Carpeting Plants ...

Animus

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I've been trying for a few months to root some dwarf hair grass in my 60 gallon tank. I have approximately only 15 fish in the tank all 2" or smaller in size class (mostly tetras of various genus) and a few corey cats. I know it takes a long time and a lot of patience to get a carpet established but my fish seem to be ripping it out of the substrate faster than I can replant it. Any advice on how to curb this habit? I assume it's mostly the corey's doing the damage.
 
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Animus

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gracelovespixie said:
Maybe try wedging it firmly between stuff that might help x
Not a bad idea, maybe if I get it started in some narrow spaces it will get underway enough to survive their onslaught? I'll give it a go. Thanks.
 

LuxuriantTen

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If you have a quarantaine tank you can try to keep the chorey's separated from your carpet for a few weeks, until the carpet has grown sufficiently and the roots are stronger. Chorey's just loosen the substarte, they don't actually eat the grass or anything so if you could give thegrass a headstart by removing the chorey's for a while you should be good to go
 
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Animus

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-Mak- said:
This is a pretty common problem, so usually people don't keep bottom dwellers in tanks they're trying to carpet. What light, substrate, ferts, any CO2?
Using a Finnex Planted Plus 24/7 SE CC, Substrate is a mix of basic National Geographic black gravel and Carib Sea Enriched (I think it was called FloraMax or something like that) I use API Leaf Zone, Root Tabs and CO2 Booster. No actual CO2 as of yet. I know I should have it for carpeting but haven't been able to make the investment just yet.
 

imba

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LuxuriantTen said:
If you have a quarantaine tank you can try to keep the chorey's separated from your carpet for a few weeks, until the carpet has grown sufficiently and the roots are stronger. Chorey's just loosen the substarte, they don't actually eat the grass or anything so if you could give thegrass a headstart by removing the chorey's for a while you should be good to go
Do this for sure. You'll need to give to give your hairgrass a head start to be well rooted.

Also, without CO2, it might take more than a few weeks for the hair grass to carpet the way you want it to be. I dont think Co2 booster would be much help tbh
 

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Animus said:
Using a Finnex Planted Plus 24/7 SE CC, Substrate is a mix of basic National Geographic black gravel and Carib Sea Enriched (I think it was called FloraMax or something like that) I use API Leaf Zone, Root Tabs and CO2 Booster. No actual CO2 as of yet. I know I should have it for carpeting but haven't been able to make the investment just yet.
The substrate is pretty inert and API leaf zone only has potassium and iron, I recommend you also get a more comprehensive fert like Nilocg Thrive.
 

Angelmom

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Another option would be to try something different for the carpet, especially in a tall tank. Although I know people don't often think of it as a carpeting plant, I have a pretty amazing carpet of dwarf sagittaria in one of my tanks, which seems to have a stronger root system than hairgrass. I have 3 large and very active albino corys in there, along with a good size bristlenose, and they haven't disturbed the sagittaria.
 
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Animus

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-Mak- said:
The substrate is pretty inert and API leaf zone only has potassium and iron, I recommend you also get a more comprehensive fert like Nilocg Thrive.
That is much needed information. I've found it very difficult to discern what types of fertilizers will help and which ones I'm wasting good money on! Thank You

LuxuriantTen said:
If you have a quarantaine tank you can try to keep the chorey's separated from your carpet for a few weeks, until the carpet has grown sufficiently and the roots are stronger. Chorey's just loosen the substarte, they don't actually eat the grass or anything so if you could give thegrass a headstart by removing the chorey's for a while you should be good to go
I think I'm going to do just that, I need a few days to a week because my Rainbow sharks are currently occupying my quarantine tank while I build their new home but once that's cycled, up and running I will give it a try. I love the Julie Corey's they are soooo cool! But they are a bit destructive at this stage of development in my tank. Didn't think about that when I purchased them

-Mak- said:
This is a pretty common problem, so usually people don't keep bottom dwellers in tanks they're trying to carpet. What light, substrate, ferts, any CO2?
Can you clarify your statement? Did you mean that people don't usually keep bottom dwellers in tanks that are carpeted in general or just while they are getting them established? I don't plan to allow the whole tank to become carpeted, I'm looking at about half of it, perhaps a little less. But if this is a bad idea long term then I will need to start formulating another plan for my corey's
 

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Animus said:
Can you clarify your statement? Did you mean that people don't usually keep bottom dwellers in tanks that are carpeted in general or just while they are getting them established? I don't plan to allow the whole tank to become carpeted, I'm looking at about half of it, perhaps a little less. But if this is a bad idea long term then I will need to start formulating another plan for my corey's
Both, because they dig around even after they’re rooted. Dwarf hairgrass does grow really long roots when established in a soil, but you might have difficulty getting to that point with them in there
 
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