Can Y'all Check Me On My Dechlorinator Math?

Discussion in 'Freshwater Beginners' started by Homeslice, Jun 8, 2019.

  1. Homeslice

    HomesliceWell Known MemberMember

    I want to make sure I do not shock my fish!

    So I bought some Pond Prime that is a lot more concentrated to save a bit of money on dechlorinating.

    The instructions say use 6 capfuls for 600 U.S. gallons. So one capful per 100 gallon.

    I take 5 capfuls of that and add it to an old, empty Jungle Start Right bottle I have. I top off that bottle with reverse osmosis completely dechlorinated water.

    That bottle is listed as being 236 ml.

    So, with the 5 capfuls having the ability to treat 500 gallons, and that being divided up by 236 ml, each ml I use has the ability to treat a little over 2 gallons. Let's round down very slightly to two. So that would be 2 gallons per ml of liquid in that bottle used.

    Now, the Jungle Start Right bottle says that one of ITS capfuls holds 5 ml.

    So, for every capful it treats 5 *2 = 10 gallons. So one capful for each 10 gallons.

    That is a very slight overkill (based on my rounding down to 2 above), so since the Pond Prime says you can overdose double or even more sometimes, I could use a bit more than one capful for 10 gallons likely without problems, but do not want to overdo it too much as I've witnesses what can happen if you do.

    That sounds about right?

    Thanks!
     
  2. BillCNC

    BillCNCValued MemberMember

    Seachem Prime and Safe CANNOT be stored with water added to it because it doesn't have a shelf life once mixed with water. Those product's turn Ammonia, Chlorine and Chloramine into a safer version of those chemical's but for only 48 hour's. After that, they turn right back into what they once were.

    Your math is correct, ... but do not add water to the mix unless you use it up entirely.

    This is from Seachem's web site:

    How long does Prime® stay bound to the ammonia, nitrite, and nitrates?

    A: Prime® will bind up those compounds for up to 48 hours. If they are still present after that time frame, they are released back into the water, unless Prime® is re-dosed accordingly. Also, if your ammonia or nitrite levels are increasing within a 24-hour period, Prime® can be re-dosed every 24 hours.

    I personally use Seachem Safe and have made my own dosing spoon for 30 Gal. I have 22 tanks and 3 55 gal. outdoor breeding tubs and a 2 pound container for about $30.00 would last me a life time at 3 water changes a week all 50% changes. In order for me to empty this container, I locally sell Seachem Safe and a dosing spoon making my water changes costing nothing and I actually make money from it.

    Try switching to Seachem Safe and make your own dosing spoon. It's by far the cheapest way to dechlorinate.

    Regards
    Bill
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Homeslice

    HomesliceWell Known MemberMember

    Wait a sec BillCNC. I have Safe, and I read exactly what you quoted - Safe cannot be added to water ahead of time since it will break down with the water. Hence why I got the Pond Prime. But how can that possibly apply to Prime/Pond Prime that are already IN water? That would make no sense to me unless they are not in water but are in something else?

    That dosing spoon sounds like an idea - any idea where to get super small spoons? I killed some fish awhile back using Safe and I have no doubt, even though I used a VERY small amount, I put in way too much and shocked them.

    Thanks!
     
  4. BillCNC

    BillCNCValued MemberMember

    As far as what is blended with prime, you could check the MSD spec's or call them.

    The dosing spoon's are easy to make for prime. Prime uses 1/4 teaspoon for 300 gal. The math is 10:1 for 30 Gal.

    Basically I took 1/4 table spoon of prime, and split that into 10 even piles. I then took some plastic stock I have and cut it into a 3/8" x 3/8" x 3" piece and used my drill press to drill a hole that was exactly the size for one of the piles to fit in perfectly level. Once set up, I made like 10 of them because I lost the first one I made.

    If you don't have a drill press, then it can be done by hand, it take's a bit longer to be accurate. The trick is to sneak up to the hole size so you don't make it to big.

    Regards
    Bill
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Homeslice

    HomesliceWell Known MemberMember

    Got it, thank you Bill!
     
  6. Wraithen

    WraithenFishlore VIPMember

    How did you overdose safe? Its 1/4 tsp for 300 gallons to dechlorinate, but the same dose for 75 gallons to work for ammonia reduction. That means there is a huge margin for error.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Homeslice

    HomesliceWell Known MemberMember

    Well, I didnt even attempt to measure it Wraithen. I had thought it was relatively safe on the overdose side, and i had read that the risk of chlorine in the water killing fish was a bit overblown, especially for small water changes, so i just threw some in. within a minute or two they were dead and dying.

    Actually, i have no idea whether I had overdosed or underdosed, but I guessed overdosed since they died so quick. But we have Chloramine in the water here in Houstin, so maybe thay can kill the fish extra quick if not properly treated.
     
  8. BillCNC

    BillCNCValued MemberMember

    I premix my water in 60 gal. barrel's.

    It say's it's safe to add during the filling but It seem's way to risky in my opinion. I saw a buddy kill fish twice on either side of the equation. He added it to the tank and then began filling and the other time he added it after filling. Both time's resulted in some losses that he thought was due to temperature differences.

    Regards
    Bill
     
  9. Wraithen

    WraithenFishlore VIPMember

    Ah. Gotcha. With how potent that stuff is, it was likely an overdose unless you used a pinch.
     
  10. kmbeck

    kmbeckValued MemberMember

    I just take a pinch of safe and toss it in the tank when I start refilling the water. This is in a 60 gallon tank.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    Homeslice

    HomesliceWell Known MemberMember


    See that is what i was doing kmbeck. Worked a fre times, then BAM all fish dead. So now I am veru paranoid about getting the right dose.

    Does anyone know what happens to fish if you do lets say a relatively large water change with water that has chlorine/chloramine? will they likely all die in just a few minutes to an hour? if not then it was almost certainly a safe overdose.
     
  12. Wraithen

    WraithenFishlore VIPMember

    Or ph shock, or nitrate shock. If you saw no ill effect the first few times and after 3 or 4 times everything died, I wouldn't blame the safe.