Changing My Watersource?

neto333
  • #1
HI, usually I use bottled water (5 gallons bottle), is supposed to be filtrated spring water (but I still add some prime in the water to be extra cautious)
A few days ago I got a lionhead so I was going to put in in quarantine but I notice that I didnt have any water (I usually buy a lot of bottles) and it was late so my only option was to use tap water (obviously I added prime) has been almost a week, and I even did a waterchange a few days ago to the quarantine tank again with tap water and I haven't seen any problems.
The tap water from my city is catalogued as "drinking water" however is also recommended to use a water filter because the water can be contaminate in the pipes.
So I was planning to completly change my water source for all of my tanks (the problem that I have seen with the spring water that I bought is that is so filtrated that the hardness is very low), so what is the best way to change my water source?

Also I have a pdf with the water norms for my water (like how much mercury or radiation is permitted). But here are some important ones:
.2 mg/l <chlorine < 1.00 mg/l
chloride<400 mg/l
arsenic<.01 mg/l
copper<2.00 mg/ l
iron<.30 mg/l
Manganese<1.50 mg/l
nitrates<10.00 mg/l
nitrites<0.01 mg/l
Ammoniacal nitrogen<0.50 mg/l
6.50 mg/l <ph<8.50 mg/l
zinc<5.00 mg/l
 
richiep
  • #2
If you are using a lot of bottled water have you thought about investing in a RO sysyem
 
AquaticJ
  • #3
What do you think of his tap? Doesn’t seem unordinary to me. Minnowette
 
neto333
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
If you are using a lot of bottled water have you thought about investing in a RO sysyem
Yes but the spring water got me XD. Also I heard that reverse osmosis is not good because the hardness is 0 and you have to add some extra minerals
I was thinking about something with activated carbon like this
 
richiep
  • #5
RO WATER would be perfect as it allows you to reminerilise each tank to what you want you have more controll, reminerilseing is not a problem
Aquaticj you have different laws on water in the USA to what we have in the UK, if I used your water with the 2.00 of copper it would kill my shrimp and the ph at 8.5 is a lot higher than we have ours is around 7.5

Aquatic I've just looked up our house water spec in my part of the UK and its very simular to what neto333 as posted so as you say ist not bad at all
 
neto333
  • Thread Starter
  • #6
Aquatic I've just looked up our house water spec in my part of the UK and its very simular to what neto333 as posted so as you say ist not bad at all
Good to know that we have similar water. Do you have a RO water system or do you think only with seachem prime will work?
 
Inactive User
  • #7
What do you think of his tap? Doesn’t seem unordinary to me. Minnowette

There is, I think, an issue with the copper concentration at 2.0 mg/l (or 2 ppm). There's a lot of variables affecting copper toxicity: pH, temperature, calcium carbonate concentration, and the state of the copper (ionised, insoluble precipitate, etc.).

Copper toxicity also varies from fish to invert, species to species, etc. Noga (2010) indicates a maximum threshold of 0.15 to 0.20 ppm free ionic copper while treating fish using copper sulphate in order to prevent copper toxicosis.

Assuming that the OP's copper content is mostly free ionic copper, then it's far too high. But tap water analyses may not necessarily be indicative, and I would advise using a copper test kit to get a more representative result. If it is, in fact, quite high I would, as suggested, investigate the use of a multistage RO filter.

Aquaticj you have different laws on water in the USA to what we have in the UK, if I used your water with the 2.00 of it would kill my shrimp and the at 8.5 is a lot higher than we have ours is around 7.5

I don't think it's an issue of different national water regulations. I find that most developed countries tend to have comparable parameters for drinking water quality (which does not necessarily mean that the water out of your tap is of the same characteristic). For e.g. the UK Drinking Water Inspectorate indicates a maximum of 2.0 mg/l copper.

I find it's more an issue of local economics, geology, infrastructure, house plumbing, etc. that determines the characteristics of tap water.
 
neto333
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
There is, I think, an issue with the copper concentration at 2.0 mg/l (or 2 ppm). There's a lot of variables affecting copper toxicity: pH, temperature, calcium carbonate concentration, and the state of the copper (ionised, insoluble precipitate, etc.).

Copper toxicity also varies from fish to invert, species to species, etc. Noga (2010) indicates a maximum threshold of 0.15 to 0.25 ppm free ionic copper while treating fish using copper sulphate in order to prevent copper toxicosis.

Assuming that the OP's copper content is mostly free ionic copper, then it's far too high. But tap water analyses may not necessarily be indicative, and I would advise using a copper test kit to get a more representative result. If it is, in fact, quite high I would, as suggested, investigate the use of a multistage RO filter.



I don't think it's an issue of different national water regulations. I find that most developed countries tend to have comparable parameters for drinking water quality (which does not necessarily mean that the water out of your tap is of the same characteristic). For e.g. the UK Drinking Water Inspectorate .

I find it's more an issue of local economics, geology, infrastructure, house plumbing, etc. that determines the characteristics of tap water.

So the 2.0 mg/l maximum for copper is still very high? what do you think about Cuprisorb? and about this
Because I already have one like that.
 
Inactive User
  • #9
So the 2.0 mg/l maximum for copper is still very high? what do you think about ?

Yes, it's quite high in the context of fish toxicity.

Cuprisorb, I think, would be of more use if you were wanting to reduce copper concentrations after having dose a copper-based med for treating a condition. Whether it's useful in managing a long-term excess of copper in your tap water is something that, unfortunately, I cannot say. It would also require regular replacement. It can be recharged, but it requires concentrated hydrochloric (muriatic) acid, which may not be something that one would want to use.

I think it would be easier maintenance-wise to use a multistage RO filter. It would also assist in removing the ammonia and nitrate present in your tap water.
 
richiep
  • #10
Cuprisorb in the UK is $20 that would become expensive to keep maintained as Minnowette said,
 
neto333
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
Yes, it's quite high in the context of fish toxicity.

Cuprisorb, I think, would be of more use if you were wanting to reduce copper concentrations after having dose a copper-based med for treating a condition. Whether it's useful in managing a long-term excess of copper in your tap water is something that, unfortunately, I cannot say. It would also require regular replacement. It can be recharged, but it requires concentrated hydrochloric (muriatic) acid, which may not be something that one would want to use.

I think it would be easier maintenance-wise to use a multistage RO filter. It would also assist in removing the ammonia and nitrate present in your tap water.
and what about this one? because I already have one like this

It is supposed to remove heavy metals
 
AquaticJ
  • #12
Oh gosh. I thought that said .2 not 2 lol.

You could try an attachable Brita filter to see what it does for copper.
 
richiep
  • #13
To be honest I don't know as I've not read or seen any reports on it , I do know its almost 3 times the price of a RO system, at the end of the day only you make the decision, I would try and find out flow rate exatley what it takes out how long the cartridge lasts ECT, you get the idea, do some research on it
 
AquaticJ
  • #14
To be honest I don't know as I've not read or seen any reports on it , I do know its almost 3 times the price of a RO system, at the end of the day only you make the decision, I would try and find out flow rate exatley what it takes out how long the cartridge lasts ECT, you get the idea, do some research on it
3 times? The cheapest RO unit I’ve found is 120 USD.
 
richiep
  • #15
The unit hes refering to is £178 our ro units at £38 and 4 stage with dI resin £80
 
neto333
  • Thread Starter
  • #16
Oh gosh. I thought that said .2 not 2 lol.

You could try an attachable Brita filter to see what it does for copper.

Can we know what is your parameter in your country for copper? because I have seen that is the standar for most of the countries in the World Health Organization’s
 
AquaticJ
  • #17
The link he send was 85 USD which would be 65 pounds.
 
richiep
  • #18
I have checked and its th same as yours. Your water from the tap is almost identical to yours

Just checked again and My link came up as £178 strange
 
richiep
  • #19
Apart from your PH at 8.5 I can't see why you can't use your tap water, you can buffer the ph if needed

I have just found out why it's £178 when I checked on Amazon they have given me the price to import from USA p&p plus import duties lol lol lol
 

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