this guy would do differently if when he restarted his cichlid tank and he said he wouldn't use seashells as a substrate. I agree they are a great method for raising ph but there's just something about using a nice white sandbed that I love. I use pool filter sand on all of my tanks except my saltwater which I used live sand for.
Sounds like your have a real passion for this hobby.
 
matthewb01
  • #26
Oh wow that's impressive 20 years! Just be careful about changing the lights sometimes plants can go into a bit of a shock but they should be fine. Anything impossible to remove from the outside of my tank I use a razor for. Scrapes right off.
 
matthewb01
  • #27
Sounds like your have a real passion for this hobby.
Thanks yeah once you have more than 3 tanks it becomes a lifestyle especially when you're keeping saltwater. I also have scoprions which are a lot of fun too. It is tough during the school year to take care of my tanks. I have to come home every weekend to take care of them. During the summer I do water changes every other day. This hobby is just an obsession. When I was younger I was so lazy and lost fish a lot so I've been wanting to make up for that by taking excellent care of my tanks. Only tank I think is a disgrace is my saltwater. Never lose anything but the hair algae is everywhere!
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #28
Oh wow that's impressive 20 years! Just be careful about changing the lights sometimes plants can go into a bit of a shock but they should be fine. Anything impossible to remove from the outside of my tank I use a razor for. Scrapes right off.
Yeah I've tried the razor blade idea to no avail. Then I thought of vinegar for hard water spots and this didn't help either. The water spots are on the hood glass that is between aquarium water and light. They aren't super bad but any help for old bulb was worth trying.
 
matthewb01
  • #29
Hm well if it's on the hood one thing you could do is use greenhouse siding. It's super cheap you could pickup at a hardware store and just cut to the size you need. Very easy to clean. Some of my tanks are just open topped. I really liked the look of the greenhouse siding and will continue to use it when I setup the cichlid tank
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #30
Oh wow that's impressive 20 years! Just be careful about changing the lights sometimes plants can go into a bit of a shock but they should be fine. Anything impossible to remove from the outside of my tank I use a razor for. Scrapes right off.
I last Thing before I head to bed. I have work in the morning. Would or Could I convert 48" t8 single bulb to a LED or wouldn't it be worth the effort and just replace the hood to a newer style? Keep in mind though if I change hood my snails will crawl out so maybe I can't change hood. The top of my tank has a border that runs the perimeter of tank and hood nest down inside this border.
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #31
Hm well if it's on the hood one thing you could do is use greenhouse siding. It's super cheap you could pickup at a hardware store and just cut to the size you need. Very easy to clean. Some of my tanks are just open topped. I really liked the look of the greenhouse siding and will continue to use it when I setup the cichlid tank
It's a good idea, I'll keep that in mind. Thanks.......
 
matthewb01
  • #32
I last Thing before I head to bed. I have work in the morning. Would or Could I convert 48" t8 single bulb to a LED or wouldn't it be worth the effort and just replace the hood to a newer style? Keep in mind though if I change hood my snails will crawl out so maybe I can't change hood. The top of my tank has a border that runs the perimeter of tank and hood nest down inside this border.
I would just purchase a new light if you are unhappy with the T8. The greenhouse siding hood covers the whole tank. It's not the most attractive hood for most people but it works really well for me. I just plop my LED on it. I have snails none of which have ever escaped.
 
acjag
  • Thread Starter
  • #33
I would just purchase a new light if you are unhappy with the T8. The greenhouse siding hood covers the whole tank. It's not the most attractive hood for most people but it works really well for me. I just plop my LED on it. I have snails none of which have ever escaped.
Interesting, So this covers the whole top of tank. Apparently it's not hinged. You just covered tank and sat light on top. I have a feeling my other half (wife) wouldn't approve of this for as aquarium is in our living room but I love the idea. I liked building things out of scraps (junk) and making it work. I made a solar pool heater out of some black plastic pipe and affixed it to a board spray painted black then I used a electric motor that is used to transfer liquids and plumbed it on to swimming pool. Pool pump has crazy water pressure. Wife would float on raft in pool and go in circles around pool from the pressure of water coming off of pump. She made me hide my inventions. One went on roof of house and the other is off to the side out of sight. LoL. I thought it was awesome. That Pump could shoot water 20 feet in the air.
 
matthewb01
  • #34
Ah nice. Yea if you want more info check out the king of diy on youtube I love his channel he has a vid on the same exact hood I am using. I think the vid is just called diy aquarium hood. DIY is fun but I agree it is hard to make something diy look attractive to the eye.
 
Francine
  • #35
Yeah I've tried the razor blade idea to no avail. Then I thought of vinegar for hard water spots and this didn't help either. The water spots are on the hood glass that is between aquarium water and light. They aren't super bad but any help for old bulb was worth trying.
I had really hard water before and the same happened to me... I ended up just getting new tops (they were cheap) and then just made sure to clean that glass spot with like a bottle of water and paper towel when I did water changes... it added like an extra 5 mins and no mineral deposits (and my water was as hard as nails!) lol
 

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