Changing Ph

Nevaeh Bowers

Valued Member
Messages
56
Reaction score
4
Points
43
Experience
Just started
Since I got my betta I have been using (conditioned) tap water in his tank. Our tap water has a very high PH. I have the API PH Testing kit and every time I test our tap water the test tube immediately goes dark blue. Ive been wanting to buy PH Stabilized water from the petstore for him for a while now but Its expensive and Ive been short on cash. Luckily my local dollar store carries ginormous jugs full of spring water for $1 and it has a PH of close to 7.

I want to eventually start using the spring water as opposed to our tap water when doing water changes but Im not sure how smooth I need the transition to be? Im assuming spring water is fine to use in his tank?

Can I do:
First water change: 75% tap water and 25% spring water
Second water change: 50/50
Third water change: 25% tap water and 75% spring water
Fourth: 100% spring water
 

75g Discus Tank

Fishlore VIP
Messages
4,501
Reaction score
2,099
Points
308
Experience
1 year
If you are short on cash, I would recommend against using spring water. In the long run, it will be extremely expensive.

Are you using the high range pH test kit?

Also, don’t bother with the pH. It will be fine for a betta.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #3

Nevaeh Bowers

Valued Member
Messages
56
Reaction score
4
Points
43
Experience
Just started
The spring water I buy at the dollar store is $0.70 for 50 oz, so close to a third a gallon. So to fill one gallon that comes out to about $2.10 which I think will be doable for me.

I don't think Im using the high range test kit? On the box it just says PH Test & Adjuster kit. It reads from ranges 6-7.6 but my tap water always looks significantly darker than the 7.6 color.

Do you think the PH could have anything to do with fin rot? Because hes in a heated/filtered five gallon tank that is maintenanced regularly and his fins keep rotting away I cant think of anything else besides PH that might be stressing him. Ive tested for almost everything else and PH is the only reading thats super off
 

PonzLL

Well Known Member
Messages
1,307
Reaction score
1,471
Points
158
Experience
3 years
My water pH is 8.0 and our betta is perfectly healthy. I'd be surprised if your water is any higher than that. Fish are great at adapting to their environments.
 

Inactive User

Well Known Member
Messages
1,003
Reaction score
732
Points
93
I don't think Im using the high range ? On the box it just says & Adjuster kit. It reads from ranges 6-7.6 but my tap water always looks significantly darker than the 7.6 color.
The API Freshwater Master Kit has two liquid reagents for testing pH: one low range (up to 7.6), one high range (over 7.6).

It's worth noting that large, sudden and/or repeated changes in pH disrupts the osmoregulation in fish, which is why it's important to try and maintain a consistent, stable pH regardless of whether it is low or high. As others have mentioned, with the exception of a few sensitive species, most tropical freshwater fish can tolerate a wide range of pH.

The fin rot is unlikely to be connected to pH.
 

skilletlicker

Valued Member
Messages
188
Reaction score
164
Points
63
Experience
Just started
The fin rot is unlikely to be connected to pH.
Of course the toxicity of ammonia, which can be connected to fin rot, increases with higher pH. But for the most part, the advice I've seen is to just leave pH be if at all possible. If I was in your shoes though and decided I wanted to take the problem on I would first get a test that works for high pH. Then I would treat my dechlorinated tap water in order to slowly bring down the system pH to a predetermined target selected with the help of a trusted mentor. The subject is discussed here by a guy I've come to trust.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #7

Nevaeh Bowers

Valued Member
Messages
56
Reaction score
4
Points
43
Experience
Just started
Thanks for the replies everyone! Upon further investigation I realized that I do not have the high range PH test kit. I have every kit that comes in the API Master kit, but I bought them all individually and didn't realize that this kit only tested a specific range of PH. Before I do anything else I will get the high range test kit and if I decided to try and lower the PH I will be back to let you all know.

So if a PH of 8 isn't too high at what point does the PH become a concern? Im somewhat new to fish keeping and didn't know that keeping a consistent PH was better than a 7.o PH. As long as nothing is drastically wrong with the PH I'll leave it alone.

Hopefully Ill be able to figure out whats causing the fin rot sooner or later. Its helpful to know that ammonia becomes more toxic with a higher PH, Ill de be keeping a closer eye on it from now on. Thanks for all the help everyone
 

Biev

Valued Member
Messages
491
Reaction score
207
Points
128
Experience
More than 10 years
pH becomes worth adjusting below 6 and above 8, since beneficial bacteria have a hard time doing their job in that kind of environment. Most species of fish will adapt to a pH between 6 and 8, provided it stays stable. If the pH is unstable, it can be buffered with the use of filter media and/or substrate.
 

Inactive User

Well Known Member
Messages
1,003
Reaction score
732
Points
93
So if a PH of 8 isn't too high at what point does the PH become a concern?
@skilletlicker is correct that pH increases the toxicity of ammonia. To a lesser extent, higher temperature does as well.

To clarify, there are two forms of ammonia: free ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4+). Free ammonia is quite toxic to fish, while ammonium is less so. Generally, when we refer to ammonia, we're referencing total ammonia (NH3 and NH4+).

In a solution of water, free ammonia and ammonium exists in an equilibrium:

NH3 + H20 <-> NH4+ + OH-

Higher pH and higher temperature causes the equilibrium to shift to the left: more free ammonia.

Generally, a pH below ~9.2 is ideal, as that's the approximate threshold for which the proportion of free ammonia equals ammonium.

Using your parameters and assuming that your tank's temperature is 81 degrees Fahrenheit, at a pH of 8 approximately 6.15% of total ammonia will be free ammonia. At a pH of 9.2, that increases to 50.9%.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom