Can someone help my Anubius

deadhead

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Can anyone tell me what's wrong with my Anubius? It's been in my tank for a few months and always looked great until about a week ago. I'm not sure what it needs. All my other plants including other Anubius look healthy.
20200712_111116.jpg
 

Nataku

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Looks like a nutrient deficiency. Low in nitrogen, phosphate and possibly potassium. Has the plant sent out (or attempted to send out) any new leaves in the past month? A pic of them could be useful too, if so.
Getting some ferts into your tank would fix this right up, it's not too severe, yet.
 

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I am having issues with mine. It looks soft and mushy tied to hardscape. The leaves look awful yet the roots appear to be growing slowly into the substrates. I put it in the dark more often. Anyway somebody on here told me that Anubia’s is very slow to respond. He said that he bleached some plants and that the other types had shed and come back to life before the Anubia’s even showed signs of sickness. So perhaps it’s something that happened a while back and is now showing. Any changes in the tank? I’m new to plants I just know what somebody said on here.
 
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deadhead

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I cut back on phosphorus because the phosphate levels are above what's desired. There's a real heavy fish load in the tank so I cut back on nitrogen. The main reason is because I'm trying to find a balance and rid myself of an algae problem. I'd say I started that 2 weeks ago just before this problem started. The tank is well dosed with seachem potassium, iron and flourish. As far as new leaves, no there haven't been any at all. I should also add this plant has really long, hard roots and the rhizome is well above the soil line.

Could this really be from lighting that's too intense?
 

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deadhead said:
I cut back on phosphorus because the phosphate levels are above what's desired. There's a real heavy fish load in the tank so I cut back on nitrogen. The main reason is because I'm trying to find a balance and rid myself of an algae problem. I'd say I started that 2 weeks ago just before this problem started. The tank is well dosed with seachem potassium, iron and flourish. As far as new leaves, no there haven't been any at all. I should also add this plant has really long, hard roots and the rhizome is well above the soil line.

Could this really be from lighting that's too intense?
All aquatic plants need the macronutrient Nitrogen to thrive as well. Id say that is your issue if you stopped dosing it. Also cutting back on nitrogen wont help the bioload. Is the tank stocked properly and are you preforming enough weekly water changes? Theres an underlying issue to your heavy bioload
 
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deadhead

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I just noticed it starting on another. the closest leaf is starting to brown on the edge and there's some yellowing in the leaf. This one has been growing as you can see in the picture. It also was completely covered in BBA 1 month ago. There's very little algae on it now. They've both been doing well under the same lighting for a few months.
20200712_141620.jpg
 
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deadhead

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Blueberrybetta said:
All aquatic plants need the macronutrient Nitrogen to thrive as well. Id say that is your issue if you stopped dosing it. Also cutting back on nitrogen wont help the bioload. Is the tank stocked properly and are you preforming enough weekly water changes? Theres an underlying issue to your heavy bioload
50% every week. Nitrate levels are pretty low. I was simply saying my algae problem could be from too much ferts so I thought it might be safe to cut back nitrogen due to my heavy fish load. Phosphate levels are actually high. This tank has more bio filtration than it needs. It's not over populated but there really isn't room for anymore.
 

Blueberrybetta

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deadhead said:
50% every week. Nitrate levels are pretty low. I was simply saying my algae problem could be from too much ferts so I thought it might be safe to cut back nitrogen due to my heavy fish load. Phosphate levels are actually high. This tank has more bio filtration than it needs. It's not over populated but there really isn't room for anymore.
Too much Phosphate is mainly the real reason why algae grows so quick too. For the anubias though, they cannot be under direct lighting. I had my anubias under lighting at first and all the tips yellowed and grew brown algae, then I moved the anubias in complete shade and its fully thriving and sprouts a new leaf every week.
Do you dose any extra iron perhaps? Anubis and Swords thrive on Iron. I also suggest the Thrive All-in-one fertilzers so they can get all the micro and macronutrients they really need.
 
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deadhead

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Blueberrybetta said:
Too much Phosphate is mainly the real reason why algae grows so quick too. For the anubias though, they cannot be under direct lighting. I had my anubias under lighting at first and all the tips yellowed and grew brown algae, then I moved the anubias in complete shade and its fully thriving and sprouts a new leaf every week.
Do you dose any extra iron perhaps? Anubis and Swords thrive on Iron. I also suggest the Thrive All-in-one fertilzers so they can get all the micro and macronutrients they really need.
I do dose iron because I have a lot of red plants. They were only looking okay for awhile so I increased the amount of iron. Now they're a brilliant red and there's several different ones in the tank. I just started growing frogbit but there's far from enough to shade them. I'll start by lowering the intensity. All my plants were doing well under less intense light. Like I said, I've been tinkering with things trying to put a leash on this algae problem. That's been going really well for the past month but now this.
 
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deadhead

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After further evaluation that first one will be moved under the frogbit later today. The frogbit is growing in a front corner and it appears to be a little less bright below it. I just started that stuff 2 weeks ago and it more than doubled. Another week or two and the area below will be getting much less light.

Planted tanks are tricky!
 

Blueberrybetta

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i do know Iron plays a big role with Anubias so its good you are dosing that as well. But If you have the right nutrients being dosed , the rhizome isnt buried, and some roots are exposed then I have to say it may be too much lighting. I use all floating plants to shade my anubias and its crazy how much a difference it did! The older leaves have gotten bigger so they do reach some lighting but I do recommend trying some shade and see if that helps. Shade completely stopped the tips from yellowing more and now I have 0 issues with my anubias.
Also, even though the roots can be buried, some people including myself, have reported better growth with the whole plant including roots, being exposed to the water column by floating or attached to driftwood/rocks. That may help as well if you want to try that.
 
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deadhead

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Is it possible for the dark brown part to turn green again or should I expect that leaf to get worse?
 

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