Carpeting Plant Recommendation

Ice_Drake1

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I need a recommendation for a fast growing carpeting plant that can:
  1. Anchor well with the substrate (Flora-Max). I have an annoying fantail goldfish that keeps on digging the substrate for foods.
  2. Grow faster than other plants or as fast as Hornwort and Anacharis.
  3. Require no other fertilizer or CO2 pump.
I tried growing Marsilea Hirusta (Four-Leaf Clover) and Glossostigma Elatinoides (or I think that is what I got), but both are growing way much slower than Hornwort and Anacharis. I don't understand why only these plants grow so fast while everything else is either growing very slowly or went through a slow death like Moneywort.
 

TheBettaSushi

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I need a recommendation for a fast growing carpeting plant that can:
  1. Anchor well with the substrate (Flora-Max). I have an annoying fantail goldfish that keeps on digging the substrate for foods.
  2. Grow faster than other plants or as fast as Hornwort and Anacharis.
  3. Require no other fertilizer or CO2 pump.
I tried growing Marsilea Hirusta (Four-Leaf Clover) and Glossostigma Elatinoides (or I think that is what I got), but both are growing way much slower than Hornwort and Anacharis. I don't understand why only these plants grow so fast while everything else is either growing very slowly or went through a slow death like Moneywort.
I’d like to know too as all the info I have accumulated is that there is no such thing as carpeting plants that grow fast without the use of co2.
 

-Mak-

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The reply above is correct, no such plant exists. Marsilea is low tech friendly but by nature a slow grows. Glosso is more of a high tech plant which is probably why it’s not growing very fast either.

Also with the goldfish it’ll be nearly impossible to really get a carpet going before being uprooted.

You could possibly try carpeting plant substitutes like dwarf sag and s. repens, but they aren’t actually carpeting plants, may still have a problem with the goldfish
 

aussieJJDude

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The best I can think of is chain swords or dwarf sag. I've found both to be rather fast growing with good lighting.... they not short/compact like your other plants, but develop a good extensive root system that once established will keep them anchored...
 
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Ice_Drake1

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That is sad to know. Adding CO2 pump is a must if I want my plants to grow or they might end up like my Moneywort or my Amazon Swords.

I haven't setup a CO2 pump before. Currently, I am thinking of adding an air (oxygen) pump since I noticed that my fishes are gasping for oxygen during power outrages. (And it will be my first source of water aeration when power is restored as my filter refused to work on its own.) However, using such pump will increase oxygen concentration, but decease CO2 concentration in the water, which is bad for my plants.

On the other hand, when I did some reading about CO2 pump, I found out about using yeast to generate CO2. The CO2 is then injected to the water like a regular air pump for oxygen. Since these CO2 pumps are somewhat aerating the water, will aerating with CO2 help increase both CO2 and oxygen concentration in the tank?
 

TheBettaSushi

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That is sad to know. Adding CO2 pump is a must if I want my plants to grow or they might end up like my Moneywort or my Amazon Swords.

I haven't setup a CO2 pump before. Currently, I am thinking of adding an air (oxygen) pump since I noticed that my fishes are gasping for oxygen during power outrages. (And it will be my first source of water aeration when power is restored as my filter refused to work on its own.) However, using such pump will increase oxygen concentration, but decease CO2 concentration in the water, which is bad for my plants.

On the other hand, when I did some reading about CO2 pump, I found out about using yeast to generate CO2. The CO2 is then injected to the water like a regular air pump for oxygen. Since these CO2 pumps are somewhat aerating the water, will aerating with CO2 help increase both CO2 and oxygen concentration in the tank?
I’m looking into s. repens to use as a carpet myself because I’m getting tired of siphoning out nerite poop every day. I’m wondering if they’ll grow in fine sand or if I have to switch my substrate to soil. I know that s. repens will grow extremely slow without the use of co2 and will take a lot of time to make it into a carpet but I’m willing to give it a shot using root tabs and NilocG Thrive C. It’s one of the better options since propagating them is simply cutting and replanting compared to splitting from the root and replanting.

Edited to add: regarding the co2, I’m not experienced at all with co2 but I think it’s either or... either your oxygenating or providing co2... I don’t think both can be done at the same time with the method you mentioned. However I could be totally wrong as I wouldn’t have a clue about it. Hopefully others can chime in.
 
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Fahn

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I’m looking into s. repens to use as a carpet myself because I’m getting tired of siphoning out nerite poop every day. I’m wondering if they’ll grow in fine sand or if I have to switch my substrate to soil. I know that s. repens will grow extremely slow without the use of co2 and will take a lot of time to make it into a carpet but I’m willing to give it a shot using root tabs and NilocG Thrive C. It’s one of the better options since propagating them is simply cutting and replanting compared to splitting from the root and replanting.
It grows just fine without CO2. However, it grows vertically and will not spread and send out runners. You can still get a "carpet" but it requires constant pruning and replanting until it looks full and bushy. I did the same thing with Ludwigia repens in an old 10 gallon.

NilocG makes root tabs that have clay and topsoil, so plenty of iron and macro nutrients.
 

TheBettaSushi

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It grows just fine without CO2. However, it grows vertically and will not spread and send out runners. You can still get a "carpet" but it requires constant pruning and replanting until it looks full and bushy. I did the same thing with Ludwigia repens in an old 10 gallon.

NilocG makes root tabs that have clay and topsoil, so plenty of iron and macro nutrients.
Yes that’s exactly what I read to do. It’s going to take a lot of time unless I buy a lot of s repens and just plant them close together. I’m using a fluval aquasky set on low in conjunction with the Fluval edge 21 led stock light. I can up the lighting on the aquasky but not on the stock light unfortunately. I’m not even sure if it will work in the sand substrate I currently have as it’s really fine sand (caribsea supernaturals moonlight sand). I have to keep in mind that I have a nerite so I need something that doesn’t leach copper. The thrive I’m using doesn’t seem to bother him however, he’s been forming clear slime so not sure if that’s irritation caused by the fert.
 
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Ice_Drake1

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Regarding the co2, I’m not experienced at all with co2 but I think it’s either or... either your oxygenating or providing co2... I don’t think both can be done at the same time with the method you mentioned. However I could be totally wrong as I wouldn’t have a clue about it. Hopefully others can chime in.
Yeah, I initially thought that running an air pump would increase both oxygen and carbon dioxide in the air to the water. However, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the outside air is too low in comparison to the concentration of oxygen. The air pump would only increase the oxygen concentration in the water. At the same time, water aeration would cause CO2 degassing, which decreases CO2 concentration in the water.

Source: https://pets.stackexchange.com/questions/16072/will-an-airpump-increase-the-co2-level-in-my-aquarium

So I assume that aeration with CO2, on the other hand, should increase both oxygen concentration through increased aeration and CO2 absorption through the CO2 pump; however, further research indicates the CO2 pump doesn't help much if it doesn't make use of a good gas diffuser. The best way to increase CO2 concentration is to output the gas to the water pump instead of just outputting it as a regular air pump.

Source: https://www.qsl.net/w2wdx/aquaria/diyco2.html

Maintaining a balance of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the aquarium for both fishes and plants have become more difficult.
 

Fahn

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Yeah, I initially thought that running an air pump would increase both oxygen and carbon dioxide in the air to the water. However, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the outside air is too low in comparison to the concentration of oxygen. The air pump would only increase the oxygen concentration in the water. At the same time, water aeration would cause CO2 degassing, which decreases CO2 concentration in the water.

Source: https://pets.stackexchange.com/questions/16072/will-an-airpump-increase-the-co2-level-in-my-aquarium

So I assume that aeration with CO2, on the other hand, should increase both oxygen concentration through increased aeration and CO2 absorption through the CO2 pump; however, further research indicates the CO2 pump doesn't help much if it doesn't make use of a good gas diffuser. The best way to increase CO2 concentration is to output the gas to the water pump instead of just outputting it as a regular air pump.

Source: https://www.qsl.net/w2wdx/aquaria/diyco2.html

Maintaining a balance of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the aquarium for both fishes and plants have become more difficult.
It's possible to completely saturate the water with Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide; when plants pearl, it is because there is no way more Oxygen can dissolve in the water, so it is gassed off as fine bubbles. Even with very little surface agitation, with a thriving plant mass and adequate Carbon Dioxide injection, worrying about gas exchange shouldn't be an issue, as there will always be an abundance of Oxygen. Have the Carbon Dioxide turn off one hour before lights off so the plants can finish processing it and bring the water back to equilibrium.

You can always run an airstone on a timer at night to gas off extra Carbon Dioxide as well if that is a concern.
 

TheBettaSushi

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Yeah, I initially thought that running an air pump would increase both oxygen and carbon dioxide in the air to the water. However, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the outside air is too low in comparison to the concentration of oxygen. The air pump would only increase the oxygen concentration in the water. At the same time, water aeration would cause CO2 degassing, which decreases CO2 concentration in the water.

Source: https://pets.stackexchange.com/questions/16072/will-an-airpump-increase-the-co2-level-in-my-aquarium

So I assume that aeration with CO2, on the other hand, should increase both oxygen concentration through increased aeration and CO2 absorption through the CO2 pump; however, further research indicates the CO2 pump doesn't help much if it doesn't make use of a good gas diffuser. The best way to increase CO2 concentration is to output the gas to the water pump instead of just outputting it as a regular air pump.

Source: https://www.qsl.net/w2wdx/aquaria/diyco2.html

Maintaining a balance of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the aquarium for both fishes and plants have become more difficult.
Yup, seems like way too much work, maintenance, accurate dosing, getting into extra routines, etc especially for a co2 newcomer like myself. I think I’m willing to try it out later down the road and use some zebra danios in the tank since they’re extremely hardy. It’s not something I’m willing to risk with the fish and invert I have in my tank right now. However, if you do decide to go that route, let me know how you did it and how it works for you.
 
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-Mak-

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CO2 isn't injected by pump, instead you have a CO2 gas tank, regular, possibly solenoid, tubing, and an in-line diffuser or ceramic diffuser inside the tank. It should create no agitation. The way to get oxygen in with it is higher surface agitation through separate means - ideally something like a lily pipe.
This may help you some:
 

Vishaquatics

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Carpetting plants with goldfish is almost impossible. The only plant that would be able to withstand the goldfish's brute force is dwarf sagittaria and that is only after it has been established for months. Any other type carpet plant will get absolutely destroyed in the presence of a goldfish no matter how long it has been established.
 
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Ice_Drake1

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CO2 isn't injected by pump, instead you have a CO2 gas tank, regular, possibly solenoid, tubing, and an in-line diffuser or ceramic diffuser inside the tank. It should create no agitation. The way to get oxygen in with it is higher surface agitation through separate means - ideally something like a lily pipe.
This may help you some:
What a nice way to increase surface agitation. I can incorporate this design with the CO2 injection design from my other link; however, this may be something to do in the far future.

Yup, seems like way too much work, maintenance, accurate dosing, getting into extra routines, etc especially for a co2 newcomer like myself. I think I’m willing to try it out later down the road and use some zebra danios in the tank since they’re extremely hardy. It’s not something I’m willing to risk with the fish and invert I have in my tank right now. However, if you do decide to go that route, let me know how you did it and how it works for you.
I agree. It was the main reason why I started growing aquatic plants in the first place; it was to reduce the maintenance associated from raising fishes. As I looked more into the beauty of so-called "high tech" planted tank, I can't stop myself from setting up one myself. What I didn't realize is the additional maintenance required to maintain such a tank. I guess I might setup one when I have more free time on my hand.
 
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