Changing from HOB to spongefilter

rkpate

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Hi. I currently have a hang on back filter for my 5 gallon tank. I was wanting to take the HOB filter out, but how long do I need to let both filters cycle together before I take the HOB out? Or is there another way?
 

LiterallyHydro

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You could probably get away with 3-4 weeks. I have seeded filters in as little as 2 weeks but I feel that is a pretty hasty change. If you want to keep it safe, go with a month.
 

The Red Severum

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You could probably get away with 3-4 weeks. I have seeded filters in as little as 2 weeks but I feel that is a pretty hasty change. If you want to keep it safe, go with a month.
On a stocked tank larger than 40gals I would agree, but with something as small as a 5gal I would wait longer just in case. The 5gal has a pretty fragile ecosystem.
 

LiterallyHydro

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Why would you need a 40 gallon tank to seed a filter quickly? There is less BB overall in a 5 gallon tank since the bio-load is lower. I've done the same thing with seeding my Spec V's built in filter with a sponge filter that was on another tank. It was seeded in just a few weeks. When I removed the sponge filter, there was not a detectable trace of ammonia in the aquarium.

Maybe my experience is different from yours, and I got lucky. I just think that two months is pretty long for seeding a filter in any size aquarium. Although I will say it is better to err on the side of caution, instead of rushing things.
 

The Red Severum

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Why would you need a 40 gallon tank to seed a filter quickly? There is less BB overall in a 5 gallon tank since the bio-load is lower. I've done the same thing with seeding my Spec V's built in filter with a sponge filter that was on another tank. It was seeded in just a few weeks. When I removed the sponge filter, there was not a detectable trace of ammonia in the aquarium.

Maybe my experience is different from yours, and I got lucky. I just think that two months is pretty long for seeding a filter in any size aquarium. Although I will say it is better to err on the side of caution, instead of rushing things.
If you have a smaller tank with less bio-load, you have a higher chance of losing any beneficial bacteria that you have. That is my thoughts on it, honestly there is no official proof of level of bacteria in a tank, and I have no scientific proof if I am right and you could be right. But when I am taking out the sole balance of a aquarium, I am going to err on the side of caution instead of rushing by taking out a filter and risking a crash in my tank.

I just did a seeding on a filter after 6 weeks. I had zero issues moving it from the other tank. My experience is 4-8 weeks depending on the bio-load and filter.
 

Bluestreakfl

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What type of media is in the hob? What I did when I switched from a whisper filter to a sponge when I converted my 10g into a shrimp tank, I took the biomedia from the old filter (which was like a bio sponge) and stuck it inside the housing of the sponge filter. If you can take out just your old media, you can somehow incorporate it to the sponge filter, either inside the center compartment, rubber banding it to the sponge, or something along those lines.
 
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rkpate

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It's a whisper with a biosponge I also made a rookie mistake and didn't cycle the 5g before I started stocking it.
 

Bluestreakfl

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Ok so youre doing the same filter transition I did. Basically I stuffed my old bio sponge into the internal compartment of the sponge filter (the part the sponge covers). My sponge filter is a deep blue brand, single sponge, but pretty good size sponge. Depending what kind of sponge filter, you can do like I did, or rubber band your old bio sponge around the new sponge. This will keep your cycle, and free up the space from having the extra filter in there.
 

LiterallyHydro

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That's a really good sponge filter you've got there. I had one for a 10G betta tank and it did the job wonderfully.

And The Red Severum.. I agree that it's better to wait longer than to take the risk. I think something we'll both gladly agree on is that in this hobby it's better to be patient and take your time with every decision than it is to risk crashing your tank over a rash decision.

The only thing I question is if 6-8 weeks is necessary, although it certainly is safer than 2 weeks.
 
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